Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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Flowering PeriodAugust - October
Distribution and Habitat
P. halophila is known from only two localities, east of Salmon Gums and over 200 km to the west at Lake King.  It
grows on slightly elevated ridges and islands of aeolian sand in or along the margins of salt lakes, in very low open
shrubland.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Lake King 
Kat
LG
NR (Mining Lease)
1.9.89
100+
Good
2
Salmon Gums 
Esp
Esp
NR
16.9.88
300
Healthy
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The Lake King population has been subject of mining for gypsum in at least one area (A. Wilson, personal
communication).  Further survey of salt lakes between Salmon Gums and Lake King is required. 
P. halophila occurs in two Nature Reserves.
References
Rye (1988).

140
Pimelea pelinos Rye
THYMELAEACEAE
An erect or straggling shrub to 60 cm tall, with male and female flowers on separate plants.  Leaves are opposite, green,
narrow but broader towards the tip (obovate, 2.5-11.5 x 0.8-2.5 mm) and lack hairs.  Flowering branchlets occur in the
uppermost leaf axils and have minute reddish bracts at the base.  The 2 or 4 involucral bracts are leaf-like.
Inflorescences consist of 5-21 cream flowers which are densely hairy outside, but lack hairs inside the tube; sepals are
hairy on both sides.  Male flowers have a tube (2-3 mm) that expands from 0.5 mm diameter at the middle to 1 mm at
the summit; the anthers are virtually without stalks.  Female flowers have a tube (1.5 x 1 mm) which scarcely continues
above the ovary; the ovary has an apical tuft of hairs; the stigma is somewhat brush-like.
Flowering Period:  June - July
Distribution and Habitat
Pimelea pelinos is known from only one locality east of Scaddan.  It grows in grey sandy clay on low ridges between
salt lakes, in shrubland.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Scaddan,E Esp
Esp
?VCL
10.6.88
200
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
P. pelinos appears to be geographically restricted and is not known to occur in any conservation reserve.  Further
survey of salt lakes south of Scaddan Road is recommended.  According to Annette Wilson (personal communication),
P. pelinos does not occur around salt lakes immediately north of Scaddan Road which have a gypsum rather than a clay
substrate.  
References
Rye (1989).

141
Pultenaea sp. Mt Beaumont (K.R.Newbey 7928)
PAPILIONACEAE
A moderately open, spreading shrub, 30-40 cm tall and 18-20 cm wide, divided just above ground level into 4-5
branches which have only sparse secondary branching.  Young branches are covered in short, soft hairs.  Leaves are
linear (5-8 x 0.8 mm), curved backwards slightly, have margins that are rolled backwards towards the midrib (revolute),
and an apex with a fine, spiny tip.  There is a small appendage (stipule) at the base of the leaf stalk which is narrow-
triangular (5 x 1 mm), dark brown and hairy along the margins.  Leafy flower heads occur at the ends of branches.  The
relatively small flowers are borne on short, hairy stalks.  The calyx (5 x 3.5 mm) is covered with short, soft hairs; the 2
upper lobes are not united.  Petals are brownish-red and yellow.
Flowering Period:  November - December
Distribution and Habitat
This taxon is known from only one locality, south-east of Mt Beaumont.  It grows in well-drained shallow sand over
clay on a flat plain, in mixed open Eucalyptus shrub mallee.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Beaumont,SE 
Esp
Esp
?Shire Rd Res.
10.11.1980
Rare
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Search for this taxon in October 1992 failed to relocate the known population.  Further intensive survey of the area is
required.
References
Newbey (1983).

142
Rulingia tratmannii C.R.P.Andrews
STERCULIACEAE
=  ?Rulingia craurophylla F.Muell.
A shrub, 0.5-1.2 m tall, with slender branches, covered when young with grey, velvety, short matted hairs which
disappear as the plant matures.  Leaves are linear to linear-lanceolate (20-25 x 3-6 mm), stalkless, have a rounded apex,
margins that are cut into rounded teeth and curve backwards towards the midrib (revolute); both sides of the leaves are
covered with star-shaped hairs.  Flowers are in loose heads, borne on long, branching stalks (10-20 mm) in the axils of
leaves.  The calyx is covered with short matted hairs, especially at the base, and the upper part is prominently angled.
Petals are expanded into lateral lobes at the base, the ligula are very narrow and 3-nerved.  The ovary is without hairs.
Styles are free, but the stigmas are more or less coherent.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Taxonomy
This taxon appears to have been described twice, originally as Rulingia craurophylla by F. Mueller (1875), and later as
Rulingia tratmannii by C.R.P. Andrews (1904) from a specimen collected near Dundas in 1903.  
A note on the folder in the New South Wales Herbarium states "These species are regarded as synonyms in Blackall
and Grieve 'How to Know Western Australian Wildflowers Part II'.  There is no mention of R. coacta S.Moore which is
possibly also synonymous although Gardner in his Enumerator lists both R. coacta and R. tratmannii.  I am inclined to
unite material bearing these 3 names under the earliest R. craurophylla until further evidence comes up." (Anon.)
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Inspection of the type specimens would elucidate the identity of these species.  Their current locality is unknown.
References
Andrews (1904), Mueller (1875).

143
Scaevola sp. Swallow Rock (K.R.Newbey 9677)
GOODENIACEAE
A dense, cushion-like shrub, 1-3 cm tall and 20-35 cm wide, which divides at ground level into numerous, radiating
branches pressed closely to the ground.  The soft leaves (3-5 x 2 mm) are covered in long white hairs and are crowded
at the ends of branches.  Cream-coloured flowers are borne in the axils of leaves where they are partly hidden by
foliage.  The corolla tube and lobes are covered with long, white hairs.
The only other cushion-like Scaevola occurring in the same range is S. pulvinaris which can be distinguished by its
hairless leaves.  S. sp. Swallow Rock appears to have some affinity with S. arenaria.
Flowering Period:  November - December
Distribution and Habitat
This taxon is known only from an area near Swallow Rock, 45 km east of Lake King.  It is common in patches on the
margins of minor, freshwater drainage lines on a flat sandplain, in a low shrub complex.  
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Swallow Rock 
Esp
Rav
VCL
22.11.82
Common
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
S.  sp. Swallow Rock is very poorly known and possibly geographically restricted.  It not known to occur in any
conservation reserve.  Fresh flowering material is required for taxonomic work.  Further survey is required.
References
Newbey (1983).

144
Spyridium minutum Rye 
RHAMNACEAE
A moderately dense, rigid undershrub, 10-25 cm tall and 5-15 cm wide.  Young branches are light brown and covered
with fine hairs which disappear with age.  Leaves are very small (1.0-1.3 x 1 mm) and thick, with the margins rolled
backwards towards the midrib (revolute), giving the leaf an inflated appearance.  The upper surface of the leaf is shiny,
hairless and green, while the lower surface is cream-coloured caused by the covering of fine, matted hairs.  The
creamy-grey flowers are usually in pairs (or single), small (<2 mm) and without stalks.
Spyridium minutum is similar to S. cordatum, but can be distinguished by the flowers being single or in pairs, whereas
S. cordatum has numerous flowers per cluster.
Flowering Period:  March, May, September
Distribution and Habitat
S. minutum is widespread between the Young River and Clyde Hill extending northwards to near Salmon Gums, a
range of 200 km.  It prefers sandy clay loams on undulating plain, in Eucalyptus mallee/woodland and myrtaceous
scrub.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Dowak Esp
Esp
NR
20.11.92
12+
Good
2
529 ml peg 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
15.5.68
-
-
3
Mt Beaumont,SE 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
10.10.92
1 000+
Good
4
West Point Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
9.84
-
-
5*
Cascades Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
11.9.92
5+
Good
6*
Griffiths Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
12.9.92
10 000+
Good
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
1 000+ 
Good
7*
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
2 000+
Good
8*
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
12.9.92
<10
Good
9*
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
12.9.92
<10
Good
10*
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
5+
Good
11*
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
5+
Good
12*
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
Occasional
Good
13*
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
60+
Disturbed
14*
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
10+
Good
15a*
Griggs Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
14.9.92
1 000+
Good
15b*
Fields Rd
Esp
Esp
NR
14.9.92
50+
Good
16*
Grass Patch,W 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
24.9.92
10+
Good
17*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
1
Good
18*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
Occasional
Good
19*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
20+
Post-fire
20*
Mt Heywood,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
5+
Good
21*
Mt Heywood,WNW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
20+
Good
22*
Mt Heywood,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
10+
Good
23*
Mt Ridley,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
23.5.93
5+
Good
24*
Parmango Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
14.11.93
50+
Good
25*
Grass Patch 
Esp
Esp
?Rail Res.
17.11.92
3
Good

145
Known Populations (cont’d)
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
26*
Salmon Gums,W 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
17.11.92
Frequent
Good
27*
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
20+
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
S. minutum was originally thought to be rare (Newbey 1983) and endangered (Burgman 1985b).  Recent surveys have
shown this inconspicuous species to be relatively common.  Two localities of Burgman (1985b) on West Point Road
were revisited and found to be the closely related S. cordatum.  
S. minutum grows in at least four Nature Reserves.
References
Burgman (1985b), Newbey (1983).

146
Stachystemon sp. Mt Baring (K.R.Newbey 9773)
EUPHORBIACEAE
A low spreading, becoming rounded, dense shrub, 15-18 cm tall and 20-30 cm wide.  Stems are contorted and woody
with grey rough flaky bark; young stems are ridged and bright light brown.  Leaves are alternate, keeled (ridged like the
bottom of a boat) with a prominent midrib underneath, narrow but broader towards the tip (5-7 x 1-2 mm) which has a
hard, sharp point.  There are 2 narrow-triangular bracts (stipules, 1.8 mm), at the base of each leaf.  The almost
pendulous, deep maroon flower heads are at the ends of branches; 3-4 male flowers surround 2 central female flowers.
Male flowers have 3 outer bracts (2-4 x 1.5-2.5 mm) which are glossy black-grey with a reddish margin, the inner 3
bracts (7 x 1.4 mm) are dull black; there are 70-80 globular anthers crowded on the grey-black column (2 mm).  Female
flowers are tubular (2 mm) with 2 pale brown outer bracts and 4 leaf-like inner bracts; the ovary is angular, bright green
with a 2-3 lobed style.  Fruits (7 x 3.5 mm) are finely ridged and bright green.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
Stachystemon  sp. Mt Baring is known from only two localities, near Mt Baring and over 250 km to the west near
Bandalup Hill.  It grows in deep white sands on a flat plain in Eucalyptus tetraptera mallee and on a breakaway of
lateritized spongolite with E. lehmannii and Banksia lemanniana.  Associated species include Phymatocarpus
maxwellii, Astartea ambigua, Calothamnus gracilis and Banksia gardneri and various sedges.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Baring,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
11.10.83
Rare
-
2*
Bandalup Hill 
Alb
Rav
VCL
8.9.93
1
-
* = new population (C.J.Robinson)
Response to Disturbance
According to Newbey (1983) this taxon resuckers after fire.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
In April 1993, the general area near Mt Baring population was surveyed, but this taxon was not found.  Further survey
is required.
References
Newbey (1983), Robinson and Coates (1995).

147
Styphelia pulchella (Stschegl.) Druce
EPACRIDACEAE
An upright to spreading shrub, 40-50 cm tall and 35-40 cm wide.  Leaves are rigid, overlapping, very concave and
curved backwards at the tip (recurved), dull green, broader towards the base than the tip (ovate, 2.5-3.0 x 2.5 mm) and
have a fine, sharp spiny tip.  Leaf margins are strongly serrated.  Single flowers are borne in leaf axils.  The corolla is
white, tubular (6-7 mm), hairless inside, but with bearded lobes that curve backwards; the stamens are exposed. 
Flowering Period:  August - October
Distribution and Habitat
Styphelia pulchella is distributed over 550 km, from the Fitzgerald River National Park to south of Cocklebiddy.  It
grows on well-drained, sandy clay loams on flat plains or mountain slopes, in shrub/heath communities with or without
open mallee.  Associated species may include Eucalyptus transcontinentalis, E. salubris, Melaleuca pauperiflora,
Daviesia benthamii and Acrotriche cordata.  
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Cocklebiddy,S Esp
Esp
NR
11.7.74
-
-
1b
Cocklebiddy,S
Esp
Esp
NR
9.8.86
-
-
2
Mt Norcott 
Esp
Esp
-
22.9.78
-
-
3
Mt Ney 
Esp
Esp
NR
5.9.86
-
-
4
Parmango Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
5.9.86
-
Disturbed
5
Bonnie Hill,W 
Esp
Esp
-
2.8.83
-
-
6a
Mt Ragged,SW 
Esp
Esp
NP
17.8.80
-
-
6b*
Mt Ragged,W
Esp
Esp
NP
22.4.93
50+
Post-fire
7a
Hatter Hill,SE 
Esp
Rav
VCL (Mining Lease)
8.8.79
1
-
7b
Hatter Hill,S 
Esp
Rav
VCL
3.9.70
Common
-
8
Jerdacuttup River 
Alb
Rav
-
15.8.65
-
-
9a
Ravensthorpe,E Alb
Rav
-
4.10.81
Scattered
-
9b
Ravensthorpe,E
Alb
Rav
-
3.9.86
-
-
10
Ravensthorpe,S Alb
Rav
-
-
-
-
11
Mt Desmond 
Alb
Rav
VCL
9.83
Occasional -
12
Ravensthorpe,S Alb
Rav
-
26.8.65
-
-
13
Phillips River 
Alb
Rav
-
1800s
-
-
14
East Mt Barren 
Alb
Rav
NP
9.24
-
-
15
Eyre Range,W 
Alb
Rav
NP
26.4.69
-
-
* = new sub-population
Response to Disturbance
Two years after a hot burn (February 1991) in the Mt Ragged area, S. pulchella was found resuckering and in bud.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown

148
Summary and Recommendations
S. pulchella is widespread and known to occur in four conservation reserves. Newbey (1983) considered that although
the soil/vegetation types are widespread where S. pulchella could grow, the species is rare.  J. Powell (personal
communication) suggests that it is relatively common in localised areas.  
References
Blackall and Grieve (1981), Newbey (1983).

149
Thysanotus baueri R.Br.
ANTHERICACEAE
Fringed Lily
A perennial plant with a small rhizome and tuberous roots that are ellipsoidal (25-75 x 5-10 mm).  The 3-5 leaves are
almost cylindrical (6-13 cm) and usually wither early.  The inflorescence is racemose (8-24 cm long), with umbels of 1-
4 flowers on articulated stalks (6-10 mm) and 2-4 stalkless flowers below.  Sepals are elliptic (2.5 mm wide) and petals
oblong-elliptic (4 mm wide) with the hairy fringe 2-2.5 mm long.  There are 6 stamens; anthers are curved and twisted,
the 3 yellow outer anthers being shorter (3.5 mm) than the 3 purple inner anthers (6.5 mm).  The style (7 mm) is
straight except for the apex.
Flowering Period:  October - December
Distribution and Habitat
Thysanotus baueri is widely distributed in Western Australia, with a known range of over 1500 km.  Usually it has been
found in grassy open habitats in drier inland areas on open plain, in calcareous loam over limestone or in gravelly red
soil.
T. baueri also occurs in central and western New South Wales, north-eastern Victoria and southern South Australia.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
?Rawlinna Gold
Bldr
Pastoral 
Lease
20.10.66
-
-
2
White Cliffs 
Gold
-
Pastoral Lease
21.10.63
Frequent
-
3*
Deralinya Esp
Dund
VCL
14.11.93

000+
Healthy
4
Cocklebiddy,E Esp
Dund
-
13.10.83
1
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Although  T. baueri is poorly known in Western Australia, its wide distribution suggests that it has been poorly
collected, rather than naturally rare.  Further survey is still required to determine its status in this State.
References
Brittan (1987).

150
Verticordia sieberi var. pachyphylla A.S.George 
MYRTACEAE
An erect, spreading shrub, 40-50 cm tall and 30-50 cm wide.  Leaves are dull lightish green, very broad elliptic (3 x
1.5-2 mm) and thick.  Flower stalks (1-3 mm) are also very thick.  Rounded clusters of 1-10 flowers are borne at the
ends of branches.  Flowers have light pink petals with fringed margins; the calyx tube is covered in long, grey hairs and
has pale pink, comb-like, deeply fringed sepals (2-3 mm); the style (4 mm) is bearded around the upper section. 
Verticordia sieberi is distinguished from V. plumosa by being a slender shrub with deeper fringing of the sepal lobes,
and from V. stenopetala by the shorter petals and style (V. sieberi has a style equal to or just exceeding the petals, while
V. stenopetala has a style about twice the length of the petals).  V. sieberi var. curta which grows to the west of var.
pachyphylla can be distinguished by its shorter sepals (1.5-1.7 mm) and the margins of petals which are shortly
serrated.

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