Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



Yüklə 1,44 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə14/25
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü1,44 Mb.
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   25

Flowering PeriodJanuary
Distribution and Habitat
V. sieberi var. pachyphylla is known from two localities, one being in Frank Hann National Park.  It grows on well-
drained, slightly saline aeolian loamy sand on the inner slope of a salt lake.  It is frequent in patches in low shrubland,
associated with Darwinia diosmoides.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Frank Hann 
Esp
Rav
NP
26.1.90
Frequent
-
2
Lake King-
Esp
?Esp
Gravel Res.
30.10.88
-
-
Norseman Rd
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
According to George (1991), further study is needed on the taxonomy of V. sieberi, as this species shows considerable
variation.  He suggests that this taxon probably occurs around other salt lakes in the region of the known population.
Further survey is required.
At least one population of V. sieberi var. pachyphylla occurs within the Frank Hann National Park.
References
George (1991).

214
B.  Priority Two Taxa
Based on the October 1992 Priority Flora List there were 74 Priority Two taxa known from within the boundaries of the
Esperance District.
Of these, 39 taxa were located during surveys in 1992 and 1993.  New populations or sub-populations were found for 26
taxa. 
The following taxa are not included, as current information indicates that they are not distributed in the Esperance
District:
Cymbonotus preissianus
Dampiera deltoidea
Eucalyptus stoatei x tetraptera
Grevillea wittweri
The following taxa were deleted as they were identified as being another species:
Baeckea sp. Cape Arid (K.R.Newbey 9753)

Micromyrtus imbricata
Pultenaea sp. Bremer Range (K.R.Newbey 8205)

Pultenaea conferta
Pultenaea sp. Wittenoom Hills (M.A.Burgman 2564)

Pultenaea spinulosa
The following taxa were renamed during the project:
Amperea sp. Ravensthorpe (M.A.Burgman 2154)

Monotaxis sp. Ravensthorpe (M.A.Burgman 2154)
Asteraceae genus nov. (M.A.Burgman 4418)

Haegiela tatei 
Daviesia sp. CAM (K.R.Newbey 8162) 'campephylla'

Daviesia campephylla ms
Eucalyptus fraseri subsp. nov. Fraser Range (A.Popplewell 2.69)

Eucalyptus fraseri subsp. melanobasis ms
Eucalyptus sp. Balladonia (S.D.Hopper 3115) [aff. pileata]

Eucalyptus spreta ms
Grevillea sp. Scaddan (P.Olde 91/332) [aff. plurijuga]

Grevillea superba
Persoonia hakeiformis (Esperance specimens different)

Persoonia sp. Scaddan (M.A.Burgman 4424)
Scaevola brooksiana
= Scaevola brookeana
Spyridium sp. Frank Hann (K.R.Newbey 6688)

Spyridium mucronatum subsp. mucronatum ms

215
Acacia amyctica R.S.Cowan & Maslin
MIMOSACEAE
A spreading, moderately dense shrub, 0.7-1.5 m tall with smooth, light grey bark.  Phyllodes ('leaves') are narrow to
elliptic and wider towards the apex (15-25 x 2.5-4.0 mm), straight or slightly curved, hairless, have numerous closely-
parallel nerves, a stiff, spiny tip which is asymmetrical, and 1 basal gland.  The golden flower heads are globular (3-3.5
mm), 20-25 flowered, with 2 heads per axil borne on stalks (4-7 mm).  Legumes are linear (to 60 x 3 mm), not
constricted between the seeds and strongly curved in one or more circles.
Acacia amyctica is very similar in appearance to A. ancistrophylla var. ancistrophylla which has fewer flowers per head,
phyllodes without a spiny tip and indistinct nerves.  It also resembles 
A. whibleyana, but that species has wider fruits in
which the seeds are arranged obliquely, and does not occur in the same geographic area.
Flowering Period:  September
Distribution and Habitat
A. amyctica is distributed over about 80 km, from Peak Charles National Park and Pyramid Lake east to Salmon Gums.
It grows in loam and on sandy clay plains in low woodland and open shrubland.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Salmon Gums 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
25.9.83
-
-
2
Salmon Gums,N 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
17.12.71
-
-
3a
Peak Eleanora,S 
Esp
Esp
NP
18.9.93
500+
Good
3b*
Peak Eleanora,S
Esp
Esp
NP
19.9.93
100+
Good
3c*
Peak Eleanora,S
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
1 000+
Good
3d*
Peak Eleanora,S
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
1 000+
Good
4*
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
10
Good
5
Grass Patch,W 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
20.9.93
50+
Good
6
Dunn Swamp,E 
Esp
Esp
VCL
15.11.80
Frequent
-
* = new population / sub-population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
Acacia amyctica has the potential to be distributed through largely inaccessible areas of unvested Crown Land to the
south-west and south-east of Peak Charles.  Further opportunistic survey is required.  

216
Acacia asepala Maslin ms
MIMOSACEAE
A spreading shrub, 0.5-1.5 m tall with branchlets that are red-brown at the extremities.  Phyllodes ('leaves') are needle-
like (10-25 x 1 mm), rigid, thick, hairless, 5-nerved, and have a gland 2-4 mm above the base.  The small, golden flower
heads are globular, 10-flowered, and borne on stalks (2 mm) with 2 per axil.  Flowers are unusual in that they lack a
calyx and are not subtended by bracteoles.
Acacia asepala ms has similar branchlets and phyllodes to A. calcarata which has 15-20 flowers per head on stalks 7
mm long.  Phyllodes also resemble those of 
A. colletioides which have 8 nerves, as well the flowers have a calyx and
bracteoles.
Flowering Period:  September
Distribution and Habitat
A. asepala ms is known only from Marvel Loch and Frank Hann National Park, a distance of 180 km between
populations.  A further collection was made by A.J. Hart (1985), however the locality is unknown.  This species grows
on loam or sandy loam in low 
Eucalyptus woodland.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Marvel Loch 
Mer
Yil
-
23.8.79
Scattered
-
2
Frank Hann 
Esp
Rav
NP
13.8.85
Common
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A. asepala ms is common and apparently secure in Frank Hann National Park, however a survey in 1993 failed to
relocate this population (no. 2).  Mollemans 
et al. (1993) unsuccessfully searched for the Marvel Loch population.
This species has the potential to be distributed through largely inaccessible, Vacant Crown Land to the north of Frank
Hann National Park.  Further survey is required.
References
Mollemans 
et al. (1993).

217
Acacia carnosula Maslin ms
MIMOSACEAE
A spreading, domed or more or less straggly shrub, 0.5-1.5 m tall.  Phyllodes ('leaves') are broader towards the mid-
upper section (5-10 x 1-2.5 mm), thick, slightly fleshy, hairless and rounded at the tip; an inconspicuous gland is located
2-4.5 mm above the base.  The light golden heads are globular (3-3.5 mm), 9-11 flowered and borne on stalks (4-6 mm)
with 1 or 2 per node.  Legumes are linear (to 40 x 3.5 mm), hairless, dark-brown and sometimes slightly constricted
between the seeds which are arranged longitudinally.
A. carnosula ms is possibly related to A. profusa which lacks bracteoles in the flower heads, has more linear phyllodes
and seeds arranged sideways in the legume.
Flowering Period:  July - October
Distribution and Habitat
A. carnosula ms is confined to the Caiguna-Eyre-Cocklebiddy area, except for one collection near Israelite Bay, over
200 km south-east.  It grows in calcareous sand, loamy sand or clay loam over limestone pavement, in open shrub or tree
mallee.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Caiguna,S Esp
Dund
VCL
27.8.83
-
-
2a
Cocklebiddy,S Esp
Dund
NR
11.7.74
-
-
2b
Eyre,NNW
Esp
Dund
NR
4.10.74
Scattered
-
2c
Eyre,NW
Esp
Dund
NR
28.8.91
Occasional
-
3
Twilight Cove 
Esp
Dund
NR
9.8.82
-
-
4
Israelite Bay,W 
Esp
Esp
NR
14.8.80
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A. carnosula ms should remain secure in the Nuytsland Nature Reserve.  Further survey is required.

218
Acacia castanostegia Maslin ms
MIMOSACEAE
A rounded, intricate, prickly shrub, 0.7 m tall and 1-2 m diameter.  Branchlets yellow-ribbed.  The phyllodes ('leaves')
are held at right-angles to the stem, rigid, quadrangular (5-30 x 1 mm) with a nerve along the ridge of each angle, and
have a long, sharp spine at the tip.  The globular flower heads (3-5 mm) are cream and 5-flowered.  Legumes are long
and narrow (40-50 x 2-3 mm) and are not contracted between the seeds.
A. castanostegia ms is closely related to A. pachypoda which has the base of the phyllode dilated where it attaches to the
stem.
Flowering Period:  July - October
Distribution and Habitat
A. castanostegia ms is distributed over about 200 km, mainly between Mt Holland and Hatter Hill, with more
widespread populations known from Lake Seabrook (near Koolyanobbing) and near Norseman.  It grows in sand, loam
and lateritic soils, in 
Eucalyptus woodland open scrub or heath communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Lake Seabrook 
Mer
Yil
?VCL
10.9.79
-
-
2
Mt Holland,N 
Mer
Yil
VCL
23.8.79
Common
-
3
Mt Holland,NNW 
Mer
Yil
VCL
30.7.69
-
-
4
North Ironcap,E 
Nar
Kon
VCL
20.10.87
-
-
5
North Ironcap,SE 
Nar
Kon
VCL
11.10.75
Common
-
6
Lake Cronin,W 
Nar
Kon
VCL
2.11.79
Rare
-
7
Forrestania Nar
Kon
VCL
25.7.79
-
-
8
South Ironcap 
Nar
Kon
VCL
8.7.79
Frequent
-
9
Hatter Hill,N 
Esp
Rav
VCL
27.10.92
1
Good
10
Norseman,SE Esp
Dund
VCL
1.4.89
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A. castenostegia ms is widespread, with much of its distribution being in Vacant Crown Land with poor access.
Mollemans 
et al. (1993) suggested that road works along the Southern Cross-Forrestania Road may have affected the
populations north of Mt Holland (populations 2 and 3).  Further survey is warranted.
References
Mollemans 
et al. (1993).

219
Acacia incanicarpa A.R.Chapman & Maslin ms
MIMOSACEAE
A bushy shrub, 1-2.5 m tall.  Phyllodes ('leaves') are narrow-oblong to elliptic (40-75 x 7-14 mm) with a blunt point at
the tip, leathery in texture, silvery grey-green, and have 1 or 3 main nerves with numerous, fine, parallel nerves in
between.  The light golden flowers heads are oblong-shaped (7-10 x 4-5 mm) and borne on stalks (2-3 mm) which are
solitary in axils of the phyllodes.  Legumes are linear (to 100 x 4-5 mm) with the dark brown seeds (3-5 mm) arranged
longitudinally.
A. incanicarpa ms bears some resemblance to A. tarculensis which grows in South Australia.
Flowering Period:  November - January, April
Distribution and Habitat
A. incanicarpa ms is geographically restricted to the Cape Le Grand National Park.  It grows in pockets of loamy sand
on granitic slopes and ridges in open scrub, open heath and low shrubland.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Frenchman Peak 
Esp
Esp
NP
7.10.92
20+
Good
2a
Mt Le Grand 
Esp
Esp
NP
6.10.92
-
-
2b
Cape Le Grand 
Esp
Esp
NP
-
2+
Good
3
'Hill 49'
Esp
Esp
NP
9.11.79
-
-
4*
Lucky Bay 
Esp
Esp
NP
7.10.92
15-30
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A number of small populations of 
A. incanicarpa ms occur in the Cape Le Grand National Park where they should
remain secure.  Further survey is required around granite outcrops in the Park.

220
Acacia kerryana Maslin
MIMOSACEAE
A spreading, rather dense shrub, 50-60 cm tall and up to 2 m diameter.  The smooth, slightly shiny branchlets are
somewhat flexible towards their tips.  Phyllodes ('leaves') are light olive green, long and narrow (8-16 cm x 0.5 mm),
cylindrical, almost grass-like in appearance and often have a curled tip; there are 8 fine, impressed nerves which become
slightly raised on drying; a gland, which is not prominent, occurs on the upper surface of the phyllode some distance
above the base.  The light golden flower heads are shortly oblong (6-7 x 4 mm), 12-15 flowered and borne on stalks (6-
13 mm), with 2-3 in each axil.  Flowers are 4-merous.  Legumes are twisted and coiled (to 8.5 cm) with the margins
constricted between the seeds.
Flowering Period:  October, February
Distribution and Habitat
Acacia kerryana is known from only four localities distributed over 200 km, from Lake Cronin to near Norseman, and
north to Spargoville.  It appears always to be associated with low rocky hills where it grows in granitic loamy sand, red-
brown loam or red clayey loam.  It may occur in association with various other species of 
Acacia, Allocasuarina
campestris, Triodia scariosa and mallee eucalypts. 
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Bremer Range 
Esp
Dund
VCL
28.12.83
-
-
2
Norseman,NE Esp
Dund
-
31.10.80
Scattered
-
3
Spargoville,S Gold
Cool
?VCL
16.2.81
-
-
4
Lake Cronin,NW 
Mer
Yil
VCL
7.10.81
Rare
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
The population north-east of Norseman was not relocated in a survey of the Jimberlana Hill area in November 1992.
Further survey is required.
A. kerryana is not known in any conservation reserve.
References
Maslin (1982).

221
Acacia nitidula Benth.
MIMOSACEAE
A diffuse or bushy shrub, 0.4-2.0 m tall and 0.5-1.0 m wide, which lacks hairs and is occasionally glutinous.  Young
branches are reddish-brown and smooth.  Phyllodes ('leaves') are linear (12-35 mm), rather thick, rigid, prominently 2-
or 3-nerved and have an obtuse or minute callous point.  Flowers heads are small, globular, 12-20 flowered and borne
on slender stalks (4-8 mm) which are usually in pairs in the axils.  Flowers are mostly 5-merous.
Flowering Period:  October
Distribution and Habitat
Acacia nitidula is widespread, with populations known in Cape Arid and Cape Le Grand National Parks, on Middle
Island and west of Ravensthorpe, a range of over 300 km.  It typically grows in shallow loamy sand over granite.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Cape Arid 
Esp
Esp
NP
25.4.93
1 000+
Good
1b*
Barrier Anchorage,S 
Esp
Esp
NP
26.4.93
500+
Good
2
Belinup Hill 
Esp
Esp
NP
26.4.93
100+
Good
3
Middle Island 
Esp
Esp
NR
22.11.73
-
-
4*
Mt Baring 
Esp
Esp
NR
25.4.93
20+
Good
5*
Mt Le Grand 
Esp
Esp
NP
6.10.92
500+
Good
6
Ravensthorpe,W Alb
Rav
-
13.9.71
-
-
* = new population / sub-population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A. nitidula is common on granite complexes in the Cape Arid and Cape Le Grand National Parks where it is secure at
present.  Further survey is required in the Ravensthorpe District, as this population appears anomalous.
References
Bentham (1864).

222
Acacia ophiolithica R.S.Cowan and Maslin 
MIMOSACEAE
A rounded shrub, 0.3 to 2 m tall, with yellowish-green foliage.  Branchlets are smooth and cylindrical to slightly angled.
Phyllodes ('leaves') are bright green, cylindrical (20-45 x 1 mm) with the apex narrowed, crowded, smooth, have 4 or 8
obscure immersed nerves, and a fine oblique spine at the tip.  The golden flower heads are globular (to 3.5 mm), 10-15
flowered, with 2 borne per axil on long stalks (to 13 mm).  Legumes are straight or slightly curved, linear (to 37 mm),
slightly raised over the seeds and have conspicuous, thickened margins.
A. ophiolithica is closely related to A. uncinella which has more phyllode nerves.  A. binata resembles A. ophiolithica
and occurs in the same area; it has 3 obscure nerves, obtuse phyllodes, larger flowers in short 2-headed racemes, and
more or less coiled pods.
Flowering Period:  August - November
Distribution and Habitat
A. ophiolithica is restricted to and locally common on the Jerdacuttup River area, east of Ravensthorpe.  A collection by
Maxwell, last century, was from the Oldfield River area.  It grows in yellow brown sandy clay or loamy clay on or near
rocky riverbanks, in association with mallee shrubland. 
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Ravensthorpe,E Alb
Rav
Rd 
Verge
27.11.81
Dense
-
2
Ravensthorpe Range 
Alb
Rav
VCL
27.10.87
Scattered
-
3
Ravensthorpe,E Alb
Rav
Rd 
Verge
25.9.83
Common
-
4
Kundip,E Alb
Rav
-
11.8.88
-
-
5
Nth Jerdacuttup Rd 
Alb
Rav
-
4.10.83
-
-
6
Mt Desmond,E 
Alb
Rav
-
30.12.83
-
-
7
Oldfield River
?Esp
Rav
-
1800s
-
-
tributary
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A. ophiolithica appears to be common in the Ravensthorpe Range and may occur within the Kundip Nature Reserve.
Negotiations between the Shire, CALM and DEP are in progress to vest the Ravensthorpe Range as a reserve.
References
Robinson and Coates (1995).

223
Acacia profusa Maslin ms
MIMOSACEAE
A compact to open shrub, to 1 m tall.  Branchlets are hairless, sometimes resinous, and yellow-orange in colour.
Phyllodes ('leaves') lack hairs, are linear (7-15 x 1-1.5 mm), narrowed at the base, slightly thickened, with a sharp point
to one side of the tip; a gland exists 0.2-1.5 mm above the base.  The surface of the phyllodes sometimes has a waxy,
powdery secretion (pruinose) giving it a bluish appearance.  The golden flower heads are globular (4.5-5 mm), 10-17
flowered with 1 or 2 borne on a stalk (9-16 mm) in a phyllode axis.  Legumes are oblong to narrowly oblong (to 25 x
10-12 mm) and prominently raised over the seeds alternatively on each side.  Seeds are arranged sideways in the
legume.
Acacia profusa ms resembles variants of A. lachnophylla which can be recognised by branchlets being hairy, the
phyllodes having a distinct mid-nerve and the gland occurring more than 5 mm above the phyllode stalk, and legumes
that are narrow and coiled.

Yüklə 1,44 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   ...   25




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə