Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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Flowering PeriodSeptember
Fruiting Period:  October - November
Distribution and Habitat
Bentleya diminuta is known from one locality, extending from the north-west to the south-west of Mt Ragged.  It grows
in red-brown sand and red sandy clay with calcareous nodules over limestone.  Associated vegetation is usually mallee
which may include 
Eucalyptus cooperiana, E. redunca, E. uncinata, E. tetragona and Melaleuca pentagona.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Ragged,W 
Esp
Esp
NP
24.4.93
2 000+
Post-fire
Response to Disturbance
In April 1993, 
B. diminuta was observed resprouting after a hot burn in February 1991.  Rosettes were most abundant
along the verge of the track; those away from the track tended to be beneath or close to mallees.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
All known collections are from a limited area along roadsides within the Cape Arid National Park.  Additional
populations may exist in the surrounding region, which has not been surveyed (Crisp and Taylor 1990).  Further survey
is recommended.
References
Crisp and Taylor (1990).

235
Boronia coriacea Paul G.Wilson 
RUTACEAE
A small shrub, about 50 cm tall.  Young branches have faint glandular-warty projections and are covered in minute soft
hairs in two opposite sunken grooves, otherwise the plant is hairless.  Leaves (10-50 mm) have 3 or 5 leaflets which are
narrow, broader towards the apex than the base (12 x 1-5 mm), flat, thick and have a slightly rounded apex.  Pink
flowers are borne in clusters at the ends of branches on stalks (3 mm); the 4 petals (5 mm) overlap each other at the
base. 
Boronia coriacea resembles B. inornata which can be distinguished by its linear-cylindrical leaflets and the youngest
branches which lack the two sunken grooves filled with short hairs.
Flowering Period:  April, October - November
Distribution and Habitat
B. coriacea is known from only a restricted area of about 15 km along the scarp west of Israelite Bay.  It grows in
shallow calcareous soil ('marl') over limestone both in sand-heath and in mallee vegetation.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Gora Road 
Esp
Esp
NP
4.10.70
-
-
2a
Sheoaks Hill,SE 
Esp
Esp
NR
21.4.93
500+
Good
2b
Sheoaks Hill,SE
Esp
Esp
NR
21.4.93
10+
Good
3
Tooklejenna Rock,N 
Esp
Esp
NR
20.4.93
1 000+
Good
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
B. coriacea is restricted geographically, although within its known range it is relatively common and secure.  
All the known collections are from a limited area along tracks within the Nuytsland Nature Reserve.  Additional
populations may exist along the escarpment, which has not been surveyed.  Monitoring is required.
References
Wilson (1971).

236
Caesia viscida Keighery
ANTHERICACEAE
A perennial herb to 30 cm tall and 30 cm wide, arising from a shortly-branched rhizome, with 6-20 flowering shoots
produced annually.  The rhizome is covered by dense brown fibres.  Roots are white and tuberous below the rhizome to
about 5 mm diameter, becoming slender at depth.  Leaves are erect, without hairs and sticky; the blades (150-300 x 5-6
mm) are channelled, with 6-8 prominent veins; the apex has a long, stiff sharp point.  Flower heads are short (60-100
mm) and spreading with a white axis and 3-6 branches (to 60 mm); the lowest bract, situated below the branches, is leaf-
like and sticky.  Flowers (4-6 mm) have 3 outer perianth segments that are brown-green on the outside and white inside,
3 white inner perianth segments and the stamens in 2 whorls; staminal filaments are flattened, anthers are yellow; the
ovary is green (1 mm) and the style white.  Capsular fruits are 3-lobed (4-5 mm) and green when mature.  Seeds (1.5
mm) are very shiny and black, with a large, fleshy appendage (aril) which is white with a black margin.
Flowering Period:  November
Distribution and Habitat
Caesia viscida is known only from the site where it was originally collected in Cape Arid National Park.  It grows in
Banksia speciosa shrubland on low sand dunes.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Tagon Bay Rd 
Esp
Esp
NP
23.11.93
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
A search in the general area of the known population failed to find any plants in April 1993.  The vegetation and habitat
where this species grows also occurs in the Nuytsland Nature Reserve and nearby Cape Le Grand National Park
(Keighery 1990).  Further survey is required.
References
Keighery (1990).

237
Calandrinia porifera Syeda
PORTULACACEAE
A succulent herb with numerous flowering stems, 3-9 cm long arising from the basal tuft of leaves.  Leaves are many at
the base in a tuft, as well as on the upper part of the flowering stems, obovate (1-3.5 x 1-1.3 mm), and opposite or
alternate.  Flowers are borne on stalks (3-5 mm) which have small, opposite bracts; sepals are broad-ovate (1.5-2 x 2-2.5
mm) and thin; the 5 petals are narrow-elliptic (1-2 x 0.4-1 mm); the 5-7 stamens have their filaments united at the base
to form a ring around the ovary; the globular ovary is translucent and has 4 stigmata (0.3 mm) which are free to the base.
The capsule opens by a single pore to release about 10 red-brown, glossy seeds (0.3 x 0.2 mm).
Flowering Period:  October
Distribution and Habitat
Calandrinia porifera is known only from a few widely distributed localities, between Boorabbin and Fitzgerald River
National Park, a distance of about 300 km.  Inland, this species grows on skeletal soils of inner aprons of granite rocks,
and towards the coast it grows along rivers.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last No. 
of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Cascades Rd 
Esp
Esp
Private &
10.10.68
-
-
?NR
9.9.93
Not found
-
2
Cundeelee Mission 
Gold
Bldr
AR
1967
-
-
3
Boorabbin Gold
Cool
NP
1988
-
-
4
Jilbadgi Mer
Yil
NR
1988
-
-
5
Fitzgerald River 
Alb
?Rav
NP
1988
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The majority of sightings have been by K. Newbey (personal communication) who states ".. while the taxon is not
common, I feel that I have probably seen enough plants in conservation areas to suggest that it should be 'safe'".
Newbey also indicates that this taxon flowers prolifically, with a moderate to high seed set, suggesting that the soil seed
bank should be adequate for long term survival.
In spring 1993, a survey for the population on the edge of the Nature Reserve (pop. no. 1), failed to locate this species.
The population may have been cleared for agriculture.  The three populations referred to by K. Newbey (personal
communication) are not represented in the Western Australian Herbarium.  Further survey is required.
References
Syeda (1980).

238
Calochilus sp. Hopetoun (H.Taylor s.n.)
ORCHIDACEAE
Mallee Beard Orchid
An orchid with insignificant leaves that are reduced to a tiny bract.  The dorsal and lateral sepals (to 5 mm) are bluntly
pointed and pale green with dark red stripes.  The petals and column are similarly coloured and contained within the
sepals.  The small flowers (5-15 mm) are cup-like, appear to self-pollinate, and rarely have more than one flower (of a
spike of 10-12 flowers) open at a time.
This orchid has affinity to 
Calochilus campestris.  In Western Australia, there are three species of Calochilus
recognised, all of which are undescribed.  
C. sp. Hopetoun is distinguished from C. aff. robertsonii by having a shorter
labellum and shorter labellum hairs.
Flowering Period:  August - October
Distribution and Habitat
C. sp. Hopetoun is known from three widely separated localities, at Point Charles, Hopetoun and near Eyre, a range of
650 km.  It grows in calcareous sand in coastal scrub communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Hopetoun Alb
Rav
VCL
26.10.92
30
Vulnerable
2
Point Charles 
Alb
Rav
NP
22.10.92
5
-
3
Eyre Esp
Esp
NR
10.93
3
Good
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
In 1992, the Fitzgerald River National Park Association received a grant from the Gordon Reid Foundation to search for
this orchid.  They were unsuccessful in finding more populations, despite extensive surveys through the Park.  The
recent discovery of a few plants both at Point Charles and near Eyre, suggests that this taxon may be more widespread
than originally believed.  There are unconfirmed reports of 
C. sp. Hopetoun occurring at Chillinup Rd (Albany District),
near West Mt Barren, and north of Cape Le Grand.  Further survey is required.
References
Esperance Express 11 Aug. 1992, Hoffman and Brown (1992), Robinson and Coates (1995).

239
Chthonocephalus multiceps J.H.Willis
ASTERACEAE
A semi-prostrate, rosetted annual herb, about 7 cm tall.  Basal leaves are broadest towards the tip (oblanceolate, 25 mm)
and slightly hairy; uppermost leaves are obovate (3-5 mm), hairy, with long hairs at the tip.  The compound flower heads
are very numerous (to 40 per plant), globular and of varying sizes (5-12 mm diam.), congested and lack stalks.  The 4-7
inner involucral bracts are hairless, whereas the outer bract is covered in long hairs.  The tubular florets (2-2.5 mm) have
5 conspicuous lobes; uppermost florets have a hairy subtending scale and reduced pappus.  The achene (0.5-0.8 mm) is
triquetrous.  The style (0.5-1 mm) is divided at the tip.
The genus 
Chthonocephalus was revised by Short (1990) who concluded that the taxon C. multiceps should be excluded
from 
Chthonocephalus as it differs in features of the fruit and bracts from the rest of the genus.  The taxon is more
closely related to 
Calocephalus aervoides which occurs on the Houtman Abrolhos Islands, and Short (1990) considers
both taxa should probably be referred to a separate genus.
Flowering Period:  August - September
Distribution and Habitat
Chthonocephalus multiceps was first collected from the Balladonia homestead in 1947, and has only been collected
from one other locality about 65 km to the west, near Boingaring Rocks.  It grows in granitic, loamy sand over granite
bedrock, associated with ephemeral 
Helipterum species.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Balladonia Homestead 
Esp
Dund
Pastoral Lease
31.8.47
-
-
2
Boingaring Rocks,ESE 
Esp
Dund
NR
11.9.80
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
Although
 C. multiceps appears to be rare, Willis (1952) reports, "it is only to be expected that it will prove to have a
wide distribution in the botanically little-known south-eastern part of Western Australia."  The Boingaring Rocks
population is in a very remote part of the Dundas Nature Reserve and is unlikely to be disturbed.  Further taxonomic
work and survey are required.
References
Short (1990), Willis (1952).

240
Comesperma lanceolatum (R.Br.) Benth.
POLYGALACEAE
A small, erect shrub (milkwort), less than 15 cm tall, with slender, hairless stems which may lie on the ground at the
base.  Leaves are small, narrow-linear (4-6 mm), rather rigid, with pointed tips.  Flowers are blue, pea-like with 2 wings
and a keel, and borne in short clusters (racemes) at the ends of the stems.  Individual flowers have 5 oblong, thin sepals
(4 mm).  The fruit is an elliptical capsule (6 x >2 mm) that tapers rather more at the base than the tip.  Seeds are oblong
(3 mm) and have a tuft of long hair at the tip.
Flowering Period:  November - December
Distribution and Habitat
Comesperma lanceolatum is widespread along the south coast, from near Beaufort Inlet to near Cape Le Grand, a
distance of about 320 km.  It grows in near-coastal sandplain in siliceous white sand or deep white sands over sandy
clays, in mixed tall shrubland on quartzite ridges, on dunes, or on the plains near wet areas.  It may be associated with
Banksia.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Woodup Swamp,NE 
Esp
Esp
Unvested Res.
30.12.89
28
-
2
Woolbernup Alb
Rav
NP
21.11.85
Rare
-
3
Cape Riche,NW 
Alb
?Jer
?Unvested Res.
1.12.74
-
-
4
No. 2 Rabbit Proof 
Alb
?Jer
-
30.11.60
-
-
Fence
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Collections of this species were made last century by Robert Brown from the "South coast, east of King George's
Sound" (Bentham 1863), and by Maxwell "on fairly wet plains near Warriup" (Mueller in Leigh 
et al. 1984).
K. Newbey (personal communication) has recorded it from areas east of Cape Riche to at least Hopetoun, with a few
plants occurring in the Fitzgerald River National Park; at all localities it was rare.  More recently, a population has been
found south-east of Mt Merivale.  Further survey is required, particularly in Cape Le Grand National Park.
References
Bentham (1863), Leigh 
et al. (1984), Robinson and Coates (1995).

241
Conospermum filifolium subsp. sigmoideum E.M.Benn. ms
PROTEACEAE
The typical form of 
Conospermum filifolium is white, whereas subsp. sigmoideum ms has pale blue flowers.
Flowering Period:  August - September
Distribution and Habitat
C. filifolium subsp. sigmoideum ms is known only from two areas over 200 km apart; one in Frank Hann National Park
and the other near North Tarin Rock.  It grows in yellow sand in heath communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Frank Hann 
Esp
Rav
NP
17.9.93
50+
Good
2
Frank Hann 
Esp
Dund
NP
17.9.93
20
Good
3a
Nth Tarin Rock 
Kat
Dum
NR
13.9.75
-
-
3b
Kukerin,N
Kat
Dum
-
16.10.83
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Further survey is required.

242
Dampiera decurrens Rajput & Carolin
GOODENIACEAE
A stiff, robust perennial to 1 m tall, with narrowly winged stems.  Leaves are without stalks, ovate-elliptic with a broad
base (12-40 x 5-23 mm) and have a toothed margin.  Clusters of flowers (cymes) have up to 3 branches together (60
mm) each bearing to 12 flowers borne on stalks (3.5-5.2 mm).  The sepals are almost obsolete.  The deep blue corolla
(to 12 mm) has fine grey hairs on the outside and broad wings (3.5-4 mm wide) on the lobes.  The ovary is bilocular (4
mm) and shiny.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
Dampiera decurrens occurs on the south coast from Two Peoples Bay eastwards to the Cape Le Grand National Park.  It
grows on skeletal soils on granite outcrops near the coast.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Lucky Bay 
Esp
Esp
NP
7.10.92
10
Good
2
Frenchman Peak 
Esp
Esp
NP
7.10.92
2+
Good
3
Cape Le Grand 
Esp
Esp
NP
6.10.66
-
-
4
Hellfire Bay 
Esp
Esp
NP
14.11.76
-
-
5*
Thistle Cove,E 
Esp
Esp
NP
7.10.92
10+
Good
6*
Lucky Bay Rd 
Esp
Esp
NP
8.10.92
5+
Good
7
Sandy Hook Is.
Esp
Esp
-
10.11.50
-
-
8
Mt Gardner 
Alb
Alb
NR
1800s
-
-
9
Cheyne Beach 
Alb
Alb
-
1800s
-
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
D. decurrens has a very restricted habitat and range in the Cape Le Grand National Park, with individual plants usually
being widely scattered.  Current information indicates that this plant is rare, but should be secure in the National Park.  
The populations occurring in the Albany District were collected by George Maxwell about 100 years ago, and have not
been collected since.  Further survey of granite outcrops along the south coast is required.
References
Rajput and Carolin (1988, 1992).

243
Dampiera orchardii Rajput & Carolin
GOODENIACEAE
An herbaceous perennial with erect, ribbed stems which are covered in short, matted golden-yellowish hairs when
young, but become hairless with maturity; the nodes have a tuft of whitish hairs.  Leaves are oblong-elliptic (0.5-1.5 x
0.6 mm) and have a wide base without stalks.  Flowers are solitary or in clusters (cymes).  Short, golden-yellow hairs
cover the flower stalks (1 mm), the bracteoles (usually 2) and the sepals (0.2-0.5 x 0.3 mm).  The corolla lobes (about 4
mm) and ovary have short yellowish hairs on the outside; the style and indusium are hairless.  Fruits (4-5 mm) are hairy.
Dampiera orchardii is possibly closely related to D. tenuicaulis which is a small, slender-stemmed shrub with bright
blue flowers (the corolla being about 10 mm long) which are covered on the outside with dense, dark, stellate hairs.
Flowering Period:  October
Distribution and Habitat
D. orchardii is known to occur south of Newdegate and north-west of Cascade on a fault line near the upper reaches of
the Young River, growing with 
Glishrocaryon, Dodonaea and sedges.  This taxon has also been collected between
"Lake King and Ravensthorpe" and "towards Tone River".  
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Young River 
Esp
Esp
-
21.10.68
-
-
2
Newdegate,S Kat
LG
-
4.11.65
-
-
3
Lake King-Ravensthorpe
-
-
-
7.11.63
-
-
4
Towards Tone River
-
-
-
1880
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Extensive land clearing for agriculture has been carried out through the general area described by A. Orchard (personal
communication) where this species is thought to occur and since the specimen was collected near the Young River in
1968.  Further survey is urgently required.
D. orchardii is not known to occur in any conservation reserve.
References
Rajput and Carolin (1988).

244
Darwinia luehmannii F.Muell. & Tate
MYRTACEAE
A low spreading, domed shrub, 15-25 cm tall and 0.25-1 m wide.  Leaves are crowded on the stem, dull grey-green,
slightly succulent and triangular (2-7 x 1 mm).  Heads of 12-15 flowers are borne at the ends of branches; the lower part
of the calyx tube has square markings (tessellated), while the upper part has minute, pimple-like protuberances; calyx-
lobes are less than half the length of the yellow-green petals; styles are also yellow-green and extend about 6 mm beyond
the petals.

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