Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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Flowering Period:  May, August - November
Distribution and Habitat
Darwinia luehmannii occurs to the north-west and north-east of Mt Heywood.  It grows in white or yellow sand or
orange-brown sandy loam around the margins of salt lakes or in depressions, in open woodland or in 
Melaleuca shrub
communities, associated with 
M. fissurata or M. uncinata.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Sheoak Hill,ESE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
29.9.83
-
-
2a*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
1
Good
2b
Clyde Hill,NW
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
1 000+
Good
2c*
Clyde Hill,NW
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
2 000+
Good
2d*
Clyde Hill,NW
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
1 000+
Good
3
Mt Heywood 
Esp
Esp
VCL
1.9.84
-
-
4
Mt Heywood,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
500+
Good
21.5.93
1 000s Seedl.
Post-fire
5a*
Mt Heywood,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
100+
Good
5b*
Mt Heywood,NW
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
100+
Good
5c*
Mt Heywood,NW
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
50+
Good
5d*
Mt Heywood,NW
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
500+
Good
* = new population / sub-population
Response to Disturbance
Thousands of seedlings were observed at population 4 two years after a wildfire in January 1991.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
D. luehmannii is common around salt lakes and in low depressions in Crown Land to the north of Mt Heywood.
References
Blackall and Grieve (1980).

245
Darwinia sp. Peak Charles (A.S.George 10627)
MYRTACEAE
A shrub, 1.7 m tall.  Petals white turning red.  
Flowering Period:  April
Distribution and Habitat
This 
Darwinia species is known only from Peak Charles, where it grows in granitic loam.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Peak Charles 
Esp
Esp
NP
10.4.71
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Peak Charles and the surrounding area was burnt by a hot fire in January 1991.  The species was not relocated during a
survey of the area in September 1993.  Further survey is required.

246
Daviesia campephylla Crisp
PAPILIONACEAE
A low, spreading, often domed shrub, 0.15-0.35 m tall and 0.3-1.0 m wide, which often reproduces by suckers.
Phyllodes ('leaves') are spirally arranged, cylindrical or slightly flattened (6-12 x 1-2 mm); the upper edge is usually
slightly dilated just below the apex giving an allusion of a green caterpillar rearing from the branches, the apex has a
sharp spine on the side pointing outwards.  Clusters (racemes) of 1-5 flowers are borne on short stalks (1-3 mm) in the
upper axils.  The calyx (3-4 mm) has the 2 upper lobes united in a truncate lip, the lower 3 lobes are broadly triangular
(1 mm).  The yellow corolla has a large upright petal (standard, 5-7 x 7 mm) and incurved wings; stamens are arranged
in 2 whorls of 5 each.  Pods are triangular (6-7 x 3.5 mm) and slightly inflated.
Flowering Period:  November
Distribution and Habitat
Daviesia campephylla is known only from an area of about 15 km, to the north of Cascade.  It grows in yellow sandy
clay loam with some lateritic gravel, in open shrub mallee and dwarf scrub vegetation.  Associated species include
Eucalyptus transcontinentalis, E. forrestiana, Melaleuca uncinata, M. pentagona and M. subtrigona.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Griffiths Rd &
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
2 000+
Good
1b
Edwards Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
12.9.92
5 000+
Good
2
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
1 000+
Good
3a*
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
}
12.9.92
500+
Good
3b*
Rolland Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res. }
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Current information indicates that 
D. campephylla has a very restricted geographical range, although it is common
within that area.  It occurs in two Nature Reserves and should remain secure.  
Studies to determine the reproduction biology and the response of 
D. campephylla to fire should be undertaken, so that
appropriate management can be carried out in the Nature Reserves.
References
Burgman (1985b), Newbey (1983).

247
Daviesia pauciflora Crisp
PAPILIONACEAE
A slender, diffuse, rush-like shrub, 30-80 cm tall.  The erect branchlets are initially compressed then become cylindrical
and ribbed.  The dull green phyllodes ('leaves') are spirally arranged, long and very narrow (50-400 x 1 mm), resemble
the branchlets, have 3 prominent ribs and a sharp, spiny tip.  Flowers are small, yellow streaked red and usually borne in
1-4 pairs on stalks (both peduncle and pedicel 2-3 mm long) in the axils of leaves.  The calyx (4-5 mm) is somewhat
flared at the top and the lobes are very short; ribs are lacking.  The corolla has a broadly elliptic upright petal (standard,
8 x 10 mm) which is mostly yellow with red towards the centre and an intense yellow oblong marking at the centre; the
wings are twisted so the apices form a 'V' which is open on the lower side, very dark red with yellow tips; the keel (5 x 2
mm) is dark red.  The free stamens are arranged in 2 whorls.  The shiny ovary has 2 ovules.  Pods are roughly triangular-
shaped (11-14 x 6 mm).  Seed is pale yellow mottled black.
Flowering Period:  October - November, ?January
Distribution and Habitat
Daviesia pauciflora occurs between Munglinup and Gibson and extends northwards to near Cascade, with a range of
about 70 km.  It grows in deep white sand or sand over laterite in shrub mallee and heath communities.  Associated
genera may include 
Melaleuca, Lambertia, Adenanthos, Allocasuarina and Banksia.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Cascades Rd 
Esp
Esp
Private
16.10.68
-
-
2
Munglinup,E 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
8.1.79
-
-
3
Barker Inlet,NNE 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
8.1.79
Frequent
-
4
Dalyup 
Esp
Esp
?MRWA Rd Res.
24.11.64
-
-
5
Cascades Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
9.10.84
-
-
6
Gibson,NW Esp
Esp
-
8.12.68
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown, but is probably a disturbance opportunist.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
D. pauciflora is poorly known and possibly rare, although the habitat where it grows is relatively common to the west of
Esperance.  Populations occurring along the South Coast Highway (pop. nos. 2, 3 and 4) are extremely vulnerable.  In
1993, surveys  for population 3 along the South Coast Highway failed to relocate this species; the MRWA road reserves
in the vicinity are very degraded and choked with weeds, particularly exotic grasses.  Surveys in the Cascades area
during spring 1992 failed to locate any populations of this taxon.  

248
Summary and Recommendations (cont’d)
The occurrence of 
D. pauciflora in Nature Reserve No. 31745, should afford this species some security, however the
size of the population is unknown.  This species has not been collected for ten years; further survey is urgently required.
References
Crisp (1991).

249
Dillwynia acerosa S.Moore
PAPILIONACEAE
An erect shrub to 40 cm tall.  Leaves are rigid, linear (3-4 x 0.5 mm), grooved and have an obtuse tip; the margins curve
backwards towards the midrib (revolute).  Solitary flowers are borne on stalks (1-2 mm) in axils of the uppermost leaves
(short corymb); the bracteoles are minute (1 mm).  The calyx tube (5 mm) is shortly-hairy with acute, short lobes; the 2
upper lobes are united to about the middle.  The corolla has a large upright petal (6 mm diameter) which is orange with
purple streaks; the wings and keel are equal in length (7 mm); the keel is purple with tips that are rounded and slightly
indented.
Flowering Period:  August
Distribution and Habitat
This name has been misapplied to specimens in the Western Australian Herbarium.  No specimens of this taxon are
currently known in Perth.
The type was collected "[near] Coolgardie" last century (Moore 1898).  Currently, the name 
Dillwynia acerosa has been
applied to a taxon which is known only to occur in South Australia.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Taxonomic work is urgently required on the genus 
Dillwynia (R. Cranfield, personal communication).  Examination of
the type specimen of 
D. acerosa is needed before further field survey is carried out on this species.
References
Moore (1898).

250
Elachanthus pusillus F.Muell.
ASTERACEAE
A small, multi-branched annual herb, 1-6 cm tall, which is covered with minute hairs.  Leaves are alternate, narrow-
linear (about 10 mm).  Flower heads are distinct, have greenish to pale yellow tubular florets only and occur at the ends
of branches.  The green, involucral bracts are obovate (4-5 mm), often with long hairs (cilia) on the rounded apex, are
arranged in 2 rows, and enclose about two-thirds of the flower head.  Pappus scales are numerous (12-15), short, flat,
lanceolate and minutely toothed like a saw.  Fertile achenes are silky-hairy at the base.
Flowering Period:  August - October
Distribution and Habitat
Elachanthus pusillus is known from only three localities, 500 km apart, from east of Salmon Gums to near Cocklebiddy.
A collection was made 100 years ago from Kalgoorlie.  Near Cocklebiddy, this species grows in red loam over
limestone on saline flats, in an 
Atriplex and Halosarcia shrubland.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Orchid Rocks 
Esp
Esp
VCL
10.83
-
-
2
Cocklebiddy,E Esp
Dund
NR
1.10.81

000+
-
3
Kalgoorlie Gold
?Kal
-
8.1898
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The population east of Cocklebiddy should remain secure in the Nuytsland Nature Reserve. 
The distance between the two most recent collections suggest that there may be other populations between them.
Further survey is required.
References
Burgman (1985b), Grieve and Blackall (1982).

251
Eremophila lactea Chinnock
MYOPORACEAE
An erect, compact or spindly shrub, 1-3.5 m tall, often weeping when old.  Branches are ribbed towards the apex and
prominently white-blotched in the upper parts, the blotches consisting of a dried exudate.  Leaves are without stalks,
alternate, elliptic (10-31 x 2-6 mm), overlapping and normally obscuring the branch, somewhat shiny, and sticky when
young.  Lilac flowers are borne on flattened stalks (2-3 mm) with 3 or 4 per axil; sepals are oblong-shaped (3-6 x 1 mm).
The 2-lipped corolla (8-13 mm) is very pale lilac and densely glandular-hairy outside, while inside the tube is deeper
lilac, purple spotted and beset with long soft hairs; the 4 stamens lack hairs; the ovary is densely hairy except for the
swollen base which is hairless.  The fruit is elongated egg-shaped (3-3.5 x 1.5-2 mm) and covered with long, silky hairs.
Flowering Period:  November - March
Distribution and Habitat
Eremophila lactea is known from an area covering approximately 15 km, which is located about 40 km west of Grass
Patch.  It grows on disturbed roadside areas on light grey-brown sandy loam in very open shrub mallee.  Associated
species include 
Eucalyptus transcontinentalis, E. longicornis, E. flocktoniae, Melaleuca depressa and Eremophila
chamaephila.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2

Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Williams Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
20.9.93
350
Vulnerable
1b
Williams Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
20.9.93
7
Fair
1c
Grass Patch W Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
20.9.93
200
Vulnerable
1d
Grass Patch W Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
20.9.93
20
Fair
2
Williams Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
-
Low numbers
-
20.9.93
Not found
-
3
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
-
200
-
20.9.93
Not found
-
Response to Disturbance
A relatively short-lived, opportunistic species which is most abundant after disturbance.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
Much of the area where 
E. lactea is distributed has been cleared for agriculture; subsequently most of the known
populations occur on road verges.  R. Chinnock (personal communication) states that 
E. lactea has vanished from some
sites where it was previously known.  Monitoring of known populations is critical.
Summary and Recommendations (cont’d)
                                                          

 1999 status: Declared Rare Flora

252
This species is in cultivation in South Australia (R. Chinnock, personal communication).
Research to determine the reproductive biology of 
E. lactea is urgently required.  Maintenance clearing of road verges
before plants set seed could endanger the long-term survival of 
E. lactea.  Road markers are recommended.  Further
survey is urgently required.
References
Chinnock (1985).

253
Eriostemon apiculatus Paul G.Wilson
RUTACEAE
A shrub, 0.5-1.5 m tall, which is without hairs or only finely-hairy.  Leaves are green, narrow, club-shaped (4-8 mm),
warty-glandular with a conspicuous black, shortly pointed tip.  Creamy white flowers (1-4) are borne in a cluster,
surrounded by foliage leaves, at the ends of branches.  Flower stalks are thick (0.5-1.5 mm long).  Sepals are narrow
(1.5-2 mm long), fleshy and have a black tip; petals are narrow-oblong (6 mm) with short hairs on the inside and
towards the margin outside.  Stamens (3-4 mm) are hairy, whereas the style lacks hairs; the ovary has a sparsely hairy
apex.
Flowering PeriodSeptember - November
Distribution and Habitat
Eriostemon apiculatus occurs in the Norseman-Widgiemooltha area, distributed over about 100 km.  It is apparently
confined to outcrops of ultrabasic rocks, growing in red-brown loam as an undershrub in open woodland, associated
with 
Eucalyptus flocktoniae, E. torquata, E. stricklandii or E. salubris.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Norseman Esp
Dund
-
17.9.65
-
-
2
Red,White,Blue Esp
Dund
-
19.11.92
15+
Good
3
Brockway Timber 
Esp
Dund
Reserve
19.11.92
1 000+
Good
4*
Coach Rd Heritage 
Esp
Dund
?VCL
19.11.92
1
Average
5
Peninsula Esp
Dund
-
30.8.67
-
-
6
Widgie No. 3
Gold
Cool
-
1.10.90
-
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The
 Eriostemon apiculatus habitat appears to coincide with mining tenements, although at least one of the mines is not
working at present, i.e. the 'Peninsula'.  Further survey is required.
References
Wilson (1970).

254
Eucalyptus fraseri subsp. melanobasis Brooker ms
MYRTACEAE
A small to medium-sized tree, to 15 m tall, with a hard black stocking (2-3 m) at the base and smooth grey bark above.  
This undescribed taxon is closely related to 
Eucalyptus fraseri subsp. fraseri which has smooth bark.  Adult leaves are
lanceolate, alternate, glossy, green to dark green and the same colour on both sides; veins are dense with very irregular,
intersectional oil glands.  Unbranched clusters of 7 flowers are borne on angular stalks.  Buds are with or without short,
stout stalks, egg-shaped; bud caps are conical and usually ribbed; stamens in the bud are first erect then strongly turned
downwards.  Flowers are white.  Fruits are cup-shaped, lack stalks, have a thick rim and a descending disc.  Seed is
lustrous, red-brown and flattish with a shallow network of veins.
Flowering Period:  ?March - April
Distribution and Habitat
E. fraseri subsp. melanobasis ms is known only in the Fraser Range area, where it grows on red calcareous loam.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Fraser Range 
Esp
Dund
Pastoral Lease,
20.11.93
3 000+
Healthy
MRWA Rd Res.
& ?VCL
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. fraseri subsp. melanobasis ms appears to be geographically restricted, although locally abundant in the Fraser Range.
It is not known in any conservation reserve.  Liaison with the lessees of Fraser Range Station is required, to determine
the range of this taxon.  Management of pastoral activities may be necessary to ensure establishment of young cohorts of
trees.
References
Brooker and Kleinig (1990).

255
Eucalyptus litorea Brooker & Hopper
MYRTACEAE
A mallee to 6 m tall, with rough, hard bark with shallow, longitudinal furrows at the base, and smooth grey over cream
bark above.  Juvenile leaves are blue-green. Adult leaves are alternating, lanceolate (to 120 x 35 mm) tapering to a long
narrow point, and slightly glossy, green; veins are dense with scattered, irregular intersectional oil glands, or sometimes
apparently glandless.  Clusters of 7 flowers are borne on stout, flattened stalks (peduncles, 10-15 mm); buds are broadly
stalked (pedicellate), elongate egg-shaped (9-11 x 5-6 mm), and sometimes ribbed; bud caps are contracted to form a
beak.  Flowers are creamy-white.  The fruit is cup-shaped to cylindrical (8-10 x 7-9 mm), sometimes ribbed, has a thick
rim and a descending disc, and 3 or 4 valves.  Seed is brown, shallowly pyramidal with the under side ribbed.
This species is related to 
Eucalyptus rigens, which has 3-flowered inflorescences, and E. famelica which has smooth
bark only.  Neither of these species occur in the Israelite Bay area.
Flowering Period:  April - May
Distribution and Habitat
E. litorea is known from near Israelite Bay and north-west of Mt Baring, a distribution of 65 km.  It grows in yellowish
sand around salt lakes, on the lee side of coastal dunes, and in shallow sandy loam over granite. 
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Daringdella Lake 
Esp
Esp
NR
6.9.84
-
-
2
Israelite Bay 
Esp
Esp
NR
20.4.93
1 000+
Good
3*
Point Malcolm Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
20.4.93
500+
Good
4
Mt Baring,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
11.10.83
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* = new population

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