Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
L. multiflorus is known to occur in three National Parks (Cape Arid, Cape Le Grand and Fitzgerald River).  It is frequent
on near-shore granite slopes in the Cape Le Grand National Park and is not immediately threatened.  A fire burnt Mt
Arid in January 1991; resurvey of this population (no. 5) is recommended, to determine the response of 
L. multiflorus to
fire.  Further survey is required.
References
Bentham (1869), Blackall and Grieve (1981).

277
Leucopogon pleurandroides F.Muell.
EPACRIDACEAE
An erect, open shrub 0.3-1.0 m tall, with numerous branches from the base.  Leaves are broadly oblong (2.5-4 x 1.5-2
mm), thick and have a distinct stalk (2 mm); the upper surface is dull green and minutely hairy, while the under side is
paler and has 2 longitudinal furrows.  The white flowers are in dense clusters at the ends of branches.  Sepals are brown,
less than half the length of the corolla-tube, and have hairy margins; the corolla tube (3-4 mm) is white turning orange
when dry, anthers are attached above the middle on the inside and lack sterile tips; the ovary is very hairy, 1-celled and
has a long, slender, hairy style.
Flowering Period:  April
Distribution and Habitat
Leucopogon pleurandroides was first collected by George Maxwell last century at "Moirs Inlet", which is most likely
Stokes Inlet, however no other collections have been made there.  Otherwise, it is known from three widespread
localities, distributed over about 270 km, near Starvation Boat Harbour, west of Cascade, and north-west of Sheoaks
Hill in the Cape Arid National Park.  It grows on fine calcareous loam (marl) in open woodland and low shrub in
association with 
Banksia media, Nematolepis phebalioides, Styphelia hainesii and Melaleuca spp.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
?Stokes Inlet 
Esp
Esp
NP
1800s
-
-
2
Starvation Boat Harbour
Esp
Rav
Shire Res.
8.9.93
100+
Post-dist.
3
Cheadanup Esp
Rav
NR
26.3.83
-
-
4*
Sheoaks Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
NP
22.4.93
2 000+
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
The discovery of a large population in Cape Arid National Park during a survey in autumn 1993 suggests that this taxon
may be more widespread than implied by the collections to date.  Further survey is required.
References
Bentham (1869), Blackall and Grieve (1981).

278
Leucopogon rotundifolius R.Br.
EPACRIDACEAE
An erect, bushy shrub, to 1 m tall.  Leaves are erect or spreading, spoon-shaped (spathulate, 6-12 x 3-5 mm), obtuse or
with a small callous point, flat or slightly concave, stalked, pale green and have margins that are translucent.  Small, pale
yellow-green flowers are borne with 1 to 3 on a short stalk in the axils of leaves.  The bracteoles are short and the sepals
are less than half the length of the corolla tube; the corolla lobes are long and eventually curve backwards to the sepals.
Anthers are attached above the middle of the tube and are without sterile tips; the ovary is 5-celled and tapers into a
rather long style.
Flowering Period:  January
Distribution and Habitat
Leucopogon rotundifolius occurs between Arid Bay and Cape Le Grand National Park, and on Middle Island.  It grows
in shallow sandy soils on near-shore granite outcrops in coastal scrub, and on deeper sand in open heath scrub.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Arid Bay 
Esp
Esp
NP
12.6.85
Common
-
2a
Lucky Bay 
Esp
Esp
NP
21.1.66
-
-
2b
Frenchman Peak,N
Esp
Esp
NP
18.11.79
-
-
2c
Mt Le Grand
Esp
Esp
NP
6.10.92
200+
Good
2d
Le Grand Beach,N
Esp
Esp
NP
9.10.92
3
Good
2e
Thistle Cove
Esp
Esp
NP
7.10.92
20+
Good
2f*
Hellfire Bay
Esp
Esp
NP
7.10.92
50+
Good
3a
Duke of Orleans Bay
Esp
Esp
Shire Recr. Res.
17.7.82
Common
-
3b
Duke of Orleans Bay
Esp
Esp
Shire Recr. Res.
18.7.82
Common
-
4
Middle Island 
Esp
Esp
NR
22.11.73
-
-
* = new sub-population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
L. rotundifolius is very common in the Cape Le Grand National Park, occurring on most of the granite outcrops.  As
well, it grows in the Cape Arid National Park and on a Nature Reserve, where it should remain secure.
References
Bentham (1869), Blackall and Grieve (1981).

279
Levenhookia pulcherrima Carlquist 
STYLIDIACEAE
Beautiful Stylewort
A small, erect annual herb, 3-5 cm tall, with red stems and very glandular herbage.  Flowers are rose to pale pink with
large and markedly notched corolla lobes; the upper corolla lobes have W-shaped red markings near the base; the
corolla tube is longer than the calyx lobes.  The stout, erect column is covered by a sensitive hood-like labellum that
springs away and downwards when touched releasing the column and anthers.  The stigmas are dissimilar; the lower one
is straight while the upper is curved backwards towards the tube.
Flowering Period:  October - November
Distribution and Habitat
Levenhookia pulcherrima is known from only three localities; two are within or near the Frank Hann National Park,
while the other occurs nearly 70 km to the south, adjacent to the Phillips River.  It grows in sand overlying granite in
Allocasuarina woodland with Grevillea hookeriana, Calytrix and Baeckea, or in mallee heath.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Gibbs,SE 
Esp
Esp
?VCL & NP
14.11.79
Frequent
-
2
Frank Hann 
Esp
Esp
NP
27.10.75
1 000s
-
3
Phillips River 
Alb
Alb
?MRWA Rd Res.
11.10.74
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Probably a disturbance opportunist.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
L. pulcherrima is poorly known and possibly rare; it has not been collected for more than 14 years.  In 1975, it was
observed to be regenerating in mallee heath after a fire in Frank Hann National Park.  Further survey is required.
References
Grieve and Blackall (1982).

280
Melaleuca fissurata Barlow
MYRTACEAE
A large shrub, to 4 m tall.  Leaves are near-opposite with alternate pairs at right angles to each other, elliptical (3-5 x 2
mm), concave, curve backwards from the obtuse tip and are dull green in colour.  Flowers are white or yellow and borne
in dense, semi-globular clusters of 5-15 flowers on one side of old, corky wood.  Staminal bundles are 12-15 mm long;
the ovary is densely covered in short, white hairs.  Fruits (5 x 7 mm) are 3-valved, with 5 short (1 mm), triangular lobes. 
Flowering PeriodSeptember
Distribution and Habitat
Melaleuca fissurata is distributed over 300 km, from near Lake King to Clyde Hill.  It grows in well-drained, aeolian
loamy sand on the margins of salt lakes or along drainage lines in open shrub mallee and tall shrubs.  It may be
associated with 
Eucalyptus transcontinentalis, E. goniantha and Melaleuca spp.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Frank Hann 
Esp
Rav
NP
13.8.79
-
-
2a*
Clyde Rock Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
20+
Good
2b
Clyde Rock Rd
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
100+
Good
3
Mt Ney Rd 
Esp
Esp
?NR
3.8.83
-
-
4
Mt Ridley,SSW 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
25.9.92
3
Good
5
Cox Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
22.9.92
1 000+
Good
6
Truslove,E Esp
Esp
NR
22.9.92
20+
Good
7
Lignite Rd 
Esp
Esp
?VCL
17.11.92
1 000+
Good
8
Truslove Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
22.9.92
20+
Good
9
Lake King,WSW 
Kat
LG
-
10.8.68
-
-
10*
Ridley Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
23.9.93
50+
Good
11*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
100+
Good
12a*
Mt Heywood,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
20+
Good
12b*
Mt Heywood,NW
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
500+
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown

281
Summary and Recommendations
M. fissurata occurs in the Frank Hann National Park and is common in two Nature Reserves where it should remain
secure.  It is widespread in Crown Land north of Mt Beaumont, an area which it is not immediately threatened for
agricultural clearing.  

282
Melaleuca viminea subsp. appressa Barlow
MYRTACEAE
A shrub, 1.3-4.5 m tall.  Leaves are arranged spirally and held close to the stem, linear to narrow-elliptic (5-9 x 0.6-2
mm), rounded at the apex and slightly curved inwards, veins and glands are rarely seen.  Elongate clusters (8-40 mm) of
10-50 flowers occur at both the base and tips of branches; bracts (1.5-4 x 1-2 mm) are persistent to flowering; sepals are
triangular (1 mm) and have membranous margins.  There are 8-11 cream-coloured stamens (5 mm including claw) per
bundle.  Fruits are shortly cylindrical to bell-shaped (3-4 x 2-4 mm) and bluntly toothed at the rim.
Melaleuca viminea subsp. appressa differs from the other subspecies by its leaves which are pressed closely to the stem
and the floral parts which are distinctly shorter.
Flowering PeriodSeptember - October
Distribution and Habitat
M. viminea subsp. appressa is known from near Ongerup, Mt Burdett and north-west of Skeleton Rock, a distribution of
over 100 km.  It grows near creeks or wet depressions in clayey soils, possibly associated with granite.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Burdett 
Esp
Esp
NR
28.9.88
-
-
2
Skeleton Rock,NW 
Mer
Yil
-
8.10.86
-
-
3
Ongerup,E Alb
Jer
-
21.10.75
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Further survey is required.
References
Quinn 
et al. (1992).

283
Melaleuca sp. Ravensthorpe (M.A.Burgman 4018)
MYRTACEAE
Burgman (1985b) lists five specimens which he considers to be this taxon.  Two have since been identified as 
Melaleuca
pauperiflora subsp. pauperiflora (M.A.Burgman 4551 and K.R.Newbey 2764) and one as subsp. fastigiata
(M.A.Burgman 3572b).  These taxa are not considered endangered.
Currently, M.A.Burgman 4018 and 3645 have not been located in the Western Australian Herbarium so their taxonomic
status cannot be determined.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
The two unidentified specimens of 
M. sp. Ravensthorpe occur south-west of Peak Charles. 
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
NP
9.84
-
-
2
Rawlinson Rd 
Esp
Esp
?NR
10.84
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
It is probable that once the Burgman specimens are located, 
M. sp. Ravensthorpe will be identified as one of the
subspecies of 
M. pauperiflora which are not Priority taxa.  According to Burgman (1985b) the taxon is widespread in
the Cascades area.  No further survey is recommended until the original specimens have been examined.
References
Burgman (1985b).

284
Microcorys virgata R.Br.
LAMIACEAE
A slender, erect shrub, to 2 m tall, which adopts a weeping habit with age.  The linear leaves (5-7 mm) are in whorls of
3, flat or concave, and have a rounded apex.  The small pale blue buds and white flowers are in groups of 3 toward the
branch tips; the upper lip of the corolla forms a small hood, while the lower lip is much longer.  The outer surface of the
corolla is mostly hairy; the calyx has a fringe of hairs on the margin and is otherwise shiny.
Microcorys virgata is closely related to M. barbata which has a calyx covered in long white silky hairs, and to
M. glabra which lacks hairs on the calyx and corolla.
Flowering Period:  August - January, May
Distribution and Habitat
M. virgata is distributed between Albany and Cape Arid.  It grows in a variety of habitats, including sandy soil over
granite, limestone or quartzite, and clay loam.  It occurs on lower slopes of mountains and on plains in woodland, shrub
mallee and heath communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1*
Fisheries Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
19.4.93
1
Good
2
Coujinup Hill,NE 
Esp
Rav
VCL
11.12.83
-
-
3
East Mt Barren 
Alb
Rav
NP
19.11.85
Rare
-
4
Willyung Hill 
Alb
Alb
Private 
25.8.92
4
Healthy
5
Chillinup Rd 
Alb
Alb
Shire Rd Verge
1.9.92
20
Healthy
6
Kojonup Springs Rd 
Alb
Alb
Shire Res.
9.2.93
11
Healthy
7
Hamilla Hill 
Alb
Cbk
NP
24.8.93
1
-
8
Wedge Hill 
Alb
Plgt
NP
12.5.82
-
-
9
Woodjenilup 
Alb
?Alb
Shire Rd Res.
22.10.85
-
-
10
Mt Groper 
Alb
Alb
VCL
16.1.85
Scattered
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
M. virgata appears to be widespread but never common.  Verification of specimens in the Western Australian
Herbarium is required, as a number of collections have been confused with 
M. barbata and M. glabra.  Further
opportunistic survey is required.
References
Blackall and Grieve (1981), Burgman (1985b), Robinson and Coates (1995).

285
Monotaxis sp. Ravensthorpe (M.A.Burgman 2154)
EUPHORBIACEAE
[ex. 
Amperea sp. Ravensthorpe (M.A.Burgman 2154)]
A small, inconspicuous annual.  Flowers are in dense, head-like, terminal clusters (cyme).  Male flowers have 4 or more
stamens that are free and have 2-celled anthers opening in longitudinal slits.  Female flowers have their styles divided
into 2.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
Monotaxis spRavensthorpe is known from only two localities about 80 km apart, south of Peak Eleanora and near the
Oldfield River.  It grows in pale brown sand in very open shrub mallee and dense low heath.
Another population, whose identification is in doubt, may occur near Red Peak in the Fitzgerald River National Park.  
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Ravensthorpe,E Esp
Rav
-
6.9.83
-
-
2
Peak Eleanora,SSE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
27.9.84
-
-
?3
Red Peak,WNW 
Alb
Jer
NP
13.10.78
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The general areas of the two populations in the Esperance District were surveyed in September 1992, however this taxon
was not found.  Further survey is required.
References
Blackall and Grieve (1974), Burgman (1985b).

286
Olearia laciniifolia Lander
ASTERACEAE
An erect shrub, 0.8-1.0 m tall, which is covered in long, glandular hairs.  Stems are softly-hairy, pale yellow when
young, becoming purplish with age.  Leaves are alternate, scattered, lack stalks, flat, oblong (6-35 x 1-10 mm), grey-
green on both sides, and have a stout midvein; margins are divided into small, pointed lobes (saw-toothed).  The classic
daisy flower heads (26-35 mm diameter) are borne singly on long stalks (to 25 mm), in the axils of leaves at the ends of
branches.  The whorl of bracts surrounding the base of the flower head (involucre) is hemispherical in shape.  The ray
florets ('petals') number 35-43 and are lilac-coloured; the disc florets number 53-90 and are white below and yellow
above; the pappus has about 20 long bristles.
Olearia laciniifolia is similar to O. rudis which has a number of flower heads in a leaf axils, 39-75 ray florets, 86-241
disc florets and the pappus has 31-42 long bristles and 10-14 much shorter ones.
Flowering Period:  June - November
Distribution and Habitat
O. laciniifolia occurs north-east and north-west of Clyde Hill and between Lake Grace and Lake King.  It grows on
white sand amongst mallee and 
Melaleuca shrubland around playa lakes.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 2
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Clyde Hill,NE 
Esp
Esp
?Private
6.83
-
-
2a*
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
100+
Post-fire
2b*
Clyde Hill,NW
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
1+
Post-fire
3*
Peak Charles 
Esp
Esp
NP
18.9.93
1
Post-fire
4
Lake Grace,E 
Kat
LG
?Rd Res.
22.9.66
-
-
5
Lake King 
Kat
LG
-
11.30
-
-
6
258 mile peg 
Kat
LG
-
24.9.63
-
-
7
Dowels-Lake King Rd 
Kat
LG
-
-
-
-
8
Kukerin,W Kat
Dum
-
11.9.75
-
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Its occurrence after fire at populations 2 and 3 suggests this species is a disturbance opportunist.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Although 
O. laciniifolia is widely distributed, there are few collections.  Within the Katanning District, it has not been
collected for nearly 20 years.  Most of its known distribution is within agricultural areas which would make this taxon
vulnerable. 
In autumn 1993, new populations were located north-west of Clyde Hill and south of Peak Charles, both areas had been
recently burnt (January 1991).
References
Lander (1990).

287
Opercularia hirsuta F.Muell.
RUBIACEAE
Silky-haired Stinkweed
An erect herb, about 30 cm tall, with straight and slender stems.  The stems and foliage are covered with long, soft
almost silky hairs.  The few leaves are linear (12-28 mm) with an obtuse apex.  Flower heads are globular, on erect
stalks, and have numerous small flowers; the calyx-tubes are joined, and the calyx-lobes are scarcely as long as the
silky-hairy corollas.  Seeds are oblong-egg-shaped, obtusely 4-angled and wrinkled except for the 2 lateral smooth
angles.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
Opercularia hirsuta apparently occurs between the Oldfield River and Lucky Bay and extends north to Peak Charles.  It
grows in shallow soil over granite, in low shrub communities.

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