Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Boxer Island 
Esp
Esp
NR
8.11.50
-
-
2
Mt Cooper,NNW 
Alb
Jer
-
9.10.87
1 Patch
-
3
Ajana,W Ger
Nthn
-
23.8.65
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
C. cephaloformis subsp. murrayi is a minute annual that is poorly known, but has possibly been overlooked because of
its small size.  It has been collected only four times in the last 70 years.  Further survey is required.
References
Black (1923, 1960), Cooke (1980).

379
Chorizema ulotropis J.M.Taylor & Crisp
PAPILIONACEAE
A straggling, sparse shrub, to 45 cm tall, and often tangled amongst other shrubs.  Leaves are linear (8-20 x 1 mm), near
opposite or alternate, stalked, finely sharp-pointed and sometimes hooked at the tip; margins are rolled tightly
backwards towards the midrib (revolute) which is prominent on the underside; basal appendages (stipules) are absent.
Up to 10 flowers are borne in head-like clusters (racemes, 10-15 mm) at the ends of branches.  The calyx (6-8 mm) is
densely covered in fine, long white or grey hairs; lobes are acute at the tip, the lower lobes are divided for more than or
equal to half the length of the calyx, the upper 2 lobes are united but have free tips.  The corolla has a large slightly
reflexed petal (8-10 x 8-11 mm) which is dented in the middle on the margin and coloured orange-yellow on the upper
side and dark red-brown underneath; the wings are yellow and red-brown and shaped like an ear lobe (7.5-10 x 1-2 mm);
the narrow keel which often protrudes between the wing-petals is orange-yellow at the base and dark red-brown at the
tip which narrows to a point (2-4 mm) and is often curled.  Stamens are all free.  The ovary is covered in long, silky
white hairs.  Legumes are fleshy (5-7.5 x 3-4 mm).
Chorizema ulotropis has affinity to C. cytisoides, C. obtusifolium, C. circinale and C. uncinatum all of which have
broader leaves (>1.5 mm). 
Flowering PeriodAugust - September
Distribution and Habitat
C. ulotropis mainly grows in the Jerramungup area, although one specimen has been collected near Young River.  It
grows on flat or undulating plains in sand, gravelly sand or sandy clay, in mallee-heath communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations (List incomplete as specimens on loan)
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Young River 
Esp
Esp
-
-
-
2
Ravensthorpe,W Alb
Rav
-
14.8.82
-
-
3a
Jerramungup,E 
Alb
Jer
MRWA Rd Res.
17.9.83
-
-
3b
Jerramungup,E
Alb
Jer
MRWA Rd Res.
12.9.66
-
-
4
Needilup Hill 
Alb
Jer
-
16.8.64
-
-
5
Ongerup,E 
Alb
Jer
MRWA Rd Res.
23.8.63
-
-
6
Ongerup,W Alb
Gno
-
22.8.62
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
No populations are known in any conservation reserve.  Further survey is required. 
References
Taylor and Crisp (1992).

380
Cypselocarpus haloragoides (F.Muell. ex Benth.) F.Muell.
GYROSTEMONACEAE
A sprawling, short-lived herb, 10-15 cm tall and up to 1 m diameter, which divides at ground level into 4-7 prostrate
slender stems.  Leaves are narrow-elliptical (7-20 x 3-5 mm), acute at the tip, lack stalks, semi-succulent and are
scattered along the branches.  Separate male and female inflorescences are borne singly on short stalks (1 mm) in leaf
axils at the ends of branches.  Male flowers are small (3 mm across), pale yellow, with 8-10 anthers which are 2-celled.
Female flowers are similar to male flowers, the near cylindrical ovary (2 mm) is smooth with a recessed apex; the stigma
is 3-lobed and fringed with hairs.  The fruit is an enlarged, barrel-shaped carpel (4-6 mm).
Cypselocarpus haloragoides has a similar habit to Gyrostemon prostratus which has succulent, linear leaves (3-5 mm).
Flowering Period:  September - November
Distribution and Habitat
C. haloragoides is distributed between the Stirling Range and Israelite Bay, a range of 550 km.  It grows in well-drained
sand on coastal dunes and on sandplain.  Associated species include 
Sporobolus sp., Acacia cyclops, Scaevola
crassifolia, Dryandra armata and Melaleuca leptospermoides.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Israelite Bay 
Esp
Esp
NR
22.10.60
-
-
2
Cape Arid 
Esp
Esp
NP
26.4.93
50+
Good
3
Mt Baring,N 
Esp
Esp
NP
12.10.83
15
-
25.4.93
Not found
-
4a
Esperance Esp
Esp
-
12.56
-
-
4b
Esperance
Esp
Esp
-
8.62
-
-
5
Jerdacuttup Lakes 
Alb
Rav
NR
15.10.83
Common
Post-fire
6
Ravensthorpe,WSW Alb
Rav
NP
17.9.79
1
Disturbed
7
Woolbernup Hill,NE 
Alb
Rav
NP
22.11.85
Rare
-
8
Devils Creek Rd 
Alb
Jer
-
1960s
Few
-
9
Bremer Bay 
Alb
Jer
-
-
-
-
10
Bremer Bay,S 
Alb
Jer
-
18.6.74
Common
-
11
Bremer Bay 
Alb
Jer
Golf Club
31.8.76
-
-
12
Bremer Bay,W 
Alb
Jer
-
12.9.87
Scattered
Post-fire
13
Chester Pass Rd 
Alb
Gno
NP
3.9.69
-
Post-fire
14
Salt River Rd 
Kat
Cbk
-
17.11.82
Common
Post-fire
15
Camel Lake 
Kat
Cbk
NR
28.20.83
-
Post-fire
Response to Disturbance
Appears to be a disturbance opportunist.  It has usually been found on sandplain after fire or on near-shore sand dunes.

381
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
C. haloragoides occurs in the Stirling Range, Fitzgerald River and Cape Arid National Parks and in two Nature
Reserves.
Perry (1992) indicates that the specimens housed in the Western Australian Herbarium under this name are very
variable, suggesting that more than one taxon may be involved.  Further taxonomic work is recommended.  
References
George (1982), Newbey (1983), Perry (1992).

382
Dicrastylis obovata Munir
CHLOANTHACEAE
An erect, openly branching shrub, 60-90 cm tall.  The greyish green leaves are broadest above the middle (obovate, 0.7-
1.5 x 3-7 mm), obtuse at the tip, almost hairless, leathery when dry and overlap towards the ends of branches.  Dense
clusters of flowers (panicle, 35-60 x 20-25 mm in outline) are borne on long stalks (5-6 mm) which are further arranged
in groups (cyme) with individual flower stalks (2-4 mm) covered in grey felt-like hairs.  Flowers are mostly 5-merous,
with a bracteole on either side of the bract.  The calyx (1-2 mm) is covered in short, greyish felt-like hairs, and the pale
grey or white corolla (4-5 mm) is sparsely hairy.  Five stamens (sometimes 4) are much exserted beyond the corolla.
The ovary (1 mm) is densely white hairy.
Flowering Period:  July, October - November
Distribution and Habitat
Dicrastylis obovata is known to occur in the Frank Hann National Park and further north, near Lake Hope, a range of
about 50 km.  It grows in deep yellow sand in shrub communities associated with 
Melaleuca uncinata and Grevillea
excelsior.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Frank Hann 
Esp
Rav
NP
13.11.79
Frequent
-
17.9.93
1 only
Vulnerable
2(?=1)
Ninety Mile Tank,W 
Esp
Dund
VCL
17.10.74
-
-
3
Forrestania-Lake Hope
Esp
Dund
VCL
25.11.64
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Appears to be a disturbance opportunist.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
D. obovata is very poorly known and possibly rare.  All of the D. obovata collections which have been recorded from
Frank Hann National Park appear to be from the one locality; the population (no. 2) recorded by both H. Demarz and E.
Witter (17.10.74) as "W of Ninety Mile Tank", would also be at the same locality if they travelled the Lake King-
Norseman Rd.  In 1993, a survey relocated the population (no. 1) in Frank Hann National Park, and only one plant was
found alongside the road where the verge had been disturbed.  Further survey is required.
References
Munir (1978).

383
Dodonaea trifida F.Muell.
SAPINDACEAE
An erect shrub, to 1 m tall, with separate male and female flowers.  The spreading branches are densely hairy.  Leaves
are triangular (7-12 x 4-10 mm) and 3-lobed above the middle, rarely dividing again, lack stalks, smooth or sparsely
hairy on margin and midrib, leathery, and margins are slightly rolled backwards (revolute).  Clusters of 3-5 flowers are
borne on short stalks (1-2 mm) at the ends of branches.  Male flowers have 8 stamens with large anthers (2-3 x 0.8 mm)
that have an hairy appendage at the apex.  Female flowers have a densely hairy, oblong ovary (1.5 mm) comprising 3
carpels.  Fruits are 3-angled capsules which are dark red or brown tinged with purple at maturity, and bear 1-4 seeds that
are black and shiny.
Flowering Period:  August - November
Fruiting Period:  November - January
Distribution and Habitat
Dodonaea trifida is widely distributed between Albany and the Oldfield River, a range of about 300 km.  It grows in
grey loamy sand, rocky loam, clay or gravelly soils, and is most often found on hillsides, as an undershrub in coastal
scrub or low woodland.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Ravensthorpe,E Esp
Rav
-
5.8.72
-
-
2
Kundip Alb
Rav
VCL
20.11.66
-
-
3
Thumb Peak 
Alb
Rav
NP
27.10.67
-
-
4
Fitzgerald River 
Alb
?Rav
NP
1970
-
-
5
Bremer Bay,NNW 
Alb
Jer
NP
18.9.86
Scattered
-
6
Millars Point 
Alb
Jer
Shire Res.
17.11.92
300+
Healthy
7
Cape Riche 
Alb
Alb
Shire Res.
3.11.92
50+
Healthy
8
Mt Melville 
Alb
Alb
Shire Res.
22.11.64
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
D. trifida should remain secure in the Fitzgerald River National Park.  Further survey is required.
References
Robinson and Coates (1995), West (1984b).

384
Dryandra viscida A.S.George
PROTEACEAE
[= 
Dryandra sp. 16 (A.S.George 9446)]
A dense, rounded shrub, to 1 m tall, without a lignotuber.  Branches are hairy and densely leaved.  Leaves are linear
(150-350 x 5-10 mm) and cut into close, acute, short (3-6 mm), triangular lobes on both sides almost to the midrib.
Flower heads are golden yellow and closely successive at the ends of branches.  The perianth limb (55 mm) and bracts
are hairy and sticky.  Seed capsules are oblong (15 mm), sparsely hairy and sticky.
This taxon has affinity to 
Dryandra horrida.
Flowering Period:  July
Distribution and Habitat
D. viscida is known from Hatter Hill, Digger Rocks, and the Ironcaps, where it grows in stony red-yellow loam in low
scrub, associated with 
Grevillea, Acacia and Allocasuarina.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Hatter Hill 
Esp
Rav
VCL
27.10.92
1000+
Good
2
South Ironcap 
Nar
Kon
-
8.7.79
Frequent
-
3
Middle Ironcap 
Nar
Kon
-
2.10.86
-
-
4
Digger Rocks,W 
Nar
Kon
-
-
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible but occurs outside the area where 
Phytophthora is considered to be a threat.
Summary and Recommendations
Monitoring of the population at Hatter Hill is essential.  Although mining activity has currently ceased, the population is
vulnerable to future disturbance.  Liaison with the mining tenement holder is needed.
Further survey is required.  
D. viscida is not known in any conservation reserve.

385
Eremophila purpurascens Chinnock
MYOPORACEAE
A shrub, to 1.5 m tall, with branches that are densely covered with wart-like, slightly raised glands.  Leaves are alternate,
mostly clustered at the branch tips, very thick, almost fleshy, broader towards the tip and gradually tapering to the base
(obovate-spathulate, 5-13 x 2-7 mm), apex obtuse, but the tip is pointed and curved backwards; the lower surface has
warty protuberances.  Single flowers are borne in the leaf axils on long, purplish, S-shaped stalks (10-25 mm) that are
covered in short, glandular and non-glandular hairs.  The 5 calyx lobes are divided to the base, broad obovate (8-11 x 6-
8 mm), overlap one another, mostly purple and covered in glandular hairs on both sides.  The corolla is yellow with
purple spots in bud, and the open flower is light purple with dark purple spots and inside the short tube (10-12 mm) is
yellow in the lower portion.  The 4 stamens extend slightly beyond the tube; the ovary is smooth.  Fruits are conical (4 x
3 mm), drying black and have a wrinkled exterior.  Seeds are small (2 x 0.5 mm), oblong and white.
Eremophila purpurascens is closely related to E. alternifolia which has less warty branches and linear leaves (20-35 x
1-4 mm).
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
E. purpurascens is restricted to the granite hills around Norseman, with a known range of less than 15 km.  It grows in
rocky, red-brown loam in low shrub and woodland communities.  Associated species include 
Melaleuca uncinata and
Triodia spp.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Jimberlana Hill 
Esp
Dund
Unvested Res.
19.11.92
200+
Good
1b
Norseman,ENE
Esp
Dund
?VCL
18.11.93
2+
Good
2
Norseman,NE Esp
Dund
-
29.8.74
-
-
3
Norseman,NW Esp
Dund
VCL
24.10.67
-
-
4
Lake Cowan 
Esp
Dund
VCL
11.9.76
-
-
5
Norseman Hills 
Esp
Dund
-
27.9.31
-
-
6
Norseman,S Esp
Dund
-
21.10.64
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. purpurascens appears to very geographically restricted.  The majority of localities where this species grows are
covered by mining leases.  Further intensive survey of hills and ridges in the vicinity of Norseman is required. 
References
Chinnock (1979).

386
Eucalyptus brockwayi C.A.Gardner
MYRTACEAE
Dundas Mahogany
An erect tree, up to 25 m tall.  Bark is smooth to patchy, white or grey peeling in patches to expose fresh bark that is
salmon pink to bronze.  The juvenile leaves are pale green, hairy, crowded, and lack stalks, linear (30 x 5 mm)
becoming elliptical (20-70 x 5-30 mm).  Adult leaves are stalked, green and glossy, narrow-lanceolate (70-130 x 7-15
mm) with a very dense network of veins and apparently lack oil glands.  Each inflorescence has 11-15 buds borne on an
rounded or slightly angular stalk (peduncle, 5-14 mm).  Individual buds (7-8 x 3-4 mm) are on very short stalks, smooth,
have a bluntly conical bud cap that is shorter than the calyx tube, and a scar where the cap joins the tube.  Flowers are
white.  Fruits are almost globular/urn-shaped (urceolate, 5-7 x 5-7 mm) with a thin rim, a descending disc, and 3 or 4
enclosed valves.  Seed is smooth, grey, compressed ovoid, with longitudinal grooves.
Flowering Period:  April - June
Distribution and Habitat
Eucalyptus brockwayi occurs around Norseman, over a 50 km range.  It grows in red sandy, often gravelly loam, on flat
or gently sloping ground, in open woodland.  Associated species include 
E. flocktoniae, E. dundasii, E. lesouefii, E.
griffithsii, E. salmonophloia and Acacia merrallii.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Norseman,W Esp
Dund
-
15.12.40
-
-
1b
Norseman,W
Esp
Dund
-
7.2.66
-
-
1c
Norseman,W
Esp
Dund
-
6.46
-
-
2
Norseman Esp
Dund
-
1.36
-
-
3
Norseman,NNW Esp
Dund
-
27.4.88
-
-
4a
Norseman,N 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
21.6.78
Abundant
-
4b
Mt Thirsty
Esp
Dund
?VCL
27.1.67
-
-
5
Norseman,N 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
2.11.92
15
Good
6
Norseman,N 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
1.2.79
Dominant
-
7
Norseman,NW 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
20.11.92
20+
Good
8
Norseman,NW Esp
Dund
VCL
20.11.92
Frequent
Good
9a
Norseman,SE Esp
Dund
-
11.11.70
-
-
9b
Norseman,SE
Esp
Dund
?VCL (Mining Lease) 18.9.78
-
-
9c*
Norseman,SSE
Esp
Dund
?VCL
19.11.92
4
Good
10
Norseman,S 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
29.3.68
-
-
11
Norseman,S 
Esp
Dund
?MRWA Rd Res.
19.9.78
-
-
12
Woolyeenyer Hill 
Esp
Dund
-
14.3.80
Very common
-
13
Jimberlana Hill 
Esp
Dund
-
18.11.87
-
-
14*
Brockway Esp
Dund
Timber 
Res.
18.11.92
14+
Good
* = new population 

387
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. brockwayi is widespread around Norseman, although most of the known populations are small.  Up to 26 km north-
west of Norseman, along the Norseman-Coolgardie Highway, and westwards along a track towards Theatre Rock, 
E.
brockwayi is frequent, but never abundant, with only 3 to 6 widely scattered trees at any particular locality.  It is not
known to occur in any conservation reserve.
A timber reserve has been proposed for an area between Theatre Rocks and Lake Cowan, which would include
E. brockwayi and E. pterocarpa populations (Henry-Hall 1990).  Further action on this proposal is required.
References
Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Gardner (1942), Henry-Hall (1990).

388
Eucalyptus creta L.A.S.Johnson & K.D.Hill
MYRTACEAE
Large-fruited Gimlet
A tree, to 10 m tall, with coarsely fluted stems and shining, smooth, bronze to coppery bark.  Adult leaves are lanceolate
or narrow-lanceolate (60-100 x 10-18 mm) with a sparse network of veins and large oil glands, thick, bright green and
distinctly glossy.  Up to 3 flowers are borne per inflorescence; stalks are very short (1-3 mm) or absent.  Buds are
globular to ovoid (about 15 mm wide) with conical to hooked bud caps.  Flowers are creamy yellow.  Fruits are broadly
hemispherical, (9-12 x 15-21 mm), 2-winged, 4-5 valved and have a broad, raised scar (1.5-2.5 mm wide) from the bud
cap.
Eucalyptus creta is related to E. diptera which has smaller buds (10-14 x 7-11 mm) and fruits (7-11 x 10-15 mm).
Flowering Period:  May - June

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