Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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Distribution and Habitat
E. creta has a scattered distribution north-east of Mt Ridley, with a known range of about 50 km.  It grows on brown
clay loam, in woodland or very open tree mallee and heath, associated with 
Melaleuca and Acacia.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Sheoak Hill,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
350+
Good
2
Sheoak Hill,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
12.84
-
-
3
Sheoak Hill,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
9.84
-
-
4
Clyde Rock,NNW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
12.84
-
-
5
Mt Beaumont,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
12.84
-
-
6
Wittenoom Hills,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
16.9.70
-
-
7
Salmon Gums,N 
Esp
Esp
-
15.12.40
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. creta is distributed in a remote area which is not threatened by clearing for agriculture.  Resurvey of known
populations and further opportunistic survey are required.
References
Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Johnson and Hill (1991).

389
Eucalyptus exigua Brooker & Hopper
MYRTACEAE
An erect mallee, about 3.5 m tall, with smooth bark.  The grey-green juvenile leaves are ovate (to 70 x 40 mm), while
adult leaves are narrow-lanceolate to lanceolate (60-110 x 8-19 mm) and glossy light green.  Up to 11 stalked buds are
borne on a rounded stalk (peduncle, 7-19 mm).  Bud caps are very short (2 mm) and very constricted at the join with the
calyx tube (5 mm + 3 mm stalk).  Flowers are white.  Fruits are cup-shaped with 3 or 4 valves to rim level or enclosed;
the disc is descending and the rim thin.
Eucalyptus exigua is closely related to E. brachycorys which occurs near wet depressions in the northern and central
Wheatbelt.  
E. brachycorys grows up to 6 m tall, has a rough basal stocking and has smaller buds and fruits than
E. exigua.
Flowering Period:  ?February
Distribution and Habitat
E. exigua occurs in the Lake Cronin area, with a known distribution of about 75 km.  It grows on sandplain or in low
lying areas, in sandy loam, loam or clay loam in open woodland or mallee-heath communities.  Associated species may
include 
E. dundasii, E. calycogona, E. eremophila, E. foecunda and E. sheathiana.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Mt Day,W 
Esp
Dund
VCL
7.11.83
-
-
1b
Hyden-Norseman Rd
Esp
Dund
VCL
7.11.83
Frequent
-
1c
Cross Roads,E
Esp
Dund
VCL
6.4.85
-
-
2
McDermid Rock,SW 
Esp
Dund
VCL
15.7.79
Scattered
-
3a
Lake Cronin area 
Mer
Kon
VCL
6.2.81
Common
-
3b
Lake Cronin,NE
Mer
Kon
VCL
21.10.86
Frequent
-
3c
Lake Cronin,E
Mer
Kon
VCL
3.10.75
-
-
4
Lake Cronin,E 
Mer
Kon
VCL
3.9.86
-
-
5
Cross Roads,S 
Mer
Kon
VCL
22.7.88
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. exigua is only known from Lake Cronin where it forms the dominant species in the plant community.  Resurvey of
known populations and further survey are required.
References
Brooker and Kleinig (1990).

390
Eucalyptus famelica Brooker & Hopper 
MYRTACEAE
A medium-sized mallee.  Bark is smooth, grey or pinkish-brown, sometimes with thin, rough, persistent bark at the base.
Young branches are square in cross-section.  Juvenile leaves are ovate to broad-lanceolate (80-120 x 30-40 mm) and
dull, blue-green.  Adult leaves are glossy green, lanceolate (70-90 x 15-20 mm), with a dense network of veins and
sparse oil glands.  Inflorescences are 7-flowered and borne on a stout, flattened stalk (peduncle, 5-12 mm).  Buds (10-15
x 5-6 mm) are more or less stalkless, ribbed and have a rounded or conical to beaked bud cap.  Flowers are white.  Fruits
are cup-shaped to cylindrical (7-9 x 7-8 mm), ribbed, thick-rimmed, and have a descending disc and 3 or 4 enclosed
valves.  Seed is brown and shallowly pyramidal in shape.
Eucalyptus famelica is similar to a number of species including:  E. rigens which grows in saline habitats, has larger
buds and fruits, and 3-flowered inflorescences; 
E. incrassata which has slightly larger fruits (8-13 x 7-13 mm) that are
distinctly stalked, and black seeds; and, 
E. litorea which is known only east of Condingup.
Flowering Period:  April - August
Distribution and Habitat
E. famelica is known only from near the coast between the Vermin Proof Fence and the Oldfield River, with a disjunct
population occurring about 30 km away, to the north of Munglinup.  It grows in large clumps, emergent above low
shrubs in winter-wet depressions in undulating sandplain.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last No. 
of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
VPF-Oldfield River
Esp
Esp
NR, Shire Rd
2.2.89
3 000+ 
Good
Res. & Private
2
Stokes Inlet,NE
Esp
Esp
-
7.5.81
Common
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. famelica appears to be geographically restricted, with about 25% of the known localities occurring on the Lake
Shaster Nature Reserve where it should remain secure.  The remaining populations are on road reserves and private
property (N. McQuoid, personal communication).  Populations on farmlands are possibly vulnerable to clearing, rising
water tables and excessive salinity.
References
Brooker and Hopper (1989), Brooker and Kleinig (1990).

391
Eucalyptus histophylla Brooker & Hopper
MYRTACEAE
A mallee, to 4 m tall. with smooth bark.  The bluish-green juvenile leaves are ovate to lanceolate (to 11 x 4 cm), while
adult leaves are narrowly lanceolate to lanceolate (to 11 x 1 cm), held erect and slightly glossy green.  Up to 13 spindle-
shaped, stalked buds (to 20 x 3 mm) are borne per flattened stalk (peduncle, 10-18 mm).  The bud cap is horn-shaped
and may be hooked at the tip.  Fruits are stalked and cylindrical (to 9 x 5 mm).  Seeds are light grey-brown, smooth and
subspherical.
Eucalyptus histophylla is within the series Reduncae and is closely related to E. tumida which has a more southern
distribution in coastal and subcoastal areas, near Esperance.  Possible hybrids of 
E. histophylla x tumida are found near
Clyde Hill, Salmon Gums and west of Grass Patch.
Flowering Period:  Unknown
Distribution and Habitat
E. histophylla is known south of Norseman, and between Fraser Range and Balladonia extending southwards to Mt
Buraminya, a range of over 150 km.  It predominantly grows on granite outcrops and may be associated with
E eremophila, E. fraseri, E. leptophylla and E. indurata.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Balladonia,W 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
17.11.93
1
Good
1b
Balladonia,W
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
17.11.93
60+
Good
1c
Balladonia,W
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
17.11.93
20+
Good
3a
Boingaring Rocks 
Esp
Dund
NR
12.12.90
Common
-
3b
Boingaring Rocks,E
Esp
Dund
NR
21.8.89
-
-
4
Mt Coobaninya 
Esp
Dund
VCL
22.8.89
-
-
5
Mt Buraminya
Esp 
Dund
VCL
23.8.89
-
-
6a
Norseman,S 
Esp
Dund
?MRWA Rd Res.
5.11.86
Frequent
-
6b
Norseman,S
Esp
Dund
?MRWA Rd Res.
3.1.78
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. histophylla appears to widespread east and south-east of the Fraser Range.  It occurs in the Dundas Nature Reserve
and Crown Land that is not threatened by clearing.  Further opportunistic survey of granite outcrops within the known
distribution is recommended.
References
Brooker and Hopper (1991), Brooker and Kleinig (1990).

392
Eucalyptus ovularis Maiden & Blakely
MYRTACEAE
Small-fruited Mallee
A mallee or small tree, to 9 m tall, with grey-brown rough bark on the lower half and smooth pinkish-grey bark above.
The rough stocking may be absent on plants growing north-east of Esperance.  Leaves are stalked, alternating, narrow-
lanceolate (55-90 x 5-8 mm), at first dull, grey-green becoming glossy green with a dense network of veins and
numerous oil glands.  More than 7 buds are borne per inflorescence on a slender, angular stalk (peduncle, 8-13 mm).
Individual buds are shortly stalked, ovoid (5-6 x 3 mm), with a scar where the bud cap joins the calyx tube.  Flowers are
white.  Fruits are borne on short stalks, ovoid to slightly urn-shaped (4-6 x 4 mm), thin rimmed with 3 enclosed valves
and a descending disc.  Seed is brown, compressed-ovoid with a distinct, shallow, net-like pattern on the surface.
A species similar to 
Eucalyptus ovularis, which grows in the Esperance District, is E. myriadena (Bullfinch-Southern
Cross-Ravensthorpe) which has smaller, pear-shaped buds (4-5 x 2-3 mm) and very glossy, dark green leaves.
Flowering Period:  September - April
Distribution and Habitat
E. ovularis is scattered from east of Ravensthorpe to near Balladonia, a range of about 260 km.  It grows on sandy loams
or clays, in open shrub mallee over low scrub.  Associated species include 
E. flocktoniae, E. eremophila and E  pileata.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Londonderry,S Gold
Cool
-
29.9.79
Frequent
-
2
Norseman,N 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
27.3.68
-
-
3
Jyndabinbin Rocks,NE 
Esp
Dund
NR
11.12.90
Dominant
-
4
Mt Willgonarinya 
Esp
Dund
VCL
13.12.91
Dominant
-
5
Balladonia,W Esp
Dund
-
21.8.79
-
-
6
Balladonia,SW Esp
Dund
-
11.5.78
Scattered
-
7
Junana Rock 
Esp
Esp
NP
6.11.86
Dominant
-
8
Clyde Rock,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
6.11.86
-
-
9
Clyde Rock,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
8.83
-
-
10
Mt Ney,NNE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
8.8.83
-
-
11
Mt Ney,NNE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
6.5.83
-
-
12
Mt Beaumont,NNE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
10.83
-
-
13
Kumarl,S 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
5.11.86
Frequent
-
14
Salmon Gums 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
14.11.87
-
-
15
Salmon Gums 
Esp
Esp
NR
10.84
-
-
16
Grass Patch 
Esp
Esp
-
31.3.68
-
-
17*
Starcevich Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
24.9.92
20+
Good
18
Peak Charles
Esp
Esp
NP
16.11.87
-
-
8.1.91
-
Burnt
19
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
NP
18.9.93
1+
Good
20
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
10+
Good

393
Known Populations (cont’d)
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
21
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
?Shire Rd Res.
6.6.83
-
-
22
Cups Rd 
Esp
Esp
-
24.6.83
-
-
23
Ravensthorpe,S Alb
Rav
-
30.5.70
-
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. ovularis is widely scattered in the Esperance District.  It is known to occur in the Dundas and Salmon Gums Nature
Reserves and in the Peak Charles and Cape Arid National Parks, where it should remain secure.
References
Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Burgman (1985b), Maiden and Blakely (1925).

394
Eucalyptus semiglobosa Brooker
MYRTACEAE
A mallee or rarely a small tree to 3 m tall.  The bark is smooth, mottled grey, whitish or pale coppery.  The adult leaves
are broad-lanceolate (80-110 x 10-30 mm), grey-green, glossy and have many side veins.  Each inflorescence has up to 7
buds borne on a cylindrical, usually pendulous stalk (peduncle, 9-21 mm).  Buds are stalked (2-8 mm), slightly ribbed
but non-angular (to 13 x 8 mm), and have bud caps that are rounded or hemispherical; a scar is present at the join of the
bud cap with the calyx tube.  Flowers are white.  Fruits are semi-globular (to 10 x 13 mm), thick rimmed and have 4
valves that are enclosed but appear exserted due to the persistent style fragments.
Eucalyptus semiglobosa is closely related to subsp. goniantha which occurs north-east of Albany, has ribbed or angular
buds and fruits, and bud caps with an acute, beaked tip.  
Esemiglobosa is also similar to E. kessellii which has cream
buds with pointed bud caps, wide flattened inflorescence stalks (peduncles) and larger ribbed fruits (10-18 x 13-18 mm).
Flowering Period:  April - June
Distribution and Habitat
E. semiglobosa has a scattered distribution from Cape Le Grand to near Mt Baring, a range of about 120 km.  It grows
on shallow sandy soil near granite domes, or in grey sand on plains and near wet depressions or watercourses.  It grows
in dense mallee thicket or in heath communities, associated with 
E. cooperiana, E. occidentalis, E. uncinata, E. aquilina
or 
E. ligulata
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Coronet Creek 
Esp
Esp
NP
22.4.72
-
-
2
Coolinup Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
14.11.87
Frequent
-
3
Esperance,E Esp
Esp
-
25.3.68
-
-
15.10.74
-
-
4
Fisheries Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
26.9.92
1
Damaged
5
Boyatup Hill 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.4.93
600+
Good
6
Logans Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
28.3.83
-
-
7
Pt Malcolm,W 
Esp
Esp
NR
20.9.76
-
-
8
Mt Arid 
Esp
Esp
NP
23.11.85
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. semiglobosa is widely scattered in subcoastal areas east of Esperance.  It occurs in the Coolinup Nature Reserve, and
Cape Le Grand and Cape Arid National Parks where it should remain secure. 
References
Brooker (1976), Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Hill and Johnson (1992).
Gahnia sp. Grass Patch (M.A.Burgman 4431)
CYPERACEAE

395
A tussock-forming perennial, 40-60 cm tall.  Leaves are almost cylindrical and often curled at the tip; a tuft of long,
white hairs (3-5 mm) occurs at the top of the 'sheath' (6-7 cm from the plant base).  Flowers are arranged in erect, spike-
like panicles; the brown spikelets have the stalk and awn covered in rows of minute clear barbs; the 4 or more outer
glumes are empty and the flowering glumes closely envelope the flowers and nut.
Flowering Period:  October
Distribution and Habitat
Gahnia sp. Grass Patch is common around and near salt lakes between Scaddan and Salmon Gums extending eastwards
to near Parmango Road, a range of over 100 km.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Truslove Esp
Esp
NR 
}
2
Cox  Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR  }
3
Ridley Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR }
20.9.88
10 000+
Good
4
Salmon Gums 
Esp
Esp
NR }
5
Howick Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
10.84
-
-
6
Styles Rd 
Esp
Esp
?Shire Rd Res.
20.9.88
-
-
7
Lignite Rd 
Esp
Esp
?Shire Rd Res.
20.9.88
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Surveys by A. Wilson (personal communication) located "tens of thousands" of 
G.  sp. Grass Patch between Salmon
Gums and Scaddan.  It is known in four Nature Reserves, where it should remain secure.  Only two specimens are
currently lodged in the Western Australian Herbarium; further collections are required.
References
Bentham (1878), Burgman (1985b).

396
Grevillea aneura McGill.
PROTEACEAE
A dense shrub, to about 2 m tall.  Leaves are narrow, rigid and divided, with lobes to 40 mm having sharp, pointed tips.
Flowers are red.
Flowering Period:  September - November
Distribution and Habitat
Grevillea aneura is mainly distributed between Lake King and Sheoak Hill, a range of 220 km.  It grows in sand, sandy
clay, or loam in mallee-heath communities.  
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Lake King,E 
Kat
LG
Shire Rd Res.
26.10.92
20+
Good
2
Mt Gibbs,SE
Esp
Rav
NP
11.8.79
1
-
3
Frank Hann 
Esp
Rav
NP
16.9.93
50+ 
Good
4a
West Point Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
11.9.92
250+
Good
4b*
West Point Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
11.9.92
10+
Good
4c*
Cascades Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
11.9.92
500+
Good
5
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
13.9.92
5 000+
Good
6
Salmon Gums,SW 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
22.1.81
-
-
7
Salmon Gums,SE 
Esp
Esp
?
11.3.80
Frequent
-
8a
Sheoak Hill,W 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
1 000+
Good
8b*
Dingo Rock,S
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
500+
Good
8c*
Dingo Rock,S
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
1 500+
Good
8d*
Dingo Rock,S
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
1 000+
Good
9
Clyde Hill,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
7.8.83
-
-
10a*
Fence Rd 
Kat
LG
?VCL
26.10.93
200+
Good
10b*
Vermin Proof Fence 
Esp
Rav
NP
28.10.92
-
Good
11*
Frank Hann 
Esp
Rav
NP
16.9.93
100+
Good
12*
Edwards Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
12.9.92
50
Vulnerable
13*
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
100+
Average
14a* 
Fields Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
14.9.92
50+
Average
14b*
Fields Rd
Esp
Esp
NR
14.9.92
50+
Good
15*
Grass Patch,S
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
17.11.92
1
Fair
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations

397
Recent surveys have found 
G. aneura to be widespread and relatively common.  It is known to occur in the Frank Hann
National Park and in two Nature Reserves.  Large populations occur between Dingo Rock and Mt Ridley, an area which
is not currently threatened by clearing for agriculture.
References
Olde (1986).

398
Hakea bicornata R.M.Barker
PROTEACEAE
A multistemmed, much-branched shrub, 1-1.3 m tall, with a lignotuber.  Young branches are densely covered in short
hairs which disappear with age.  Leaves are cylindrical (terete, 70-130 x 1.2-1.5 mm), not grooved, smooth when
mature, and have a long spine (1.5-2.5 mm) at the tip which is straight, not recurved.  Inflorescences are usually 8-
flowered (umbel) developing directly from the leaf axil on a very short stalk which is covered in rust- brown hairs.  The
sweet-smelling flowers have hairless stalks (4 mm); the torus is oblique with a gland on the lower side; the creamy-white
perianth (2.5 mm) lacks hairs and is recurved behind the limb, splitting into 4 free segments; the pollen presenter is
conical.  The solitary fruits are broadly elliptic (15-22 x 12-15 mm), pale grey with black pustules and have 2
conspicuous horns (5-6 mm).
The leaves of 
Hakea bicornata are very similar to H. adnata, H. drupacea and H. obliqua.  They can be distinguished
by the recurved leaf tip of 
H. adnata, and the longitudinal groove in the leaf of H. drupacea.  The flowers of H. obliqua
are densely covered in short, silky silvery hairs.
Flowering Period:  March - May, August
Distribution and Habitat
H. bicornata is distributed from east of Scaddan to near Mt Baring, a range of over 100 km.  It grows in lateritic clay or
clay loam over granite, in shrubland. 
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Mt Baring,NNW 
Esp
Esp
?VCL
6.12.60
-
-
1b
Mt Baring,NW
Esp
Esp
VCL
25.4.93
4
Good
2*
Clyde Hill 
Esp
Esp
NR
19.5.93
500+
Good
3
Clyde Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
1 000+
Good
4
Mt Ney 
Esp
Esp
NR
1993
20-30
-
5
Dempster Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
1993
2
-
6
Freebairns Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
1993
16
-
7
Campbells Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
1993
23+
-
8
Wittenoom Hills Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
1993
11
-
9
Howick Hill,NE 
Esp
Esp
?VCL
1993
60+
-
10
Esperance Loc. 1533
Esp
Esp
Private
1993
130+
-
11
Neridup Loc. 232
Esp
Esp
Private
1993
20+
-
12
Scaddan Rd 
Esp
Esp
Private &
1993
200-300
-
Shire Rd Res.
13
Burdett Esp
Esp
NR
1993
23+
-
14
Fisheries Rd,N 
Esp
Esp
-
1993
40+
-
15
Coolinup Rd,NW 
Esp
Esp
Private
1993
30-40
-
16
Coolinup Rd 
Esp
Esp
-
1993
200+
-
17
Coolinup Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
1993
300+
-
* = new population 
Response to Disturbance
Unknown

399
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
H. bicornata is widespread through the agricultural area east of Scaddan (B. Norris, personal communication), and is
known in three Nature Reserves where it should remain secure.  
References
Barker (1990).

400
Hopkinsia adscendens L.A.S.Johnson & B.G.Briggs ms
RESTIONACEAE
A small rhizomatous sedge, with few culms, 15-50 cm tall and about 1 mm diameter.  Rhizomes (5 mm diam.) are
connected by subterranean culms and grow up to 26 cm long.  Culm internodes are 15-60 mm long.  Sheaths are erect
(7-15 mm), slightly loose and obtuse at the apex.  A single inflorescence branch (4-12 cm) is borne per sheath axil.
Flowers are few; bracts are about equal in length (1.5-3 mm).  Male and female flowers are on separate plants; outer
tepals are shorter (<2 mm) than the inner tepals (>2 mm).  Nuts (3 mm) are borne on short stalks and have a persistent
style base.
Flowering Period:  October
Distribution and Habitat
Hopkinsia adscendens ms is relatively widespread around Esperance and has been collected north-east of Albany. It
grows in small depressions and near watercourses in moist peaty sand with 
Banksia and Nuytsia.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Lort River 
Esp
Esp
?VCL
11.10.68
-
-
1b
Lort River
Esp
Esp
-
11.9.66
-
-
2
Young River,W 
Esp
Esp
-
16.10.68
-
-
3
Cape Le Grand Rd
Esp
Esp
-
9.9.66
-
-
4
Chillinup,E Alb
Alb
-
23.10.75
Frequent
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
H. adscendens ms has been poorly collected, with only male plants represented in the Western Australian Herbarium.
According to B. Briggs (personal communication) this species is "difficult to find even within its range of occurrence".
Further survey is required.

401
Lasiopetalum parvuliflorum F.Muell.
STERCULIACEAE
An upright to spreading shrub, to 1 m tall, with young branches covered in grey or rust-coloured, short matted hairs.
Leaves are dull green, linear-oblong (20 mm), obtuse at the tip, smooth above and covered in white or rust-coloured
hairs beneath.  Flowers are borne on short stalks in few-flowered clusters (cyme) that are much shorter than the leaves.
The sepals (3-4 mm) are covered in fine grey to greenish almost scaly hairs on the outside, while inside is brown and
hairless.  Bracteoles are small or absent.  Petals are much reduced; the style is smooth and the ovary hairy.
Flowering Period:  July - September
Distribution and Habitat
Lasiopetalum parvuliflorum is widely distributed between Bremer Bay and Point Malcolm, a range of 400 km.  This
species is also known in New South Wales and Victoria.  It grows in shallow sandy soil on granite or rocky outcrops, in
Eucalyptus woodland or mallee heath.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations In Western Australia
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Point Malcolm 
Esp
Esp
NR
20.9.76
-
-
2
Cape Le Grand 
Esp
Esp
NP
30.7.90
Frequent
-
3
Oldfield  River 
Esp
Esp
-
-
-
-
4*
Howick Hill,E 
Esp
Esp
?VCL
10.10.92
2
Good
5
Point Charles 
Alb
Rav
NP
16.7.80
Scattered
-
6
Bremer Bay,NNW
Alb
Jer
-
26.9.77
Frequent
-
7
Bremer Bay,NNW 
Alb
Jer
-
18.9.86
Rare
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The genus 
Lasiopetalum is currently under revision (C. Wilkins, personal communication).  At present, the specimens in
the Western Australian Herbarium are poorly classified.  Reassessment of the status of 
L. parvuliflorum should be made
after the 
Lasiopetalum collection has been correctly determined.
References
Bentham (1863), Robinson and Coates (1995).

402
Leucopogon apiculatus R.Br.
EPACRIDACEAE
An erect shrub, to 1.5 m tall, which is hairless or softly-hairy.  Leaves are oblong-lanceolate or almost elliptical (12-20
mm), with a flattened point at the tip.  Loose clusters of white flowers (spike) are borne in the upper leaf axils. Bracts
are narrow-lanceolate and acute; bracteoles are half as long as the calyx.  Sepals (3 mm) are often coloured.  The corolla
tube is nearly as long as the calyx, with lobes as long as the tube.  The depressed ovary is 4- or 5- celled.  Fruit is dark
red-brown and much depressed, not exceeding the calyx.
Flowering Period:  July - October
Distribution and Habitat
Leucopogon apiculatus is known between Cape Le Grand and Mt Ragged, a range of 140 km, and on two islands in the
Archipelago of the Recherche.  It grows in shallow sand over granite or quartzite, in scrub heath communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Hellfire Bay 
Esp
Esp
NP
7.10.92
1+
Good
1b
Lucky Bay
Esp
Esp
NP
6.10.92
10+
Good
1c
Thistle Cove
Esp
Esp
NP
9.10.92
20+
Good
1d
Mt Le Grand
Esp
Esp
NP
6.10.92
10
Good
1e
Cape Le Grand
Esp
Esp
NP
8.10.92
1
Good
2
Orleans Bay
Esp
Esp
Shire Res.
18.7.82
Common
-
3
Cape Arid 
Esp
Esp
NP
23.11.85
Frequent
-
4
Mt Ragged 
Esp
Esp
NP
23.4.93
100+ Seedl.
Post-fire
5
Middle Island 
Esp
Esp
NR
14.11.74
-
-
6
Sandy Hook Is.
Esp
Esp
NR
10.11.50
-
-
7*
Mt Baring 
Esp
Esp
NP
25.4.93
200+
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
L. apiculatus is widespread and common in localised areas east of Esperance and occurs in three conservation reserves.

403
References
Bentham (1869).

404
Leucopogon brevicuspis Benth.
EPACRIDACEAE
An erect shrub, with or without hairs on the branches and foliage.  Leaves are broadly oblong (about 12 mm long) or
slightly broader towards the apex, convex, with recurved margins or nearly flat, and have a minute, rigid spine at the tip.
Very short clusters (spike) of 2 or 3 flowers are borne in the leaf axils.  The small bracts have a minute sharp point;
bracteoles are about half as long as the calyx; sepals (4 mm) are softly-hairy and acutely pointed at the tip.  The corolla
tube is as long as the calyx; the corolla lobes are rather shorter and erect at the base.  Anthers are obtuse and lack sterile
tips.  The ovary is shiny and 5-celled.  Fruit is ovoid-oblong (about 6 mm) with a very hard exterior.
Leucopogon brevicuspis is very closely related to L. propinquus which has rigid, linear leaves.
Flowering Period:  March - April
Distribution and Habitat
Bentham (1869) indicates 
L. brevicuspis was represented by two specimens, one collected in the Stirling Range and
another from an unspecified locality, collected by Drummond.  Recent specimens with affinity to this taxon have been
collected from Frank Hann National Park, north-east of Mt Heywood, Mt Ney, and towards Israelite Bay. 
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Stirling Range 
Alb
?Plgt
NP
1869
-
-
2
Frank Hann 
Esp
Rav
NP
20.11.85
Frequent
-
3
Mt Ney 
Esp
Esp
NR
7.84
-
-
4
Mt Heywood,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
9.11.80
Scattered
-
5*
Point Malcolm,N 
Esp
Esp
NR
19.4.93
2
Fair
6*
Sheoaks Hill 
Esp
Esp
NR
22.4.93
5+
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
Further taxonomic work is required to determine the distinguishing characters of 
L. brevicuspis and which specimens in
the Western Australian Herbarium are within this taxon.
References
Bentham (1869).

405
Melaleuca incana subsp. tenella (Benth.) Barlow
MYRTACEAE
A shrub, 1 m tall, which is hairless except for the shortly-hairy inflorescence axis.  Leaves are arranged in threes,
narrowly ovate (4-9 x <1 mm), obtuse and slightly thickened at the apex, curve backwards, and have 10-15 large glands
on the lower surface.  The inflorescence is a crowded spike or head (5-25 mm) of 10-35 flowers; bracts (1.2-2 x 1 mm)
are persistent to anthesis; sepals (0.6 mm) are persistent to mature fruit.  There are 3-10 stamens (4-6 mm) per bundle
with filaments white to yellow.  Fruits are shortly bell-shaped with an elongated base (2-4 x 3-5 mm), sometimes
compressed by mutual pressure, with persistent rounded outspread sepals. 
Melaleuca incana subsp. tenella can be distinguished from subsp. incana which usually has hairy leaves that are larger
(4-17 x 1-3 mm), 40-100 small and about 20 larger leaf glands, and longer stamens (4-8.5 mm).
Flowering Period:  August - October
Distribution and Habitat
M. incana subsp. tenella is found on the coast and adjacent inland areas from near Esperance to Duke of Orleans Bay, a
range of about 60 km.  It grows in swampy and moist areas in scrub thickets.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Cape Le Grand 
Esp
Esp
NP
3.10.74
-
-
2
Coolinup Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
14.11.93
300+
Good
3
Esperance,N Esp
Esp
-
18.9.50
-
-
4
Condingup,SE Esp
Esp
Private
21.9.68
-
-
5
Orleans Bay,N 
Esp
Esp
?Rd Res.
30.9.68
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
M. incana subsp. tenella is known in two conservation reserves.  Further surveys, especially in the Lake Warden Nature
Reserve and the Cape Le Grand National Park, are recommended.
References
Quinn 
et al. (1992).

406
Melaleuca macronychia subsp. trygonoides Cowley
MYRTACEAE
A tangled or spreading shrub, to 4 m tall.  Leaves are spirally arranged on the stem, broadly elliptic (6-13 mm wide) and
undulate at the margin.  The inflorescence is a spike of 30-65 flowers on an axis 23-47 mm long with a stalk (15-25
mm).  The calyx tube is barrel-shaped (1.5 mm).  Stamens are red with 23-34 per bundle; claws are 8-11 mm long.
Fruits are compressed barrel-shaped (3.5 x 5 mm), papery in texture and the valves are deeply recessed below the
aperture.
Melaleuca macronychia subsp. trygonoides differs from subsp. macronychia which has obovate to broadly obovate, flat
leaves, fewer stamens (20-23 per bundle) and longer claws (11-17 mm).
Flowering Period:  February, July, August, October
Distribution and Habitat
M. macronychia subsp. trygonoides is found between Lake Johnston and Coolgardie, with a known range of 90 km.  It
grows in shallow sandy soil on the margins of granite outcrops amongst scrub thicket, associated with 
Acacia,
Allocasuarina, Leptospermum and Melaleuca.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
McDermid Rock 
Esp
Dund
VCL
15.2.81
-
-
2
Lake View Rock 
Esp
Dund
VCL
8.2.67
-
-
3
Queen Victoria Rocks 
Gold
Cool
NR
21.10.88
Common
-
4
Cave Hill 
Gold
Cool
VCL
23.10.88
Common
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
M. macronychia subsp. trygonoides appears to have a specific habitat requirement around granite rocks, with known
populations occurring in a relatively remote area of Crown Land.  Further opportunistic survey of granite outcrops west
and north-west of Norseman is recommended.
References
Cowley 
et al. (1990).

407
Myriocephalus appendiculatus Benth.
ASTERACEAE
White-tip Myriocephalus
An erect annual herb, to 20 cm tall, which is sparingly branched and covered in loose, woolly and short glandular hairs.
Leaves are linear or narrowly ovate (5-35 x 1-5 mm), acute at the apex, and slightly dilated at the base which partially
clasps the stem.  Solitary compound heads (up to 15 mm diam.) are borne at the ends of erect stems; bracts of the
general involucre have white spreading tips nearly 2 mm long.  The numerous partial heads are 4-6 flowered. Achenes
are minutely hairy.  Pappus are absent or of 1 or 2 microscopic scales.
Flowering Period:  September - December
Distribution and Habitat
Myriocephalus appendiculatus is widespread from Eneabba to Mt Ragged, with the majority of known populations
occurring in the Perth region.  It grows in coarse sand and clay, often in moist depressions, in low open woodland.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Ragged,W 
Esp
Esp
NP
16.11.76
-
-
2
Meekatharra,S Ger
Cue
-
7.10.89
-
-
3
Ellen Brook 
Swan
Metro
NR
30.11.84
-
-
4
Upper Swan 
Swan
Metro
-
11.11.59
-
-
5
Eneabba,S Moora
Car
-
18.9.77
-
-
6
Lake Indoon,W 
Moora
Car
-
8.9.79
Dense
-
7
Gillingara Moora
VP
-
13.11.06
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
M. appendiculatus is a widespread annual which has been poorly collected.  Its extensive distribution suggests that
further populations should exist.  Further survey is recommended.
References
Bentham (1867), Grieve and Blackall (1982), Marchant 
et al. (1987).

408
Persoonia scabra R.Br.
PROTEACEAE
An erect shrub with branches covered in short hairs.  Leaves are crowded, linear-lanceolate (12-25 mm), contracted at
the base, 1-nerved, and rough to touch (scabrous).  Yellow flowers (10 mm) are borne on short stalks in leaf axils and
are either hairless or sprinkled with a few hairs.  The ovary is shiny with a straight style and stigma.
Bentham (1870) considered 
Persoonia flexifolia and P. spathulata to be very closely related, with differences observed
being only "very slight, no more than what we constantly observe between different specimens of other species".
Flowering Period:  Unknown
Distribution and Habitat
P. scabra was collected last century by Robert Brown from near Lucky Bay.  It is known from the Frank Hann National
Park in the "Peak Charles-Mount Ragged area" (Weston 1984).
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Lucky Bay 
Esp
Esp
NP
1802
-
-
2
Frank Hann 
Esp
Rav
NP
1978
-
-
3?
Peak Charles -
Esp
Esp
-
-
-
-
Mt Ragged area
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
According to P. Weston (personal communication) "the name 
Persoonia scabra R.Br. has been misapplied in Western
Australia (by Blackall and Grieve and by the State Herbarium) to an undescribed species from the Lake Grace-
Newdegate-Ravensthorpe area.... The 'real' 
P. scabra R.Br. was not recollected until 1978 by Doug Monk in Frank Hann
National Park, but has been collected a number of times since then by Ken Newbey in the Frank Hann-Peak Charles-Mt
Ragged area.  It is not endangered by land clearance at present".
At present, there are no 'real' 
P. scabra specimens in the Western Australian Herbarium.  Further taxonomic work is
recommended along with surveys in the Frank Hann National Park to obtain representative specimens of this taxon.
References
Bentham (1870).

409
Pityrodia chrysocalyx (F.Muell.) C.A.Gardner
CHLOANTHACEAE
An erect, branched shrub, 30-75 cm tall, with the stem and branches densely clothed in scales; branches are arranged in
threes.  Leaves are small, broadly ovate or elliptic-ovate (2-6 x 1-4 mm), reflexed, shortly pointed, margins are rolled
slightly backwards to form a shallow concavity on the lower side; the upper side is smooth, glutinous and underneath is
covered in scurfy scales.  Flowers are solitary in the axil of upper leaves; the leaf-like bracts (2-4 x 1.5-2 mm) are
reflexed.  The calyx (5-7 mm) has a long tube and 5 short lobes, and is densely scaly on the outside but smooth inside.
The white corolla (9-12 mm) has stellate hairs on the back of the lobes and is mostly smooth inside except for a dense
ring of hairs above the ovary; the lower lip is broadly elliptic and the other 4 similar lobes are oblong-elliptic; stamens
are exserted above the corolla tube; the globose ovary is densely hairy; the style is shortly 2-lobed at the tip.  The fruit
(4-5 x 2-3 mm) is covered in hairs and has a depression at the top and 2 opposite, short projections at the distal end.
Flowering Period:  October - November
Distribution and Habitat
Pityrodia chrysocalyx is distributed between Scaddan and Norseman, extending westwards to Lake Tay and eastwards
to Mt Ridley.  It grows in sand and sandy loam in open shrub mallee and woodland communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Scaddan,N 
Esp
Esp
?MRWA Rd Res.
13.11.76
-
-
1b
Grass Patch,S
Esp
Esp
-
2.10.81
-
-
2
Grass Patch,N 
Esp
Esp
-
5.9.62
-
-
3
Lake Tay,E 
Esp
Esp
VCL
11.11.79
Common
-
4
Mt Ridley,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
13.10.90
200+
-
5
Norseman Esp
Dund
-
14.10.67
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
A survey between Scaddan and Grass Patch in 1992 failed to relocate this taxon.  It is not known to occur in any
conservation reserve.  Further survey is required.
References
Munir (1979).

410
Platysace haplosciadea (Benth.) C.Norman
APIACEAE
A low, spreading perennial herb, to 25 cm tall.  Stems are from a perennial rootstock, apparently leafless, cylindrical or
angular, erect and rush-like, but the upper branches often flexuose or recurved.  Leaves are few and minute.  Numerous
white or pale pink flowers are arranged on short slender stalks in simple umbels at the ends of stems.  Involucral bracts
are linear and reflexed.  Styles have a thick conical base.  Fruit is smooth and flattish (2 x 2 mm), the dorsal edge almost
winged, the lateral ribs are thickened and almost as prominent as the somewhat turgid centres of the carpels, but separate
from them on each side by a narrow furrow.  
Flowering Period:  October - December
Distribution and Habitat
Platysace haplosciadea is known from the Cape Arid and Cape Le Grand National Parks and a disjunct population
north-west of Margaret River.  It grows in white sand in winter-wet areas in low heath communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
'Hill 49'
Esp
Esp
NP
19.11.79
-
-
1b
Mt Le Grand
Esp
Esp
NP
12.12.60
-
-
1c
Lucky Bay
Esp
Esp
NP
10.10.74
Common
-
1d
Rossiter Bay
Esp
Esp
NP
7.11.82
-
-
1e
Ranger's residence
Esp
Esp
NP
13.11.89
Plentiful
-
2
Cape Arid 
Esp
Esp
NP
29.11.71
-
-
3
Yelverton forest 
Bsltn
Aug
-
8.11.89
Abundant
-
4
Gales Brook
-
-
-
1800s
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
P. haplosciadea appears to be well represented in the Cape Le Grand National Park where it should remain secure.
Further opportunistic survey along the coast, east of Esperance, is recommended.
References
Bentham (1866).

411
Pomaderris intangenda F.Muell.
RHAMNACEAE
A spreading shrub, to 90 cm tall, with spiny branches and extremely hairy branchlets.  Leaves are small, oblong to
wedge-shaped (10-25 mm) with toothed or lobed margins near the tip, hairless, dark green above and pale green
beneath.  The white, tubular flowers are small and borne on singly in leaf axils on short stalks; the 5 calyx lobes are
broadly triangular (2 mm) and fall off early.  Fruit is a large 3-chambered capsule (8 mm).
Flowering Period:  June - August
Distribution and Habitat
Pomaderris intangenda is known from Mt Ridley and north of Westonia and Boorabbin.  The type specimen was
collected before 1876 from 'between the port of Esperance Bay and the mountains of Frazer's Range' (Mueller 1876).  It
is possible that the collection was from the Mt Ridley population.  This species grows in humus-rich soil on the slopes of
granite outcrops, in tall shrubland or scrub.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Geeraning Mer
West
NR.
11.9.89
2

Dead
2
Walyamoning Mer
West
NR
11.9.89
2
Undisturbed
3
Yanneymooning Mer
West
NR
11.9.89
12

Dying
4
Yanneymooning,N Mer
West
Private
12.9.89
4
Undisturbed
5
Mt Walter 
Gold
Cool
VCL
16.9.81
2
-
6
Mt Ridley 
Esp
Esp
VCL
23.5.93
-
Good
7
Donkey Rocks 
Gold
Men
VCL
8.6.89
Abundant
-
8
Ularring Gold
Men
Pastoral 
Lease
16.6.88
Frequent
-
9
Bates Cave 
Nar
Kon
-
9.7.87
-
-
10
The Humps 
Nar
Kon
-
3.9.76
-
-
11
Eaglestone Hill 
Mer
Nun
-
13.8.72
-
-
12
Nungarin Rock 
Mer
Nun
-
13.8.72
-
-
13
near Bencubbin 
Mer
MtM
-
2.6.22
-
-
14
Billyacatting Hill 
Mer
Tra
NR
2.9.77
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
P. intangenda is widespread, especially in the Merredin District, although according to Mollemans et al. (1993), it
usually occurs in low numbers.  The habitat in which this species grows, however, is not likely to be cleared for
agriculture.  The population at Mt Ridley is within an area that has been proposed for vesting with the Esperance Shire. 
References
Leigh 
et al. (1984), Mollemans et al. (1993), Mueller (1876), Newbey (1983).

412
Siegfriedia darwinioides C.A.Gardner
RHAMNACEAE
An erect shrub, to 80 cm tall, with smooth purplish-brown bark.  Leaves are opposite, oblong (15-30 x 6-8 mm), obtuse
at the tip, and the midrib partly impressed into the upper surface; the margins roll backwards tightly towards the midrib
(revolute); the upper surface is dark green and shiny, while underneath is pink and densely hairy; stalks are up to 8 mm
long.  Small clusters of yellowish flowers (cyme) form pseudo-heads at the ends of short branchlets.  There are usually
10-12 petal-like bracts, which are orbicular (1.8 mm diam.), overlapping, leathery, irregularly toothed, prominently
nerved, red to pale pink; the outer bracts are usually empty and the intermediate ones often have a cluster of 3 or 4
flowers in their axils; the terminal cluster consists of 6-10 flowers.  Each flower has a 4-5 lobed calyx tube (5 mm) and
stamens (6-7 mm) that extend beyond the tube.  True petals are absent.
Flowering Period:  February - April, June, August - October
Distribution and Habitat
Siegfriedia darwinioides is distributed between the Pallinup River and Starvation Boat Harbour, a range of 180 km.  It
grows on stony red loam or kaolinic-lateritic breakaway, in mallee scrub or woodland communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Short 
Alb
Rav
Shire Res.
16.12.92
200+
Healthy
2
Bandalup Alb
Rav
VCL
8.9.93
300+
Healthy
3
Mt Desmond 
Alb
Rav
VCL
8.9.93
Scattered
Healthy
4
Mt McMahon 
Alb
Rav
VCL
4.91
100+
Healthy
5
Eyre Range 
Alb
Rav
NP
2.11.65
-
-
6a
Gnowellen Rd 
Alb
?Alb
-
25.6.76
-
-
6b
Corackerup
Alb
?Alb
NR
-
Few
-
7
Starvation Boat 
Esp
Esp
-
8.25
-
-
Harbour
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The majority of known populations of 
S. darwinioides occur in the Ravensthorpe Range.  Negotiations are presently
being undertaken between the Shire, DEP and CALM to vest this area as a reserve.  Further survey in the Fitzgerald
River National Park is recommended.
References
Gardner (1933), Robinson and Coates (1995).

413
Sphenotoma parviflorum F.Muell.
EPACRIDACEAE
Paper Heath
A slender, erect perennial, 15-30 cm tall, with a few branches above 25 cm.  Leaves are lanceolate-subulate (rarely 12
mm), mostly ciliate on the margins, the lower ones more or less spreading, but not recurved, all the rest are pressed close
to the stem.  A dense, ovate cluster of white flowers (spike) forms at the end of the stem; each flower is about 12 mm
long within an ovate, pointed bract which is at least as long as the calyx.  Sepals (4 mm) are pointed at the tip.  The
corolla tube is as long as the calyx, and the lobes are only half as long as the tube.  The ovary is hairless.
Sphenotoma parviflorum is very similar to S. gracile which has corolla lobes about equal in length to the corolla tube. 
Flowering Period:  ?October
Distribution and Habitat
The type of 
S. parviflorum (lodged at Kew, England) shows the locality as being "Thomas River and Cape Le Grand".  
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Thomas River &
Esp
Esp
?NP
?1802
-
-
Cape Le Grand
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
S. parviflorum is taxonomically poorly defined.  Many of the specimens in the Western Australian Herbarium may
actually be the very similar 
S. gracile which is relatively common along the south coast (J. Powell, personal
communication).  Taxonomic work is urgently required on these taxa to correctly identify these specimens.
References
Bentham (1869).

414
Verticordia verticordina (F.Muell.) A.S.George
MYRTACEAE
A low, dense shrub, 10-25 cm tall. Leaves are linear, semi-cylindrical or triquetrous (6 mm) and opposite.  Greenish-
white flowers are borne on stalks (2-4 mm) in the upper axils of the short branchlets, forming a dense flat-topped leafy
corymb.  The calyx tube is hemispherical (3 mm diam.), softly-hairy with longer hairs at the base along with a dense ring
of white hairs.  Sepals are ovate (4 mm) and very shortly and irregularly toothed-hairy.  Petals are rather shorter than the
sepals and entire with a broad, dark-coloured central line.  Stamens are united for nearly 2 mm above the calyx tube;
staminodes form a distinct outer series.  The red style is very long.  The ovary has 2 ovules.
Flowering Period:  August - October
Distribution and Habitat
Verticordia verticordina is known from between Cheetup Hill and Price Hill, a range of 90 km.  It grows in peaty sand
or sandy clay over granite or limestone, in low open heath communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 3
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Price Hill 
Esp
Esp
NP
9.12.60
-
-
2a
Cheetup Hill,N 
Esp
Esp
NP
17.8.89
Abundant
-
2b
Orleans Bay,N
Esp
Esp
NP
9.10.92
1 000+
Healthy
2c
Orleans Bay,N
Esp
Esp
Shire Res.
9.10.92
1 000+
Healthy
3
Condingup,SE Esp
Esp
Private
21.9.68
-
-
4
Mungliginup Creek 
Esp
Esp
-
30.9.68
-
-
5
Mt Baring 
Esp
Esp
NP
28.10.67
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Possibly susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
V. verticordina is known in the Cape Le Grand and Cape Arid National Parks, where it should remain secure.  Further
opportunistic survey in areas between the two Parks is recommended.
References
Bentham (1867).

Document Outline

  • esperance_wmp_21.pdf
  • esperance_drf
  • esperance_pri1
  • esperance_pri2
  • esperance_pri3


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