Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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References
                                                          
#
 now Priority 4 (updated at December 1999)

20
Hoffman and Brown (1992).

21
Caladenia voigtii Hopper & A.P.Brown ms
ORCHIDACEAE
Voigt's Spider Orchid, Mohawk Spider Orchid
An erect, tuberous herb, 8-20 cm tall, with 1 or rarely 2 flowers.  Flowers (2-3 x 1-2 cm) are pale yellow-green with red-
pink stripes; the sepals (except the dorsal sepal) and petals hang downwards and the labellum is rounded with a dense
band of wedge-shaped calli that are white with red tips.  The stems and narrow leaves (50-150 x 6 mm) are hairy.
This recently described species was previously thought to be 
Caladenia cristata which occurs near Miling, north of
Perth. 
Flowering Period:  August - October
Distribution and Habitat
C. voigtii ms is a widespread species occurring from near Bremer Range to south-west of Balladonia, a range of about
240 km.  It is found in a variety of habitats, ranging from shallow soil pockets on granite outcrops to the margins of
inland salt lakes.  It grows in open low woodland and open scrub communities associated with 
Eucalyptus flocktoniae,
E. cylindriflora, E. platycorys, E. eremophila or Callitris verrucosa.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
#
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Coobaninya,W 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.8.89
200-300
Good
2
Dowak West 
Esp
Esp
Private
17.9.77
-
-
3a
Cristata Compound 
Esp
Esp
Private
13.9.91
20+
Average
3b
Dowak East
Esp
Esp
Private
10.9.78
-
-
4
90 Mile Tank
Esp
Dund
VCL
28.9.88
40+
Good
5
Mt Newmont 
Esp
Esp
VCL
6.9.90
100+
Good
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
Although 
C. voigtii ms is widespread, the known populations are mostly small and none are known to occur in a
conservation reserve.  The populations occurring in Vacant Crown Land are undisturbed.  Three populations occur on
private property near Dowak and at least one of these has been fenced by the W.A. Native Orchid Study Group; grazing
by rabbits is of concern in these areas.  Monitoring and liaison with the property owners is required to ensure that these
populations are appropriately managed and conserved.
References
Hoffman and Brown (1992), Hopper 
et al. (1990).
                                                          
#
 now Priority 4 (updated at December 1999)

22
Conostylis lepidospermoides Hopper
HAEMODORACEAE
Sedge Conostylis
A tufted, sedge-like perennial plant, up to 35 cm tall and 40 cm wide.  The flat, narrow leaves (20-35 cm) are yellowish-
green and have margins with 2 rows of short, dark brown bristles.  Up to 6 flowers are borne in a loose inflorescence
(cyme) on a scape 1-4 cm tall, i.e. much shorter than the leaves.  The yellow perianth (up to 20 mm) is deeply divided
into lobes (6-10 mm) and covered in long hairs.  The stamens have large anthers (5 mm) and are inserted 5-7 mm above
the ovary; the style is about 10 mm long.
A distinctive species with no obvious close relatives.  
Conostylis lepidospermoides is inconspicuous when not in flower
due to the slender sedge-like leaves.  The flowers, however, are distinctive and amongst the largest in the subgenus.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
C. lepidospermoides occurs east of Ravensthorpe and extends northwards to Ninety Mile Tank, a range of about 120
km.  It grows on flat or gently undulating plains in yellow or grey sand over laterite or clay, in low heath and sedge
communities with scattered emergent 
Lambertia inermis, Banksia media, Eucalyptus tetragona and other mallees.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
90 Mile Tank,W 
Esp
Dund
VCL
17.10.74
-
-
2
Rav,E 
Esp
Rav
MRWA Rd Res.
16.11.92
3+
Average
3
Middle Road 
Esp
Rav
Shire Rd Res
10.9.93
500+
Good
4a
West Point Rd 
Esp
Rav
Shire Rd Res.
6.9.83
-
-
4b
West Point Rd
Esp
Rav
Shire Rd Res.
5.10.79
-
-
4c*
West Point Rd
Esp
Rav
Shire Rd Res.
30.8.92
24
Good
5
90 Mile Tank,SW 
Esp
Rav
NP
27.10.80
Rare
-
17.9.93
Not found
-
6
Munglinup,E Esp
?Esp
-
14.10.68
-
-
7
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
Private
16.10.68
-
-
8
Neds Corner Rd 
Esp
Esp
Private
26.9.68
-
-
9
Burlabup Creek 
Alb
Rav
MRWA Rd Res.
27.9.68
-
-
10
Mills Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
14.9.92
1
Fair
11*
Rockhole Rd 
Esp
Rav
Shire Rd Res.
15.9.92
50
Good
12
?West Point Rd 
Esp
Rav
Shire Rd Res.
3.10.83
-
-
13
West Point Rd 
Esp
Rav
Shire Rd Res.
11.9.92
15
Post-fire
14
West Point Rd 
Esp
Rav
Shire Rd Res.
10.9.92
50-100
Good
15
Northover Soak 
Esp
Rav
VCL
21.9.79
Occasional
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
This species readily resuckers after a hot fire, as seen at a one population (no. 13) beside West Point Road.
Regenerating plants were in bud and flower within two years of the fire.  Response to other disturbances such as weed
invasion and grazing are not known.

23
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
Although widespread, most known populations of 
C. lepidospermoides are small and occur on road reserves adjacent to
cleared farmland.  The condition of the majority of the road reserves is good, however the populations' long-term
viability is questionable, particularly if weed invasion occurs.  The largest known population (no. 3) is on a Shire road
reserve adjacent to a gravel pit; further extension of this pit could jeopardise the survival of the population.  Markers are
recommended at all roadside populations.
In 1968, three populations (nos. 6-8) were found in the Shire of Esperance.  Extensive land clearing for agriculture has
occurred since that date, particularly in the Cascade area (pop. nos. 7 and 8); it is possible that these populations no
longer exist.  Resurvey of these localities is urgently required.
Only one population (no. 5) of 
C. lepidospermoides is known to occur in a conservation reserve.  It has been found
twice at this site in Frank Hann National Park, in 1979 and 1980, but was not found during a survey in 1993.
Apparently it is rare at this site.
Further survey in Vacant Crown Land between West Point Rd and Frank Hann National Park is required.
References
Hopper (1987b), Hopper 
et al. (1990).

24
Daviesia microcarpa Crisp
PAPILIONACEAE
Norseman Pea
Sprawling shrub with many long, weak, tangled stems, to 0.4 m tall and 1 m broad.  The cylindrical phyllodes ('leaves',
8-20 x 0.5-0.8 mm) have a stiff, sharp point and are spirally arranged along the branches.  Usually, one flower (rarely 2)
is borne per leaf axil.  Flowers are orange with pinkish-red on the veins and towards the centre.  Pods are very small (4 x
3 mm), have raised reticulate venation, and an apex which is more or less obtuse.
Daviesia microcarpa is superficially similar to the narrow-leaved form of D. ulicifolia, however the leaves of the latter
species are triangular in cross-section.  Also, all forms of 
D. ulicifolia have spine-tipped branchlets, phyllodes which are
never cylindrical, and pods which have a tapering acute apex.
Flowering Period:  August - September
Distribution and Habitat
The only known population and type locality for 
D. microcarpa is on a very disturbed verge of the Eyre Highway, north-
east of Norseman.  It grows in red clay loam with calcrete nodules, in association with species of 
Eremophila,
Eucalyptus and Atriplex.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Norseman 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
13.1.85
13
-
1987-1992
Not found
-
29.11.93
17
Regen.
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed susceptible but occurs in an area where 
Phytophthora is not considered a threat.
Summary and Recommendations
Main Roads W.A. has developed a management strategy to attempt to regenerate this population.  Recovery of this
population should be monitored over the next five years.
A quantity of seed was collected in 1993 and sent to Kings Park for propagation. 
References
Crisp (1983).

25
Drummondita hassellii var. longifolia Paul G.Wilson 
RUTACEAE
Peak Charles Drummondita
A shrub which grows up to 1 m tall, with glossy somewhat spreading leaves.  Leaves are alternate, cylindrical (20 mm
long), wrinkled and have a sharp, curved point at the tip; they produce a scent when cut.  The solitary flowers are up to
25 mm long; the yellowish calyx is hairless with 5 small sepals; petals are large and red; the 5 fertile stamens alternate
with 5 sterile ones and unite to form an elongate pink-red tube which is covered in long white hairs; the style is red and
has an enlarged flat end which protrudes above the stamens.  The dry fruit opens by 3 valves and is normally 3-seeded.
Drummondita hasellii var. longifolia can be distinguished from other taxa of Drummondita by its leaves which are at
least twice as long as other varieties.
Flowering Period:  April - May, July, September - November
Distribution and Habitat
D. hassellii var. longifolia is restricted to the Peak Charles area.  It grows in granite crevices in sandy clay on hillsides in
open shrubland.  Associated genera include 
Opercularia, Melaleuca, Leptospermum, Eucalyptus and Calothamnus.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No. Population
District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1 Peak 
Charles
Esp
Esp
NP
18.9.93
400+
Post-fire
Response to Disturbance
D. hassellii var. longifolia is known only from one population in Peak Charles National Park, which was burnt by a hot
fire in January 1991.  Eighteen months after the fire most of the plants observed were vegetative and appeared to be
seedlings (single-stemmed), only 3 larger plants were seen that were resuckering and had a couple of flowers.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Regular monitoring of the known population is required to determine the time for the young plants to set viable seed
after the 1991 fire; this will be important to determine the appropriate interfire period for this species and fire
management of the area.
References
Wilson (1971).

26
Eremophila denticulata F.Muell. subsp. denticulata MYOPORACEAE
Fitzgerald Eremophila, Toothed Eremophila
A tall, straggly shrub to 2 m tall, with sticky, glutinous young branches and leaves.  Young plants are leafy and compact,
whereas older plants have leaves clustered at the ends of branches. The leaves (30-50 mm) are conspicuously toothed
along the margins.  The attractive red flowers are tubular with the lower corolla lobe cut to form a distinct lip, and are
borne on long S-shaped stalks.
Flowering Period:  October - January
Distribution and Habitat
Eremophila denticulata subsp. denticulata occurs in two areas about 70 km apart, south-east of Ravensthorpe and east
of the Oldfield River.  It is only known from areas that have been disturbed in alluvial soils along rivers and on loamy
clay over granite.  Nearby plant communities may include tall mallet woodland.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No. Population
District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a Moir 
Rd,W
Alb
Rav
Private
14.12.92
300
Dying
1b Moir 
Rd,W
Alb
Rav
NP
14.12.92
500
Dying
2a
Moir Track 
Alb
Rav
NP
6.1.92
15
Healthy
2b 
Moir Track,W
Alb
Rav
NP
10.2.93
5-10 000
Dying
?24.4.93
-
Burnt
3 Hamersley 
River
Alb
Rav
NP
-
-
-
4 Cheadanup
Esp
Rav
NR
1.11.93

Mature
Dying
1.11.93
2 000+ 
Post-fire
Seedlings
Response to Disturbance
E. denticulata subsp. denticulata appears to be a disturbance opportunist, with seed germination being stimulated by fire
or soil disturbance.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
Until recently, the only known population of 
E. denticulata subsp. denticulata was located on private property in a
cleared paddock, and was fenced off by the property owner in 1989.  In January 1986, the population numbered 8 000-
10 000 plants, but by December 1992 had declined to about 300 plants.  Currently, the biggest population, known from
a chained firebreak in the north east of the Fitzgerald River National Park, was consumed in a control burn in autumn
1993 (Robinson and Coates 1995).

27
Summary and Recommendations (cont’d)
Monitoring the populations which have been recently burnt (nos. 2 and 4) to assess post-fire regeneration and
reproductive biology is recommended.  As well, plots should be established in any populations subjected to fuel
reduction burns to assess post-fire relative to pre-fire densities.
Further survey is required, especially in those areas recently burnt or otherwise disturbed.
References
Robinson and Coates (1995).

28
Eremophila denticulata subsp. trisulcata Chinnock ms 
MYOPORACEAE
Kumquat Eremophila
A compact shrub slightly over 1 m tall, which looks very similar to a kumquat.  Leaves are bright green, glossy, oblong-
lanceolate and serrated on the margins.  The pink-red flowers are held on long S-shaped stalks that curve up under the
flowers.  The 4 upper corolla lobes form the upper lip of the flower and the fifth lobe is cut much lower than the others
forming a distinct lower lip.  The stamens are exserted beyond the corolla.  After flowering the calyx is scarcely
enlarged.
Flowering Period:  October - November
Distribution and Habitat
Eremophila denticulata subsp. trisulcata ms is known only from two areas about 20 km apart; the first lies east of Mt
Buraminya where three sub-populations are distributed over 5 km, the other population lies south-east of Mt
Willgonarinya.  It grows in fine loam over limestone.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
#
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No. Population
District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a Mt 
Buraminya,E
Esp
Esp
VCL
31.5.90
100+
-
1b Mt 
Buraminya,E
Esp
Esp
VCL
5.90
20
-
1c 
Mt Buraminya,E
Esp
Esp
VCL
8.90
1 000-2 000
-
4 Mt 
Willgonarinya,SE
Esp
Esp
VCL
9.86
40
Dying
Response to Disturbance
Like 
E. denticulata subsp. denticulata, this species is assumed to be a disturbance opportunist.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
E. denticulata subsp. trisulcata ms is restricted to old mining tracks where the middle and upper storey plants have been
cleared (W. Archer, personal communication).  Resurvey of populations and further study of this taxon is required,
especially after fire, to confirm whether it is a disturbance opportunist.
References
Grieve and Blackall (1982).
                                                          
#
 now Priority 4 (updated at December 1999)

29
Eucalyptus cerasiformis Brooker & Blaxell
MYRTACEAE
Cherry-fruited Mallee
An erect mallee growing up to 3 m tall with smooth, mottled grey over salmon-pink bark.  The pith of branchlets is
glandular.  Juvenile leaves are lanceolate (30-40 x 6-15 mm).  Adult leaves are yellow-green and glossy, alternate and
narrowly lanceolate (50-80 x 7-12 mm); glands are prominent on both surfaces.  Inflorescences are borne on a slender,
cylindrical stalk (peduncle, 15-40 mm long) that curves downwards bearing 7 yellow flowers, each borne on a long stalk
(pedicel, 10-12 mm).  Buds are ovoid, contracted at the middle and have a yellow-brown, conical bud cap which
contrasts with the green calyx tube.  The urn-shaped fruits (12-15 x 6-9 mm) have a thick rim, depressed disc and 4-5
enclosed valves.  Seed is brown and ovoid in shape.
This species is closely related to 
E. dielsii from which it differs in its smaller buds and fruits and in the urn-shaped fruits
which are without a flared rim.  It is also somewhat similar to 
E. erythronema but can be distinguished again by its urn-
shaped fruits.
The common name of 
E. cerasiformis is a reference to the pendulous buds which look like bunches of cherries.  Native
bees have been observed pollinating the flowers.
Flowering Period:  August - March, June
Distribution and Habitat
E. cerasiformis is known from a restricted area between Hyden and Norseman, over a 50 km range.  It is usually found
in depressions of undulating hills in gravelly reddish loam, where it grows in low open forest with a dense heath
understorey, in association with 
E. salubris, Melaleuca uncinata, Acacia and Casuarina spp.  
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Ant Rock,NW 
Esp 
Dund
VCL (Mining Lease)
3.3.88
189
Good
& Shire Rd Res.
2a
Mt Day 
Esp
Dund 
VCL (Mining Lease)
3.3.88
62 
Good
2b
Mt Day
Esp
Dund
VCL (Mining Lease)
15.6.88
20 
Good
2c
Mt Day
Esp
Dund
VCL (Mining Lease)
15.6.88
70+
Good
3a
Round Top Hill,SSW
Esp
Dund
Shire Rd Res. }
3.3.88
40
Good
3b
Round Top Hill,SSW
Esp
Dund
VCL
}
4a
Round Top Hill 
Esp
Dund 
VCL (Mining Lease)
9.5.89
-
-
4b
Round Top Hill
Esp
Dund
VCL (Mining Lease)
9.5.89
-
-
5a
Round Top Hill,S 
Esp
Dund 
VCL (Mining Lease)
9.5.89
-
-
5b
Round Top Hill,S
Esp
Dund
VCL (Mining Lease)
9.5.89
-
-
6
Maggie Hays Hill,NW
Esp
Dund 
VCL (Mining Lease)
10.5.89
-
-
7
Maggie Hays Hill,N 
Esp
Dund 
VCL (Mining Lease)
10.5.89
-
-
8
Bremer Range 
Esp
Dund 
VCL
25.10.64
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

30
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Three of the known populations (nos. 1, 3 and 5) of 
E. cerasiformis grow beside the Hyden-Norseman Road and could
be disturbed during maintenance or upgrading of this track; population no. 1 has already been disturbed along the verge
of the track.  Road markers are required.
Monitoring of populations on mining tenements and ongoing liaison with exploration companies is required.
Staff at Kings Park have propagated this species from seed.
References
Brooker and Blaxell (1978), Elliot and Jones (1986).

31
Eucalyptus insularis Brooker
MYRTACEAE
Twin Peak Island Mallee
A small, slender-stemmed mallee (1.5-2 m tall) in the Cape Le Grand area, and a tall mallee (1.4-8 m) on North Twin
Peak Island.  Bark is smooth, red-brown, pale grey, yellowish-green or greenish-grey; in the tall form there is a fibrous,
red-brown basal stocking.  Larger specimens have branches which are conspicuously wrinkled underneath at the base.
Branchlets are 4-sided and are often reddish when young.  Juvenile leaves are sessile, elliptic and have toothed edges.
Older leaves are petiolate, narrowly lanceolate (to 70 x 15 mm), dull green and have a long narrow, curved point.  Buds
have a cap which is slightly narrower and shorter than the base.  Fruits (6-8 x 6 mm) are pendulous, barrel-shaped with a
thin rim and 3 or 4 valves in a sunken, shining, red-brown disc.  Seeds are brown, pyramidal or elongated.
Eucalyptus insularis is superficially similar to E. doratoxylon whose adult leaves have a very dense network of veins
and are apparently glandless; the former species has only a sparse veinal network and numerous to scattered oil glands.
E. doratoxylon has a bud scar whereas E. insularis does not.  E. doratoxylon has long peduncles (10-12 mm) which
support inflorescences of usually no more than 7 cream or yellowish-white flowers, however, 
E. insularis generally has
more than 7 white flowers and shorter peduncles (4-11 mm) which curve downwards.  
Flowering Period:  May - June, August
Distribution and Habitat
E. insularis is known from only North Twin Peak Island in the Recherche Archipelago and at one locality on Cape Le
Grand.  It grows along a watercourse on the western slopes of the island, while on the mainland 
E. insularis grows in
shallow loamy soil in crevices on the steep slope of a granite rock amongst dense scrub.  Associated species include 
E.
lehmanii, E. conferruminata and Acacia heteroclita.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Twin Peak Island 
Esp
Esp
NR
24.4.72
-
-
2
Cape Le Grand 
Esp
Esp
NP
6.10.92
50
Good
Response to Disturbance
Response to fire and other disturbances is unknown.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Both of the known populations of 
E. insularis occur in conservation reserves where they should remain secure.
Collection of seed is recommended.  Regular monitoring is required.
References
Brooker (1974), Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Elliot and Jones (1986), Rye and Hopper (1981).

32
Eucalyptus merrickiae Maiden & Blakely
MYRTACEAE
Goblet Mallee, Narrow-leaved Mallee
A mallee, 2-6 m tall, with a dense crown giving the plant an almost globular appearance.  The bark is rough and
coloured grey-brown over white.  Adult leaves are small, linear to narrowly lanceolate (60-100 x 5-9 mm) and light
green to grey-green in colour.  Leaf venation is almost nil, although there are numerous oil glands.  Each inflorescence
has up to 3 cylindrical to rounded buds (7-10 x 4-6 mm) that are borne on short stalks; the bud caps turn cherry red in
colour when nearly mature.  Flowers are white.  Fruits are cup-shaped to cylindrical, have a thick rim and a concave disc
with 3 or 4 valves; they turn mealy-white with age.  The seed is whitish-grey and ovoid.
Eucalyptus merrickiae is superficially similar to E. halophila, E. scyphocalyx and E. leptocalyx.  It can be distinguished
from these species by its rough bark, narrower leaves, and only 3 flowers per inflorescence (
E. halophila,  E.
scyphocalyx and E. leptocalyx typically have 7 or more) with short, rounded inflorescence stalks (peduncles).
Flowering Period:  July - December
Distribution and Habitat
E. merrickiae grows in sandy, loamy depressions around the salt lakes and saline flats mainly east of Truslove to north-
east of Mt Ridley.  It has a range of about 60 km for the known populations, except for a disjunct occurrence 160 km to
the east near Israelite Bay.  It occurs in open shrub mallee, often with dense scrub beneath.  Associated species include
E. halophila, E. uncinata, E. rigens and E. eremophila.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Grass Patch 
Esp
Esp
-
1968
-
-
23.9.92
Not found
-
1b
Grasspatch,S
Esp
Esp
-
23.5.24
-
-
23.9.92
Not found
-
2
Israelite Bay 
Esp
Esp
NR
21.9.76
-
-
3
Mt Ridley,NNE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
10.5.83
-
-
4
Dempster Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
25.9.92
1
Average
5a
Mt Ridley,NW 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
10.9.83
-
-
5b
Styles Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
23.9.92
3
Average
6
Mt Ridley,WSW 
Esp
Esp
-
10.9.83
-
-
7
Swan Lagoon 
Esp
Esp
NR
1984
-
-
24.9.92
Not found
-
9a
Truslove Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
3.12.88
200+
Good
22.9.92
50+
Good
9b
Truslove, E
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
22.9.92
2
Good
10
Truslove Esp
Esp
NR
22.9.92
9 Good
11
Mt Ridley,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
3.12.88
9
Good
12*
Kents Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
30.1.93
20
Good
13*
Griffiths Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
24.9.92
1+
Poor
14a*
Ridley Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
19.11.93
2+
Good
14b
Ridley Rd
Esp
Esp
NR
19.11.93
1+
Good
Known Populations (cont’d)

33
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
14c*
Ridley Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
5+
Average
& Private
19.11.93
2
Average
 
15
Truslove Rd 
Esp
Esp
-
27.5.82
-
-
16
Dowak,E Esp
Esp
-
8.33
-
-
17
Circle Valley 
Esp
Esp
-
7.11.53
-
-
* = new population; (pop. no. 12, Mulcahy 1993)
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
In the last 20 years, collections have been made of 
E. merrickiae from thirteen sites.  Some of the localities on the
specimen collections are vague and may actually refer to an already known location (e.g. pop. no. 6 may equal pop. no.
9 or 10).  The majority of known populations are scattered, small and occur in disturbed, narrow road reserves.  Many of
the localities where collections were made earlier than 1970 have possibly been cleared for agriculture or road
construction.
Although 
E. merrickiae has been recorded from four Nature Reserves, their population sizes are either unknown or
appear inadequate for long-term survival of the species.  Further survey of Nature Reserve No. 27768 (Ridley Rd), and
the populations occurring north-east of Mt Ridley (nos. 3 and 11) are required to determine the extent of populations
occurring in relatively undisturbed areas.  
Seed collections were made of this species in 1991 (L. Sweedman, Kings Park) and 1993 (M. Mulcahy, CALM).  Study
of the pollination biology and the response to fire is recommended.
References
Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Carr and Carr (1980), Elliot and Jones (1986), Hopper 
et al. (1990), Maiden and Blakely
(1925).

34
Eucalyptus platydisca L.A.S.Johnson & K.D.Hill ms
MYRTACEAE
Jimberlana Mallee
An upright to spreading, moderately dense mallee to 4 m tall with smooth, grey bark.  Leaves are elliptic as juveniles
becoming lanceolate (50-110 x 6-11 mm) when older.  They are dull blue-green, have a moderate network of veins and
scattered to numerous, often obscure oil glands.  Each inflorescence is borne on a stalk (peduncle, 7-17 mm long) which
is rounded or angular in cross-section, and has up to 7 buds (13-19 x 9-10 mm) which have beaked caps.  Flowers are
white.  Fruits have a broad disc and 4 valves which are level with the thick rim.  Seeds are shining, brown and D-shaped.
Eucalyptus platydisca ms is similar to E. diversifolia but differs in having fruit with a level disc (E. diversifolia has a
slightly ascending one), slightly larger buds (
E. diversifolia buds are 7-10 x 5-6 mm), and a very restricted habit.
Flowering Period:  March - June
Distribution and Habitat
E. platydisca ms is known only from Jimberlana Hill and Mt Norcott, north-east of Norseman, a geographic range of 18
km.  It grows in dark brown, sandy loam amongst granite boulders, in open shrub-mallee (
E. oleosa) over Triodia and
Stipa.  Associated plants include species of Allocasuarina, Solanum, Santalum and Eremophila scoparia.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Jimberlana Hill,N 
Esp
Dund
Unvested Res.
19.11.92
200+
Good
2
Mt Norcott 
Esp
Dund
VCL
2.11.90
1 500
Good
Response to Disturbance
Has been observed regenerating after a fire in 1983.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown but it occurs in an area not considered at risk from 
Phytophthora species.
Summary and Recommendations
Jimberlana Hill has been recommended as a nature reserve, however the proposal has been opposed by the Department
of Minerals and Energy.  Currently, the population remains undisturbed.
Further survey of the Dundas Hills is required.
References
Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Hopper 
et al. (1990).

35
Kennedia beckxiana (F.Muell.) F.Muell.
PAPILIONACEAE
Cape Arid Kennedia
A slender, prostrate or climbing legume with bright green or bluish-green trifoliolate leaves.  The leaflets have
prominent veins, are ovate and 25-40 mm long.  The flowers are large (35-50 mm long) and borne singly or in short
racemes which are encircled at the base by prominent, large, fused bracts.  Flowers are bright red and have a distinctive
greenish-yellow blotch at the base of the broad standard.  The big, turgid pods grow to 70 mm long and have a long,
pointed tip.
Flowering Period:  August - December
Distribution and Habitat
Kennedia beckxiana occurs between Condingup and Israelite Bay, a range of about 100 km.  It is usually found on
granite hills or in coastal sandhills around granite.  It grows in dense scrub of mixed proteaceous and myrtaceous
species.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
#
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Mt Ragged 
Esp
Esp
NP
23.4.93
50+
Post-fire
1b
Mt Ragged
Esp
Esp
NP
23.4.93
1 000+
Post-fire
1c
Mt Ragged
Esp
Esp
NP
23.4.93
500+
Post-fire
2
Gora Hill,SW 
Esp
Esp
NP
-
-
-
3
Bebenorin Hill 
Esp
Esp
VCL
13.10.83
-
-
4
Israelite Bay 
Esp
Esp
NR
-
-
-
5
Howick Hill 
Esp
Esp
-
10.44
-
-
6
Boyatup Hill 
Esp
Esp
VCL
10.3.89
10
-
7a
Little Tagon Bay Pt 
Esp
Esp
NP
26.4.93
200+
Degen.
7b
Dolphin Cove
Esp
Esp
NP
26.4.93
2
Degen.
7c
Tagon Beach
Esp
Esp
NP
30.8.89
4
-
7d
Lake Boolenup
Esp
Esp
NP
12.92
2
Fair
7e
Thomas River
Esp
Esp
NP
12.92
5
Fair
7f
Campsite
Esp
Esp
NP
12.92
1
Fair
8
Russell Range 
Esp
Esp
NP
1889
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Fire regenerates this species by breaking seed dormancy and providing the conditions for it to proliferate. This situation
was observed at Mt Ragged 26 months after the hot fire in February 1991, where 
K. beckxiana smothered dead trees and
shrubs over large areas.  Plants had already flowered and dispersed seed by this time.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
                                                          
#
 now Priority 4 (updated at December 1999)

36
Summary and Recommendations
K. beckxiana is widespread in the Cape Arid National Park where it should remain secure.  In areas which have not been
burnt for many years it is only found as a few scattered plants near outcropping granite; many of the plants at these
localities are rapidly degenerating, e.g. at Little Tagon Bay Point (pop. no. 7a) only about 20 healthy plants were found,
while more than 100 were dying and 50 were already dead.
This species, although it has a restricted distribution and is rare in mature plant communities, does not appear to be
threatened.  Reassessment of its Declared Rare Flora status is warranted.
References
Hopper 
et al. (1990), Mueller (1880), Newbey (1983).

37
Lambertia echinata R.Br. subsp. echinata PROTEACEAE
Prickly Honeysuckle
A much-branched shrub which grows up to 1 m tall, with hairy stems.  The leaves are arranged in whorls of 3, are up to
4 cm long and taper towards the stems; they are divided into 3-5 lobes with long, sharp points, and there are prominent
veins on the underside.  The 4 perianth segments of the flowers are united to form a long tube (5 cm) which is broad at
the top.  As the flowers open, the segments coil down spirally enclosing the stamens.  Flowers are pink-red and usually
in groups of 7.  The woody fruits are grey, shiny and nearly 2 cm long, including the beak.
Flowering Period:  September
Distribution and Habitat
This species is known only from one site in the Cape Le Grand National Park, a sub-population 500 m distant has died,
probably from 
Phytophthora dieback.  It grows on a mixture of pure laterite and granite sheeting on windswept coastal
slopes.  The vegetation is very rich coastal heath, with 
Dryandra and Calothamnus dominating.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Cape Le Grand 
Esp
Esp
NP
6.10.92
3
Threatened
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Field observations suggest very high susceptibility.
Summary and Recommendations
Only three 
Lambertia echinata subsp. echinata plants are known to exist, and these occur on two small 'islands' in a
gravel pit.  The other known locality, only 500 m away, had 5 plants in undisturbed vegetation but these died recently,
probably due to dieback (
Phytophthora spp.).
This species is critically endangered, particularly as is it appears to be susceptible to dieback.  A recovery plan is
urgently required to develop a management strategy for this species' survival.  Propagation should be a high priority so
that a secure number of plants can be established in cultivation.  Viable seed has been collected by the CALM
Threatened Flora Species Centre.
A detailed map showing the localities where different people have searched for this species in the Cape Le Grand
National Park is needed at the Ranger's Office.  Further survey is urgently required.
References
Bentham (1870), Curry (1992-3), Erickson 
et al. (1979), Hopper et al. (1990), Rye and Hopper (1981).

38
Myoporum turbinatum Chinnock
MYOPORACEAE
Salt Myoporum
An erect shrub to 4 m tall, which is at first multistemmed and broom-like, but eventually consists of one or a few long
slender stems with leafy branches restricted to the uppermost part.  Both branches and leaves are sticky and have
prominent wart-like protuberances.  Leaves are alternate, shiny, dark green in colour, linear (11-80 x 1 mm) and have a
midrib which is distinctly grooved on both surfaces.  The leaf margins have small conical teeth which are more obvious
towards the tip.  Flowers are dull white but often tinged with lilac and have 4 stamens which are exserted just beyond the
petals.  There are 4 to 8 flowers per axil.  Fruits are flattened, beaked at the end and have 4 ribs or wings.
Myoporum turbinatum is similar to M. platycarpum, except for the fruits which are not flattened in the latter species.
Flowering Period:  May, October - February
Distribution and Habitat
M. turbinatum is known only from a small area, less than 15 km wide, north-east of Esperance.  It occurs on the margins
of saline depressions in sandy duplex soils.  It grows in mallee-heath scrub and associated species include 
Melaleuca
sp., 
Hakea laurina and various Eucalyptus spp.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Coolinup Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
30.5.89
3
Average
2
Heywood Rd 
Esp
Esp
Private
10.10.93
4
Good
3
Heywood Rd 
Esp 
Esp
NR &            }
10.10.93
4 Alive &
Degen.
Shire Rd Res. }
4 Dead
4
Heywood Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res. }  
10.10.93
26 Alive &
Degen.
& Private       }
7 Dead
4a
Karl Berg Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res. }
10.10.92
37+ Alive &
Degen.
& Private       }
24 Dead
5
Heywood Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res. } 
10.10.92
16 Alive &
Average
& Private       }
2 Dead
6
Karl Berg Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
7.11.81
Common
-
Response to Disturbance
Some disturbance appears to be beneficial, as plants on firebreaks were observed to be in better condition than
undisturbed plants.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Although 
M. turbinatum appears to be a disturbance opportunist with individuals being relatively short-lived, it is very
geographically restricted.  The known populations of 
M. turbinatum occur on road reserves adjacent to cleared farmland

39
and have the potential to be disturbed by either road grading or firebreak maintenance activities.  Road markers are
required.
Sections of the Beaumont Group Nature Reserve (Nos. 32130 and 32783) have the potential to encompass further
populations of this species.  A small control burn in Reserve No. 32783 is recommended to regenerate and assess any
undetected populations.  This would also provide data on the response of 
M. turbinatum to fire and its life history.
The majority of plants on private property are unfenced and could eventually be grazed out.  Liaison with landholders
and fencing of populations to exclude livestock is urgently required.
References
Chinnock (1985), Hopper 
et al. (1990), Newbey (1983).

40
Myriophyllum petraeum Orchard
HALORAGACEAE
Granite Myriophyllum
An annual aquatic herb, with weak stems, 15-20 cm long.  The linear leaves are alternate, and emergent leaves are
longer and broader than submerged ones.  Separate male and female flowers are borne singly in the axils of the upper
leaves.  Flowers are sessile and 4-merous; the males have 4 white petals and 8 stamens, while the females are without
petals or sepals.  The yellow-brown to red-brown fruits have 4 cylindrical mericarps which separate freely at maturity.
This species has no close relatives.
Flowering Period:  August - September
Distribution and Habitat
Myriophyllum petraeum is distributed between Southern Cross and Mt Ragged, a geographical range of over 400 km.  It
is confined to ephemeral rock pools, 10-30 cm deep, on granitic outcrops.  The plants collapse when pools dry out at the
end of summer and must re-establish themselves from seed with the next season's rainfall.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
#
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Heywood 
Esp 
Esp
VCL
30.9.83
-
-
2
Mt Beaumont,NE 
Esp 
Esp
VCL
29.9.83
-
-
3
Moir Rock 
Esp 
Esp
VCL
15.9.76
-
-
4
25 Mile Rocks 
Esp 
Dund
NR
20.11.92
250
Good
5
Caenyie Rock 
Gold
Cool
-
26.8.81
Rare
-
6
Split Rocks 
Mer
Yil
VCL
17.10.90
80
Disturbed
7
Boyatup Hill 
Esp
Esp
VCL
1.10.68
-
-
8
Junana Rock 
Esp
Esp
NP
16.8.80
-
-
9
Mt Ragged,W 
Esp
Esp
NP
16.11.76
-
-
10
Mt Madden 
Kat
LG
Water Res.
26.10.92
500
Part-grazed
11
Nulla Nulla,N 
Mer
Yil
Private 
10.9.89
315
Undisturbed
12
Bullarragin Mer
West 
Private 2.9.89
434
Disturbed
13
Thomas River 
Esp
Esp
NP
21.11.89
-
-
14
71 Mile Rocks 
Gold
Cool
Water Res.
1988
<20
Good
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
                                                          
#
 now Priority 4 (updated at December 1999)

41
M. petraeum has very specialised habitat requirements, often being found at a site in only one or two rock pools when
potentially many more are available.  Disturbances which would likely affect the survival of this species include
pollution, grazing by feral goats, inappropriate drainage caused by using the granitic outcrop as a water catchment area,
and increased nutrients in the water resulting from fertiliser drift.  Monitoring of known populations every 1-2 years is
necessary to document population dynamics during seasonal wet and dry cycles.
References
Hopper 
et al. (1990), Mollemans et al. (1993), Orchard (1985).

42
Prostanthera carrickiana B.J.Conn
LAMIACEAE
Carrick's Mintbush
An erect shrub, 50 cm tall, with densely hairy branches.  Leaves are hairless and elliptical in shape (13-14 x 6-8 mm).
Flowers are 23-26 mm long, pinkish-red, hairless at the base of the corolla but moderately to densely hairy towards the
tip; the inner surface of the corolla is hairless.  There are 2-6 flowers per inflorescence.
This species does not appear to have any close affinities with any other 
Prostanthera species occurring in Western
Australia.
Flowering Period:  April - May
Distribution and Habitat
P. carrickiana is only known from three localities, between Clyde Hill and Mt Burraminya, with a 20 km range.  It
occurs in open mallee with a low shrub understorey in greyish-brown sandy clay soils and in rock crevices.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
#
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Clyde Hill,E 
Esp
Esp
?Private & NR
3.5.83
10
-
2
Clyde Hill,NE 
Esp
Esp
Private
-
10
-
3
Mt Buraminya 
Esp
Esp
VCL
16.6.90
1 000+
Good
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
According to Burgman (1985b), the area near Clyde Hill where populations nos. 1 and 2 of 
P. carrickiana grow are
being developed for agriculture.  Information on the specimens at the Western Australian Herbarium suggests that pop.
no. 1 may occur within the Clyde Hill Nature Reserve.  A survey in May 1993 failed to locate this population.  Surveys
to relocate the populations near Clyde Hill are urgently required.  The Mt Burraminya population is large, in a relatively
remote area and appears quite stable and under no immediate risk (W. Archer, personal communication).
References
Burgman (1985b), Conn (1987), Hopper 
et al. (1990).
                                                          
#
 now Priority 4 (updated at December 1999)

43
Rhizanthella gardneri R.S.Rogers
ORCHIDACEAE
Underground Orchid
A succulent saprophytic herb with thick horizontal subterranean stems.  The tulip-like flower heads develop just under
the soil surface.  Each head contains 20-90 small flowers (6 x 5 mm) surrounded by 6 to 12 large, cream or red-cream,
spreading bracts (10-30 x 5-10 mm) that cracks open the soil surface as the head matures.  Occasionally the tips of the
floral bracts protrude through the leaf litter, leaving a tiny opening.
Flowering Period:  May - July
Distribution and Habitat
Rhizanthella gardneri is known from two widely separated areas, in the Esperance District it occurs in the Munglinup-
Oldfield River District; the other area lies between Corrigin and Wubin in the central Wheatbelt.  A few plants are also
known in New South Wales and there have been reports of 
R. gardneri being found in South Australia.  In Western
Australia it grows in association with 
Melaleuca uncinata, which often forms dense thickets.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Babakin Nar
BR
NR
1982
110
-
2
Sorenson's Res. 
Nar
BR
NR
1982
6
-
3
Dallinup Esp
Rav
Private
1982
10
-
4
Cheadanup Esp
Rav
NR.
1982
4
-
5
Oldfield River 
Esp
Rav
VCL
1982
4
-
6
Corrigin,W Nar
Cor
Unvested 
Res.
1982
50-60
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A comprehensive report on the biology, distribution and management of 
R. gardneri was prepared by Kingsley Dixon
and John Pate (1984) following extensive surveys during 1981-82.  They indicate that management of the orchid
requires successful management of the whole vegetational system which supports the 
Melaleuca uncinata thickets in
which 
R. gardneri is known or suspected to reside.  In the Esperance District, firebreaks need to be well maintained
around populations to prevent burns escaping from adjoining farmland.  The impact of rabbits appears to be negligible
at present, but monitoring is required.  A nature reserve has been proposed to incorporate the Oldfield River population
(no. 5); this proposal requires further action.  A recent report has been prepared on the population genetics and life
history of this species (Carstairs and Coates 1994).
References
Carstairs and Coates (1994), Dixon and Pate (1984), Hargreaves (1993), Hoffman and Brown (1992), Hopper 
et al.
(1990), Leigh and Briggs (1992).

44
Ricinocarpos trichophorus Muell.Arg.
EUPHORBIACEAE
Barrens Wedding Bush
An erect, openly spreading shrub to 0.6 m tall, with stems covered in grey felt-like hairs.  The narrow leaves (25-80 x
1.5 mm) lack stalks, are dark green above and greyish felt-like below, and have margins rolled back toward the midrib
(revolute).  Flowers are white and unisexual; the females have 3 divided styles while the males have numerous stamens
which are joined at the base to form a central column.  The flowers are borne on long, pinkish-brown stalks (up to 20
mm), with 6-10 flowers at the end of each branch.  Fruits are about 10 mm long, grey, hairy and surrounded by the
persistent sepals; they split into 3 slits to release the dark, glossy seeds.
Flowering Period:  March - May, August - November
Distribution and Habitat
Ricinocarpos trichophorus is a common but localised component of post-fire regeneration of mallee scrublands.  It
prefers rocky, sandy clay sites along watercourses or areas which collect run-off, such as granite rocks or breakaways.
Associated species include 
Eucalyptus lehmannii, E. tetragona, Melaleuca uncinata, Glischrocaryon aureum and
Allocasuarina spp.
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Twertup Alb
Jer
NP
17.3.93
3
Healthy
1b
Twertup,E
Alb
Jer
NP
7.12.93
20
Healthy
1c
Fitzgerald Valley
Alb
Jer
NP
24.5.85
Dense
Healthy
2
Mt Heywood 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
1 000+
Post-fire
3
Mt Beaumont 
Esp
Esp
VCL
8.83
Few
-
Response to Disturbance
Two years after a hot burn (January 1991), 
R. trichophorus was abundant and flowering on Mt Heywood, having
regenerated largely by root suckers.  According to K.R. Newbey (unpublished data), plants growing from seed have their
first seed set after 4 years.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Resurvey of the Mt Beaumont population is required following the burn in 1991.
References
Hopper 
et al. (1990), Robinson and Coates (1995), Rye and Hopper (1981).

45
Presumed Extinct Taxa
Opercularia acolytantha Diels
RUBIACEAE
A plant, 8-10 cm tall, with hairless stems.  Lower leaves are minute while the upper ones are linear or slightly broader
between the middle and tip of the leaf (10-15 x 1-3 mm), acute and scarcely rough to touch (scabrous).  Inflorescence
stalks are long and recurve towards the globular flower head.  Flowers are separate from one another; calyx tubes are 2.5
mm long.  Seeds (1.5-2 mm) are 3-sided with lateral appendages.
Opercularia acolytantha is similar to O. vaginata except for the calyx tubes which are all joined together in the latter
species, and free from each other in the former.
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
O. acolytantha was originally collected near Esperance Bay, and according to Diels and Pritzel (1905) "appeared to us
as being [a] genuine sand plant.  We saw [it] settled on the most loose soil."
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora - Presumed Extinct
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Esperance Bay 
Esp
Esp
-
1901
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Summary and Recommendations
There is no known specimen of 
O. acolytantha.  Herbaria that have been searched include those in Australia, Britain and
Berlin.  The type specimen was collected by Diels and probably lodged in Berlin where many specimens were destroyed
during World War II.  Duplicates of Diels collections are widely distributed and another specimen may eventually turn
up elsewhere.
References
Diels and Pritzel (1905), Grieve and Blackall (1982).

46
Taraxacum cygnorum Hand.-Mazz.
ASTERACEAE
Dandelion
A somewhat slender plant, up to 15 cm tall, which is possibly a short-lived perennial.  Roots are simple or few-headed;
the neck being somewhat scaly with fragments of old leaves, and moderately long-hairy.  Leaves are erect (apparently),
hairless, almost membranous, broad-lanceolate (5-25 mm wide), somewhat obtuse, long-attenuate below, and lightly
toothed.  There are 1-4 floral stalks (scapes) which are sub-erect, slender, loosely woolly when young, but eventually
hairless, and longer than the leaves when flowering.  Flower heads are rather small (to 20 mm); involucral bracts are
grey-green, not horned, with about 9 each in the inner and outer series.  Sulphureous flowers are a little longer than the
involucrum; achenes are large (7 mm), up to 40, cylindrical, dark purple, densely covered with wide, thick warty
protuberances; the rostrum is straight, slender and equal in length to the achene; the pappus (5-6 mm) is white.
Flowering Period:  Late winter
Distribution and Habitat
Taraxacum cygnorum was originally collected in the south-west of Australia between Swan River and Cape Riche.
Another specimen, lodged in the Melbourne Herbarium, was collected from Israelite Bay. 
Conservation Status
Current:  Declared Rare Flora - Presumed Extinct
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Israelite Bay 
Esp
Esp
NR
-
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Recent studies by Neville Scarlett (N. Marchant, personal communication) suggest that 
T. cygnorum is naturally
occurring in Victoria and Bass Strait Islands where it grows in undisturbed coastal dunes in calcareous sand.  N. Lander
(personal communication) has viewed both the Victorian specimens and an isosyntype of 
T. cygnorum held at Geneva,
and believed them to be separate taxa.
One specimen collected in the north of the state (W. Archer, personal communication) cannot be accurately determined
until the type specimen has been inspected.  The characters that distinguish this taxon from other 
Taraxacum appear
difficult to define (G. Perry, personal communication).  Further taxonomic work is required.
In April 1993, a survey at Israelite Bay failed to locate 
T. cygnorum
References
Handel-Mazzetti (1907).
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