Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District


PART THREE:  PRIORITY FLORA IN THE ESPERANCE DISTRICT



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PART THREE:  PRIORITY FLORA IN THE ESPERANCE DISTRICT
The taxa treated in this section are those listed (P1, P2, and P3) on CALM's Priority Flora List (28 October 1992) for
the Esperance District.  The priority categories are outlined in section 1.4.  The treatments follow the format in Part 2
but generally do not include detailed recommendations for management and research actions. 
Priority One, Two and Three taxa require further surveys to determine their conservation status as they do not meet the
survey requirements for gazettal as Declared Rare Flora.  They may be added to the Schedule of Declared Rare Flora if
they prove to be truly rare, in danger of extinction or deemed to be threatened and in need of special protection.  Where
possible, populations of these taxa, particularly those listed as Priority One and Two, should be protected from damage
or destruction. 
Priority Four taxa have been adequately surveyed and have not been further treated in this document.  They are usually
represented on conservation reserves and are not presently threatened or in need of special protection.  Their status may
change if present circumstances alter (e.g. land clearing, introduction or spread of 
Phytophthora dieback disease) and
they may go onto (or back onto) the Schedule of Declared Rare Flora.  These species should be monitored during
routine operations.
Descriptions of species were compiled by consulting references and from discussion with botanists.  Distribution and
habitat were recorded from Departmental Rare Flora files.  The list of known populations generally refers to those in the
Esperance District although there may be some populations listed which occur outside the District.  Herbarium records
may indicate a wider range and larger numbers of populations, some of which are known to have been destroyed since
the time of collection.

64
A.   Priority One Taxa
Based on the October 1992 Priority Flora List there are 75 Priority One taxa known from within the boundaries of the
Esperance District.  Of these, 37 taxa were located during surveys in 1992 and 1993.  New populations or sub-
populations were found for 26 taxa. 
The following taxa are not included, as current information indicates that they are not distributed in the Esperance
District:
Acacia rhamphophylla ms
Bossiaea strigillosa
Dryandra sp. 36 (A.S.George 16721)
Frankenia bracteata
Guichenotia apetala
Haloragis scoparia
Lachnostachys ferruginea var. paniculata forma paniculata
Microcorys pimeleoides
Microcorys wilsoniana
Pterostylis turfosa
Spyridium sp. Ravensthorpe (E.M.Bennett s.n.) = S. glaucum ms
The following taxa have been deleted as they were found to be another taxon:
Acacia sp. Hatter Hill (K.R.Newbey 9681) 

Acacia singula
Eucalyptus sp. F (K.R.Newbey 9772)

Eucalyptus litorea
Eremophila sp. Mt Heywood (K.R.Newbey 8180)

Eremophila biserrata
Leucopogon sp. Dundas (M.A.Burgman 1482)

Leucopogon sp. Roberts Swamp (K.R.Newbey 8173)
Leucopogon sp. Peak Charles (M.A.Burgman 1476)

Leucopogon sp. Bonnie Hill (K.R.Newbey 9831)
Pultenaea sp. Clyde Hill (K.R.Newbey 8236)

Pultenaea elachista
Pultenaea sp. Sheoak Hill (K.R.Newbey 8003a)

Pultenaea conferta
Pultenaea sp. Sparkle Hill (K.R.Newbey 2690)

Pultenaea neurocalyx
The following taxa were renamed during the project:
Acacia sp. Niblick Hill (K.R.Newbey 9726)

Acacia diaphana ms
Aotus sp. Dundas (M.A.Burgman 3835) 

Pultenaea sp. Fitzgerald River (M.A.Burgman 3835)

Otion rigidum ms
Diuris sp. Gibson (A.P.Brown 243)

Diuris concinna
Eucalyptus sp. Beaumont (M.A.Burgman 3135)

Eucalyptus burgmaniana ms
Eucalyptus sp. Jimberlana Hill (A.Taylor s.n. 13.11.87)

Eucalyptus jimberlanica
Eucalyptus sp. Pyramid Lake (M.I.H.Brooker 9526) 

Eucalyptus delicata ms

65
Gratiola sp. Cape Arid (G.J.Keighery s.n.)

Gratiola pedunculata
Latrobea sp. Hatter Hill (K.R.Newbey 6532)

Pultenaea sp. Hatter Hill (K.R.Newbey 6532)

Eutaxia sp. Hatter Hill (K.R.Newbey 6532)
Leucopogon sp. Cascades (M.A.Burgman 3700) [aff. hamulosus]

Leucopogon sp. Mt Heywood (M.A.Burgman 1211)
Spyridium sp. Mt Beaumont (K.R.Newbey 6718)

Spyridium minutum ms
Stachystemon sp. Mt Beaumont (K.R.Newbey 9773)

Stachystemon sp. Mt Baring (K.R.Newbey 9773)

66
Acacia diaphana R.S.Cowan & Maslin ms
MIMOSACEAE
A bushy, spreading shrub to 3 m tall, with branches dividing near ground level into 3-4 main stems.  Branches are
smooth, dull greyish-brown; new growth is angular with resinous margins and a white powdery ('pruinose') surface.
Phyllodes ('leaves') are narrow and slightly elliptical (30-70 x 2.5-4 mm), flexible, one central nerve, strongly resinous
along the margin (often in obvious droplets) and bright lightish green in colour.  Flower heads are globular, golden, with
2-3 borne on a main axis in the axils of phyllodes.
Flowering Period:  September
Distribution and Habitat
Acacia diaphana ms is distributed between Niblick Hill and Mt Coobaninya, with a range of about 50 km.  It occurs in
sandy loam and mottled clay in small, freshwater depressions.  It grows in low open woodland in association with
Eucalyptus occidentalis, A. cyclops and Lepidosperma leptophyllum.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Buraminya,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
6.5.81
Rare
-
2
Clyde Hill,N 
Esp
Esp
?Private
19.9.84
-
-
3
Niblick Hill,W 
Esp
Esp
Private
24.2.83
Common
-
4
Mt Willgonarinya,W 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.9.90
-
-
5
Mt Buraminya,E 
Esp
Esp
VCL
15.9.90
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A. diaphana ms is poorly known and possibly rare and vulnerable.  The two most southern populations occur in
agricultural areas and are threatened by clearing.  In 1983, the population near Niblick Hill (no. 3) was not fenced from
stock (Newbey 1983).  Resurvey of all populations is required.
References
Newbey (1983).

67
Acacia diminuta Maslin ms
MIMOSACEAE
An intricately branched, spreading shrub, 15-20 cm tall.  Phyllodes ('leaves') are hairless, linear to oblong (3-5 x 1 mm),
with a slightly upturned, sharp spiny tip; a gland may be present on the upper margin near the middle of the phyllode.
Flower heads are globular and cream to yellow in colour.  Legumes (20 x 4-5 mm) are slightly constricted between the
seeds.
Flowering Period:  October - November
Distribution and Habitat
Acacia diminuta ms is known from a few scattered localities between Jerramungup and Scaddan, over a range of 200
km.  It grows in sandy clay soils in shrub mallee. 
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Ravensthorpe,WNW Alb
Rav
-
30.10.65
-
-
2
Scaddan,N Esp
Esp
-
2.11.68
-
-
3
Esperance,W Esp
Esp
NR
10.84
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A. diminuta ms is poorly known and possibly rare and endangered.  Access to the population in Nature Reserve No.
30583 is through dense scrub thicket; resurvey (with access requested via the adjoining landowner) is required.  Surveys
in the Scaddan area in 1992 failed to locate population no. 2.  Further survey is required.

68
Acacia dorsenna Maslin
MIMOSACEAE
A dense, rounded shrub, 1.5 m tall and 3 m broad.  The bark is smooth, light grey with the extremities of young
branches being light brownish to yellowish-green.  Phyllodes ('leaves') are asymmetrically elliptical in shape and have a
small, spiny tip.  A small gland is present on the upper margin near the base of the phyllode.  Foliage is dull green and
turns very slightly shiny with age.  The globular flower heads are large (about 9 mm diam.) and bright, mid-golden in
colour.  Legumes are narrowly oblong (60 x 11 mm) and conspicuously rounded over the seeds.
Acacia dorsenna may be mistaken for A. merrallii or a large phyllode form of A. camptoclada.  A. dorsenna is
distinguished by its larger phyllodes, which do not have a stiff, sharp point, and the gland is close to the base; legumes
are straight and larger.
Flowering Period:  August - September
Distribution and Habitat
A. dorsenna is known only from a restricted area (less than 20 km) north of Norseman where it grows on low rocky hills.
Soils are reddish sandy loams with limestone.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Thirsty,N 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
20.11.92
50-100
Part-dist.
2
Norseman,N 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
27.9.69
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A. dorsenna appears to be extremely rare.  The only known populations are on Main Road Reserves, which are partially
disturbed.  In 1992, a survey for 
A. dorsenna led to the location of the population north of Norseman (no. 2).  Further
survey is urgently required to determine the conservation status of this species.

69
Acacia mutabilis subsp. incurva Maslin ms
MIMOSACEAE
A shrub or small tree, 1.6-2 m tall.  Phyllodes ('leaves') are linear-oblanceolate (30-55 x 3-4 mm), slightly incurved, and
acute and finely pointed at the tip.  A gland is situated 1-5 mm from the base.  Narrow appendages at the base of the
phyllodes (stipules, 2 mm) are occasionally persistent.  The golden flower heads are globular, 16-32 flowered with
generally 2 heads borne per cluster (raceme) on a stalk (3-6 mm).  Legumes are black, almost cylindrical (70 x 2-3 mm),
barely constricted between the seeds, and curved to once coiled. 
Flowering Period:  August - September
Distribution and Habitat
Acacia mutabilis subsp. incurva ms is known from two areas, over 220 km apart, near the Young River and between
Ongerup and Pingrup.  It grows on slightly undulating plain in sand or sandy loam, in very open shrub mallee and dense
heath.  Associated species include 
Eucalyptus transcontinentalis, E. stoatei and Melaleuca subtrigona.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1*
West Point Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res. & VCL
11.9.92
Common
Healthy
2
Ongerup,E Alb
Gno
-
22.9.73
-
-
3
Ongerup,NW Alb
Gno
-
9.12.62
-
-
4
Pingrup,SE Kat
Kent
-
-
-
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
A. mutabilis subsp. incurva ms is poorly known.  A recent survey has significantly extended the known range of this
taxon.  Further survey in the upper reaches of the Young River is required.

70
Acacia sp. Esperance (M.A.Burgman 1833b)
MIMOSACEAE
A shrub, less than 50 cm tall.  Young branches are covered in short, felt-like hairs which are pressed close to the stem.
Phyllodes ('leaves') are cylindrical (terete, 90-130 x 1.5 mm), thick, curve inwards and have a sharp spine at the tip.  The
globular flower heads are small (3 mm diam.), 10-flowered and borne singly on short stalks (2 mm) in phyllode axils.
Flowering Period:  August
Distribution and Habitat
This taxa is known from only one collection.  The plant occurs in very open shrub mallee and mid-dense shrub (less than
0.5 m tall), in reddish sand and clay in a depression near a clay pan.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop. Land
Last
No. 
of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Clyde Hill,NNW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
7.8.83
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
Acacia sp. Esperance is very poorly known and possibly rare.  The known location is remote but may be threatened by
clearing for agriculture.  Further survey is required.
References
Burgman (1985b).

71
Allocasuarina globosa L.A.S.Johnson
CASUARINACEAE
A shrub, 1.5 to 3.5 m tall, with separate male and female plants.  The joints of the branches (articles, 17-28 x 1 mm) are
smooth and have short hairs in the furrows.  There are 10-12 short teeth (0.6-1.0 mm) at the end of each joint.  The
cones are subglobose in shape (15-17 x 13-15 mm) and attached directly to the branch.  Markings on the cones are
arranged in squares.  Immediately below the calyx of the flower there are 2 small bracteoles which have an obtuse apex
divided into 3 pyramidal bodies that are separated by a tiny, sharp point.
Allocasuarina globosa differs from A. scleroclada by having shorter teeth, slender articles and divided bracteoles.  It
can be distinguished from 
A. campestris and A. tesselata by having longer articles, shorter cones, and the form of the
divided bracteoles on the cone.
Flowering Period:  Unknown
Distribution and Habitat
A. globosa is known from only two populations, both on hilltops of basaltic rock, which are 120 km apart.  At Mt Deans
this species forms the dominant shrubland species, while at Mt Day other 
AllocasuarinasA. campestris and A. helmsii,
are present.  The mallee 
Eucalyptus oleosa var. oleosa occurs at both sites.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Day 
Esp
Dund
VCL
25.10.64
-
-
2
Mt Deans 
Esp
Dund
Timber Res. 
27.11.91
1 200
Good
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
A. globosa has very specific habitat requirements and is possibly threatened by mining activities.  At Mt Deans, although
there is no current mining activity, the area is heavily pegged.  Resurvey to locate the Mt Day population, and further
survey of the Bremer Range is required.
References
Beard (1969), Wilson and Johnson (1989).

72
Baeckea crassifolia var. icosandra F.Muell. ex Benth. 
MYRTACEAE
A straggly to dense, wide-spreading shrub to 1 m tall and 1 m wide.  Leaves are shiny, thick, triquetrous, oblong (2-3
mm) and obtuse at the tip.  Flowers are small with pale mauve petals.  The calyx is finely honeycombed.  Bracteoles are
rarely seen as they fall off early.  The ovary is 3-celled with 2 ovules per cell.  The 15-20 stamens are in a single row,
separate, with longer ones occurring opposite the petals; the filaments are slender and cylindrical.
Flowering Period:  May, August - October
Distribution and Habitat
Baeckea crassifolia var. icosandra is distributed from near Truslove to Israelite Bay, a range of 200 km.  It grows in
white sand in open woodland and shrub communities, associated with 
Banksia media, Grevillea aneura and
Conostephium drummondii.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Ney,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
20+
Good
2*
Mt Ridley,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
5+
Good
3
Clyde Hill,NNW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
4.5.83
-
-
4a
Mt Ney,SW 
Esp
Esp
NR
-
-
-
4b
Kau Rock Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
20.9.85
-
-
5
Wittenoom Hills,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
17.9.70
-
-
6
Wittenoom Hills 
Esp
Esp
NR
9.6.72
-
-
7
Kau Rock,SE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
5.9.84
-
-
8
Mt Ridley,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
14.9.91
5+
-
9
Israelite Bay 
Esp
Esp
NR
9.02
-
-
10
Scaddan Esp
Esp
-
9.92
-
-
11
Truslove Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
16.8.82
-
-
12
Salmon Gums,W 
Esp
Esp
-
10.3.80
Rare
-
13
Oldfield River 
Esp
Rav
-
12.40
-
-
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Baeckea crassifolia var. icosandra is known to occur in three Nature Reserves.  It is also common between Mt Ridley
and Mt Buraminya (W. Archer, personal communication), an area of Crown Land which is not currently threatened by
clearing for agriculture.  The genus is currently under taxonomic revision (M. Trudgen, personal communication).
References
Blackall and Grieve (1980).

73
Caladenia tentaculata Schltdl.
ORCHIDACEAE
Green-comb Spider Orchid, Fringed Spider Orchid
An orchid, 25-35 cm tall.  Leaves are narrow (80-120 x 6-12 mm) and hairy.  Flowers are large (60-80 x 50-60 mm),
spider-like, with 1 or 2 per plant.
Caladenia tentaculata differs from other members of the C. dilatata complex in its green and white flowers, hanging
(tentacle-like) rather than upcurved sepals and extremely long-fringed labellum (the modified lower petal which is often
referred to as the lip or tongue).
Flowering Period:  September - October
Distribution and Habitat
C. tentaculata is known from a few widely scattered localities, over 200 km apart, from near Jerramungup to the
Cascades area.  It grows in mallee woodland adjacent to seasonal creeks.  
This species is also found in South Australia and Victoria, where it is common in forest, woodland or rough scrub.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Lort River 
Esp
Esp
VCL
31.8.78
2
-
1993
Not found
-
2
Young River 
Esp
Rav
-
1993
3
-
3
Jerramungup Alb
Jer
?Private
20.9.78
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
C. tentaculata is considered rare by Hoffman and Brown (1992), and although it closely resembles species found in the
eastern States, more taxonomic work is required to determine whether the western form is, in fact, the same species (A.
Brown, personal communication).
Surveys by A. Brown (personal communication) have failed to relocate any plants at the Lort River locality (pop. no. 1).
In Western Australia, this taxon is not known to occur in any conservation reserve.  Further survey is required.
References
Bates and Weber (1990), Hoffman and Brown (1992).

74
Chorizema circinale J.M.Taylor & Crisp
PAPILIONACEAE
A small shrub, about 30 cm tall, arising from a thick, woody rootstock.  Stems and branches are wiry, weak, and covered
with short, pale hairs.  Leaves are often sparse, oblong-shaped (4-12 x 2-4 mm) with margins that are curved back
strongly towards the midrib (revolute).  The tip of the leaf is rolled backwards, like a coil (circinate), and has a fine,
sharp point; the upper surface of the leaf shows conspicuous veins and is almost hairless, while the under side is covered
with dense, persistent hairs.  The broad, upright petal (standard, 13 mm x 13 mm) and wings of the flowers are dull
yellow with orange-red markings, whereas the keel is yellow or greenish.  The calyx (7-9 mm) is covered with dense,
grey or white hairs; the 2 upper lobes are united.  The pod (11 x 5 mm) is usually nodding, has a pointed tip, and is
covered with soft hairs.
Chorizema circinale superficially resembles C. cytisoides, C. obtusifolium, C. ulotropis and C. uncinatum, which all
have narrow leaves with a conspicuous network of veins and margins that curve backwards.  
C. cytisoides and
C. obtusifolium can be distinguished by their leaves which are more than 12 mm long; C. ulotropis has linear leaves,
about 1 mm wide; and 
C. uncinatum has hooked leaves which rarely curve backwards strongly and are never coiled; it
also has more numerous flowers.

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