Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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Flowering PeriodSeptember
Distribution and Habitat
C. circinale is known from only two localities, one, 50 km WNW of Grasspatch and the other, 70 km to the north-west,
near Ninety Mile Tank.  It grows on yellow sand or sandy clay loam in an almost flat or undulating landscape.
Associated vegetation is usually heath which may include 
Grevillea excelsior, G. aneura, Banksia elderiana,
Allocasuarina campestris, Verticordia spp. and Melaleuca spp.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Fields Road 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
19.9.93
50-100
Part-dist.
& VCL
30% Grazed
2
Ninety Mile 
Esp
Dund
VCL
16.12.79
-
-
Tank,W
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
C. circinale appears to be extremely rare.  The Fields Road population (no. 1) is immediately adjacent to a gravel pit
and is threatened by further extension of the pit.  Apparently this area was burned in 1983, prior to being cleared and
ripped (Taylor and Crisp 1992).  About 30% of the plants have been grazed (1993 survey), possibly by rabbits.  Liaison
with the Esperance Shire is urgently required to prevent further disturbance of the population.  Further survey is urgently
required to accurately assess the conservation status of this species.
References
Burgman (1985b), Taylor and Crisp (1992).

75
Chorizema nervosum T.Moore
PAPILIONACEAE
An openly branching shrub, 30-70 cm tall, with numerous branches from the base that are covered in short hairs.  Leaves
are nearly round (7-14 x 8-14 mm) with a conspicuous network of veins, have a long sharp point and curve slightly
backwards at the tip; the margins are crinkled.  Flowers are borne in terminal or axillary racemes (4-12 cm) with 5-10
flowers on stalks (3-4 mm).  The calyx (3.5-5 mm) is scattered with short hairs and the upper 2 lobes are united into a
broad lip with 1 mm free.  The corolla has a large, yellow-orange upright petal (standard, 6-9 x 8-11 mm), yellow-
orange wings and an orange-red keel that is much shorter than the wings.
The pod is nodding, ovoid (8-12 x 4-6 mm) and acute at the tip. 
Flowering Period:  July - September
Distribution and Habitat
Chorizema nervosum is distributed over a range of nearly 350 km, from near Bremer Bay to Cape Arid, and extends
inland to near Jerramungup, Mt Ney and Mt Ragged.  It is found in numerous habitats, including sand, sandy clay, and
on rocky slopes and gullies.  Associated vegetation may be shrubland, coastal heath or low mallee-heath.  
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Cheadanup Esp
Rav
NR
10.84
-
-
2
Mt Burdett,SSE 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Verge
25.9.92
1
Average
3
Mt Ney 
Esp
Esp
NR
4.8.83
-
-
4
Thomas River 
Esp
Esp
-
7.38
-
-
5
Quoin Head,NE 
Alb
Rav
NP
16.7.71
-
-
6*
Parmango Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
14.11.93
5
Good
7*
Pt Malcolm Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
20.4.93
30+
Good
8*
Sheoaks Hill,NW 
Esp
Esp
NP
22.4.93
100+
Good
9*
Gora Rd 
Esp
Esp
NP
22.4.93
500+
Post-fire
10a*
Mt Ragged 
Esp
Esp
NP
23.4.93
40+
Post-fire
10b*
Mt Ragged
Esp
Esp
NP
23.4.93
100+
Post-fire
10c
Mt Ragged
Esp
Esp
NP
23.4.93
50+
Post-fire
11*
Balladonia Rd 
Esp
Esp
NP
24.4.93
1
Average
12*
Young River,W 
Esp
Esp
?VCL
9.9.93
20+
Good
13*
Fence Rd 
Alb
Rav
Shire Rd Verge
8.9.93
4
Disturbed
14*
Loc. 1040
Alb
Rav
VCL
11.8.93
500+
Good
15
Eyre Range 
Alb
Rav
NP
2.11.65
-
-
16
Fitzgerald Alb
Rav
-
23.8.63
-
-
17
Gairdner River 
Alb
Jer
-
27.6.60
-
-
18
Bremer Bay,NW 
Alb
Jer
-
8.7.67
-
-
19
Cape Arid 
Esp
Esp
NP
1875
-
-
* = new population

76
Response to Disturbance
Numerous seedlings were found growing 26 months after a hot fire (February 1991) in the Mt Ragged area; the majority
of these plants had not yet flowered or set seed.  One of the largest and most vigorous populations was found south-west
of Ravensthorpe (pop. no. 14) which has had no known disturbance for at least 30 years; the last fire was in the mid
1960s.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Recent surveys have found 
C. nervosum to be widespread and well represented in five conservation reserves.
References
Taylor and Crisp (1992).

77
Coleanthera coelophylla (A.Cunn.) Benth.
EPACRIDACEAE
An erect, bushy shrub, 30-60 cm tall.  Young branches, leaves and leaf margins are covered with soft hairs.  Leaves are
ovate to lanceolate (14 x 5 mm) and strongly striate below.  White to deep pink flowers are borne singly or rarely in
pairs in the leaf axils.  The calyx has long hairs around the margins.  Corolla lobes are rolled back and bearded inside.
The anthers are completely exerted from the corolla tube and joined together at the base to form a purple-red cone
around the style.
Flowering Period:  May, November
Distribution and Habitat
Coleanthera coelophylla is known only from the Borden-Nyabing area where collections were made more than 60 years
ago, and from near Gibson from a 1901 collection.  It grows in gravelly sand in heath communities.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Albany,E
?Alb
?Alb
-
1800s
-
-
2
Borden Alb
Gno
-
10.28
-
-
3
Nyabing Kat
Kent
-
-
-
-
4
Gibson's Soak 
Esp
Esp
-
4.11.01
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
C. coelophylla is very poorly known and possibly rare.  It has not been collected for over 60 years and further survey is
urgently required.
References
Blackall and Grieve (1981).

78
Conostephium marchantiorum Strid
EPACRIDACEAE
A much-branched, erect shrub, 0.6 to 1.2 m tall.  Leaves are narrowly oblong-linear (7-11 x 1-2 mm) and crowded
towards the tips of the branchlets.  Both leaves and branchlets are sparsely to moderately covered in short, soft hairs.
Leaf margins are rolled backwards towards the midrib (revolute), and leaf tips have a short, sharp point.  Flowers are
about 10 mm long, solitary and usually hang downwards from the leaf axils.  Sepals resemble the bracteoles which are
densely silky-hairy on the outer surface.  The lower half of the corolla is yellowish, while the upper section is deep
reddish-purple.
Conostephium marchantiorum is closely allied to C. minus and C. uncinatum.  The latter species also occurs north of
Esperance; it has more tightly rolled leaves than 
C. marchantiorum, as well as a leaf apex which bends downwards,
which is not present in either 
C. marchantiorum or C. minus.  C. minus only occurs in the Perth-Gingin area.
Flowering Period:  November - December
Distribution and Habitat
C. marchantiorum is distributed over an area of 65 km, from south of Peak Eleanora to near Dalyup and eastwards to
Scaddan.  It grows in grey or light yellow sandy soil, in open mallee and shrub heath communities.  Associated species
include 
Eucalyptus tetragona, E. angulosa, Banksia media, Hakea sp. and Melaleuca spp. 
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Truslove Esp
Esp
NR
17.11.92
12+
Good
2a
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
500+
Good
2b
Fields Rd
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
20+
Good
3
Grass Patch,S 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
17.11.92
10+
Good
4
Scaddan,S 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
14.3.83
-
-
20.11.92
Not found
-
5
Scaddan,NNW 
Esp
Esp
?MRWA Rd Res.
6.9.86
Frequent
-
& ?NR
6
Coolbidge Ck 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
23.6.90
Common
-
7*
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
2
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown

79
Summary and Recommendations
C. marchantiorum is found in a relatively large population (no. 2) on Crown Land which is not threatened by clearing
for agriculture at present.  It also occurs in at least one and possibly two localities in the Truslove Nature Reserve (pop.
nos. 1 and 5) where it should remain secure.  In 1992, a survey south of Scaddan failed to relocate population no. 4; the
clayey soil typical of the given locality, was inconsistent with the known preferred habitat of 
C. marchantiorum.  Further
survey is required.
References
Strid (1986), van der Moezel (1987).

80
Conostephium uncinatum Moezel
EPACRIDACEAE
An erect shrub to 1.5 m tall, with branchlets densely covered in silky, straight hairs.  Leaves are narrowly oblong-linear
(3-5 x 0.5 mm), tightly rolled backwards towards the midrib (revolute), and clustered into several groups at the ends of
branches.  The leaf apex has a distinctive brittle, brown point that bends sharply downwards (deflexed).  Flowers are
about 10 mm long and solitary in the upper leaf axils.  The bracteoles are covered in silky hairs, and are nearly as long
as the calyx.  The upper half of the corolla is silky-hairy, while the lower half is without hairs.
Conostephium uncinatum is closely related to C. marchantiorum and C. minus.  It differs from the latter two species by
having a deflexed leaf apex, shorter floral parts, and shorter, more tightly rolled leaves.  
C. marchantiorum occurs in the
same region as 
C. uncinatum, however C. minus only grows in the Perth-Gingin area.
Flowering Period:  November - December
Distribution and Habitat
C. uncinatum is distributed over an area of about 100 km, between Grass Patch and Clyde Hill.  It typically grows in
yellow or brown loamy sand or white sand near saline depressions.  Associated plants include tall 
Melaleuca shrubs,
open tree mallee of 
Eucalyptus incrassata and E. angulosa, and open low shrubs including Darwinia luehmannii.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Mt Heywood,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
200+
Good
1b*
Mt Heywood,NE
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
4
Good
2
Clyde Hill 
Esp
Esp
?NR
19.3.93
-
Not found
3
Grasspatch,E Esp
Esp
?
18.10.82
-
-
4a
Mt Heywood,NNE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
10
Good
4b*
Mt Heywood,NNE
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
2
Good
4c
Mt Heywood,NNE
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
50+
Good
4d*
Mt Heywood,NNE
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
3+
Good
5
Mt Beaumont 
Esp
Esp
?VCL
31.12.83
-
-
6a*
Mt Heywood,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
50+
Good
6b*
Mt Heywood,NE
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
200+
Good
* = new population / sub-population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The majority of known populations occur in Vacant Crown Land north of Mt Heywood and Mt Beaumont.  This region
is interspersed with numerous saline lakes and depressions where this species is likely to exist.  The area is not
threatened by clearing for agriculture at present.  Further survey is required.
References
Burgman (1985b), van der Moezel (1987).

81
Dampiera sericantha F.Muell. ex Benth.
GOODENIACEAE
A slender, weak perennial herb, 10-30 cm tall, which lacks hairs except for the flowers.  The stems have blunt angles.
The oblong to elliptical-shaped leaves (2-9 x 1.5-3 mm) lack stalks, are thick, obtuse at the tip, and may be entire or
toothed along the margins.  Flowering branches (to 25 mm) bear 1 to 3 flowers; bracteoles (3 mm) occur immediately
beneath the flowers.  Flowers are blue to pale blue; the corolla (9-11 mm) has fine silvery-grey hairs on the outside; the
lobes have wings (1-2 mm wide).
Dampiera sericantha is similar to D. parvifolia which has numerous bracteoles beneath the flowers.
Flowering Period:  August - December
Distribution and Habitat
D. sericantha has been found between the Vermin Proof Fence and Cape Le Grand National Park, a distance of 160 km.
It grows on sandplain in heath communities. 
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Munglinup,E 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Verge
9.9.93
20+
Part-dist.
2
VPF Esp
Rav
-
2.11.62
-
-
3
Shark Lake 
Esp
Esp
-
21.5.69
-
-
4
Esperance,W Esp
Esp
-
13.12.60
-
-
5
Gibson,NW Esp
Esp
-
-
-
-
6
Lucky Bay 
Esp
Esp
NP
1800s
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Appears to be a disturbance opportunist.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Plants recently surveyed east of Munglinup (pop. no. 1) were most frequent along the Telecom line where disturbance
had created a more open habitat.  It is an inconspicuous shrub and its broad distribution suggests that more populations
may exist.  Further survey is required.  
References
Bentham (1869), Rajput and Carolin (1992).

82
Darwinia calothamnoides N.G.Marchant ms
MYRTACEAE
A straggly shrub, to 1.5 m tall and 0.8 m wide, with pale cream-grey branches.  Leaves are crowded towards the branch
ends, narrow-linear (about 12 mm x 0.7 mm), almost triquetrous, have numerous oil glands on the lower surface; older
leaves drop off leaving prominent leaf scars.
Flowering Period:  April - May
Distribution and Habitat
Darwinia calothamnoides ms is known only from Mt Heywood, where it grows in rock crevices and on nearby
sandplain.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Mt Heywood 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
6
-
1b
Mt Heywood,NW
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
1 000+ Seedl.
Post-fire
Response to Disturbance
A fire burnt the Mt Heywood area in January 1991.  More than one thousand seedlings and resuckers of
D. calothamnoides ms were observed in burnt sandplain at the north-west base of Mt Heywood.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Post-fire monitoring of the population and further survey are required.

83
Darwinia sp. Mt Baring (K.R.Newbey 9775)
MYRTACEAE
A shrub, 30-50 cm tall and 30-35 cm wide.  Leaves are smooth, obovate (3 x 1.3 mm), thick, upper surface slightly
convex, lower surface ridged, margins with fine scattered teeth.  Red flower heads (8-10 mm across) occur at the branch
ends and are 6-8 flowered, pendant and numerous.  Flowers lack hairs; outer bracts are slightly obovate (6 x 5 mm) and
slightly cupped; calyx is obconical (2.7 x 2.3 mm), 5-ridged and smooth; lobes are almost absent; petals are entire (1.4 x
1.4 mm); the style protrudes about 4 mm beyond the petals.
Flowering Period:  March
Distribution and Habitat
Darwinia sp. Mt Baring is known only from two localities, near Mt Baring and in Kau Rock Nature Reserve.  It grows
in white sand in mallee and low shrub communities.  Associated species may include 
Eucalyptus tetraptera,
Phymatocarpus maxwellii, Astartea ambigua and Calothamnus gracilis.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Baring,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
12.10.83
Rare
-
2
Elds Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
29.3.83
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Darwinia sp. Mt Baring is known to occur in the Kau Rock Nature Reserve.  Resurvey of known populations and further
survey are required.
References
Newbey (1983).

84
Darwinia sp. Mt Ney (M.A.Burgman & S.McNee 1274)
MYRTACEAE
A sprawling or erect shrub, 0.3 to 1.0 m tall and up to 1 m wide.  Young branches are cream-coloured.  Leaves are
narrow-linear (5-7 mm), thick, ridged on the lower surface.  Flowers are large (10 mm across), occur at the ends of
branches, have red bracts and a white or cream style turning reddish.
Flowering Period:  April - May, August, October
Distribution and Habitat
This taxon is known only from near Mt Ney and to the north-west near Crystal Lake, a distribution of about 40 km.  It
usually grows on granite in white to reddish sandy clay or in yellow loamy sand, in open to dense scrub, associated with
Eucalyptus tetragona, Hakea and Calothamnus.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Ney,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
7.5.83
-
-
2
Mt Ney
Esp
Esp
NR
1.10.83
-
-
3*
Crystal Lake 
Esp
Esp
VCL
22.5.93
50+
Post-dist.
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
A recent survey extended the known range of this taxon suggesting that it may be more widely distributed than initially
believed.  It occurs within the Mt Ney Nature Reserve where it should remain secure.  Further survey is required.

85
Dicrastylis archeri Munir
CHLOANTHACEAE
An erect, spindly shrub, to 1 m tall.  Stems are covered in greyish, short, soft hairs.  Leaves are opposite, with alternate
pairs at right angles to one another (decussate), narrow-oblong (10-20 x 1-2 mm), obtuse at the tip, wrinkled and hairless
on the upper surface while the under side is covered with soft, greyish hairs; margins are curved backwards towards the
midrib.  Creamy-white flowers are borne in heads (cyme); the terminal flower usually has 4 parts, while the other
flowers in a head are divided into 5 parts.  The slender primary stalks (10-25 mm), flower stalks (1-2.5 mm) and corolla
(2.5-3 mm) are all covered in short, soft hairs.  The stamens (4 or 5) and deeply 2-branched style are extended beyond
the corolla.
Dicrastylis archeri is closely related to D. linearifolia which has larger flowers (5-6 mm), a golden orange or rusty-
coloured stem and leaves that end abruptly in a sharp point.  
D. parvifolia is also similar, and can be distinguished by its
leaves which are covered in soft, greyish hairs on both sides, and smaller flowers (2-2.5 mm).
Flowering Period:  December
Distribution and Habitat
D. archeri is known from only one locality, north-north-east of Mt Heywood.  It grows in deep sand, in an open mallee
and 
Melaleuca shrub community with Banksia media.

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