Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Heywood,NNE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
21.5.93
25
Good
Response to Disturbance
Possibly a disturbance opportunist.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The only known population is on a track which is rarely used.  It may be a disturbance opportunist as no plants were
found in the adjacent undisturbed scrub.  Further survey is required.
References
Munir (1991).

86
Dicrastylis capitellata Munir
CHLOANTHACEAE
A low shrub, 20-25 cm tall, spreading to about 1 m diameter.  Stems are densely covered in greyish, soft downy or
matted hairs.  Leaves are opposite, with alternate pairs at right angles to one another, narrow-linear (5-15 x 1-1.5 mm),
somewhat rough and wrinkled on the upper surface with the underside covered in greyish, soft, matted hairs.  Usually, 7
flowers are arranged in nearly globular-shaped clusters (5-7 mm diam.) which alternate along the horizontal stems.
Flowers (4-4.5 mm) have a 5-lobed calyx which is covered with short, matted hairs on the outside and is hairless inside;
the corolla is light purplish-blue, tubular below and usually 4-lobed, with matted hairs on the outside and long hairs on
the inside.  The stamens (4 or 5) and deeply 2-branched style are extended beyond the corolla.
Dicrastylis capitellata is closely related to D. microphylla which has stems and both sides of the leaves densely covered
with grey, short, matted hairs; flower clusters are very woolly.  
D. nicholasii is also similar, but can be distinguished by
the distinct stalk (15-25 mm) of the flower cluster; whereas the stalks of 
D. capitellata are only up to 3 mm long. 
Flowering Period:  December
Distribution and Habitat
D. capitellata is known over a 15 km range, north-east of Mt Heywood.  This species grows in well-drained, fine yellow
loamy sand in a low-lying, mallee-shrub community, associated with 
Eucalyptus conglobata, Eremophila serpens,
Melaleuca sp. and Gahnia sp.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Mt Heywood,NNE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
1.12.90
-
-
2
Mt Heywood,NNE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
11.12.90
-
-
3a*
Mt Heywood,NNE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
500+
Good
3b*
Mt Heywood,NNE
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.5.93
1 000s
Post-fire
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Twenty-six months after a fire in January 1991, population no. 3b was found flowering and growing prolifically.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
D. capitellata occurs in a remote area which is not threatened by clearing for agriculture at present.  Monitoring of
population no. 3 is required to determine whether this species is a disturbance opportunist.  Further survey is required.
References
Munir (1991).

87
Diuris concinna D.L.Jones
ORCHIDACEAE
Donkey Orchid
An erect, tuberous herb 20-40 cm tall, which lacks hairs.  There are three to five basal, linear leaves (8-13 x 3-4 mm).
The one to five flowers are not crowded, clear bright yellow with red-brown markings on the dorsal sepal and labellum.
The broadly ovate dorsal sepal (8-14 x 5-8.5 mm) projects forwards and embraces the column in the lower half; the
upper margins curve backwards.  The lateral sepals (10-17 x 2.5-3.5 mm) are asymmetrically acute, rolled inwards; the
inner third is green and the other two thirds purplish.  The petals are widely divergent; the lamina is broadly ovate,
bright yellow, and strongly curved backwards; the reddish-brown claw (3-6 mm) widens just near the apex.  The
labellum (10-14 mm) is deeply 3-lobed, yellow with basal red-brown markings; the glandular appendages (calli) of the
labellum consist of two incurved red-brown ridges (5-6 mm).  The column (4 x 2.5 mm) projects forwards from the end
of the ovary; the column wings are white.
Diuris concinna is closely related to D. brevifolia, but it can be distinguished from that species by its much broader
petals, dorsal sepal and mid-lobe of the labellum.  It may be confused with 
D. setacea which flowers only after fires and
has spirally twisted leaves, and 
D. filifolia which has stiffly erect, larger flowers which have a rhomboid mid-lobe on the
labellum and broad, short-curved lateral sepals.
Flowering Period:  October
Distribution and Habitat
The four known populations of 
D. concinna occur to the north and north-east of Esperance about 50 km apart.  A
disjunct population occurs 200 km to the west in the Fitzgerald River National Park.  
D. concinna grows in grey-red
laterite, in winter-wet shrubland or heath.  Associated species include 
Eucalyptus tetraptera and Lambertia inermis.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Gibson,N Esp
Esp
?Shire 
Res.
12.10.93
200+
-
2
Gibson 
Esp
Esp
?MRWA Rd Res.
12.10.93
20+
-
3
Gibson,S Esp
Esp
Timber 
Res.
12.10.93
40+
Post-dist.
4
Fisheries Rd 
Esp
Esp
NR
27.10.90
21
Good
14.11.93
Not found
-
5
Old Ongerup Rd 
Alb
Rav
NP
27.9.88
1
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown, but regrowth may be stimulated by fire.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.

88
Summary and Recommendations
The population near Fisheries Road (no. 4) supposedly occurs on the disturbed margin of an old gravel pit, and was
flowering 7 months after the area had been burnt (March 1990).  Although this is one of the two known populations
occurring in a conservation reserve, a survey in November 1993 failed to relocate this population.  According to
A. Brown (personal communication), 
D. concinna does not require fire to regenerate.
The population in the Helms Arboretum (no. 2), where the original collection of the species was made in 1985, was
cleared in 1988 for arboriculture (Jones 1991).  Since then the area has regenerated and 
D. concinna was again found
there in 1993.  It is recommended that the population be clearly demarcated and no tree planting occur on this site.
Monitoring of the population is required. 
References
Jones (1991).

89
Dodonaea hexandra F.Muell.
SAPINDACEAE
Horned Hop Bush
A spreading shrub to 0.6 m tall, with separate male and female plants.  The linear (0.6-1.5 x 0.2 mm), sticky leaves
appear to cluster at the ends of branches.  Leaf margins are strongly rolled backwards towards the midrib (revolute)
causing a channel on the lower surface of the leaf.  Leaf tips are acute.  Flowers are usually solitary and are borne on
short stalks.  There are 3 persistent, ovate sepals per flower.  The fruit capsule is 3-angled, globular or oblong-shaped
(5-7 x 5-8 mm) and splits into segments when dry.
Flowering Period:  May - July
Fruiting Period:  September - November
Distribution and Habitat
Dodonaea hexandra is widespread in the southern mallee regions of South Australia, with extensions into north-west
Victoria.  It has also been found in Tasmania.  In Western Australia, 
D. hexandra has rarely been collected, and only
vague locality details are available.
In South Australia, this species grows in sandy loams overlying limestone, in mallee scrub communities dominated by
tree species such as 
Eucalyptus incrassata, E. porosa, E. socialis and E. anceps.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
?Mt Ragged 
Esp
Esp
?NP
2.11.1891
-
-
2
Hopetoun Alb
Rav
-
-
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
D. hexandra is poorly known in Western Australia.  According to West (1984a), the Gwynne and Helms specimens
could have been collected anywhere between Esperance and Fraser Range.  Nationally, this species does not appear to
be endangered, as more than 30 widely dispersed populations are known in South Australia (West 1984a).  Further
opportunistic survey is recommended.
References
Jessop and Toelken (1986), West (1984a).

90
Drosera salina N.G.Marchant & Lowrie
DROSERACEAE
A small, reddish plant up to 5 cm tall, with a basal rosette of green leaves and an erect flexuose stem with alternate
leaves.  The basal leaves have retentive glands around the margins with smaller glands within; the margins fold towards
each other forming a tube-like trap arrangement when covered with sand particles.  The leaves on the erect stem are
crescent-shaped with 2 lobes at the angles (2 x 2.5 mm), have retentive glands around the margins and smaller glands
within, and are arranged in a whorl about the stem; stalks are slender (8 mm).  The apex of the plant has 1 or 2 white
flowers borne on stalks (10-18 mm).  Sepals are green and maroon, dotted with black, and have margins which are
irregularly toothed.  Petals (5 x 2 mm) have a truncated apex and margins cut into rounded teeth.
The green basal rosette is generally covered in sand washed with water, with the reddish erect stem exposed to sunlight.
The basal leaves are unusual in that they are folded, possibly facilitating the capture of soil-borne insects.
Flowering Period:  July - August.  Dormant during dry periods.
Distribution and Habitat
Drosera salina grows east of Lake King.  It is found on the margins of salt lakes, almost to the water, in salt-free white
sand.  
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Lake King,E 
Esp
Rav
VCL
14.9.84
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
The known population is remote and not immediately threatened.  Further survey is required.
References
Lowrie (1987).

91
Drosera sp. Hatter Hill (G.J.Barrett 15.9.89)
DROSERACEAE
A pale green rosetted plant which is similar to 
Drosera bulbosa in habit.  Leaves are narrowly obovate with retentive
glands on the upper surface.  Numerous leafless flower stalks (longer than 3 cm) are produced from the centre of the
rosette.  Flowers are lilac (
D. bulbosa has white flowers). 
Flowering Period:  September (D. bulbosa flowers May - July)
Distribution and Habitat
Only one population is known of this 
Drosera taxon, which grows in an Allocasuarina campestris woodland in the
Hatter Hill area.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Population
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Hatter Hill 
Esp
Rav
?VCL
16.9.89
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
This taxon requires further survey to determine its conservation status and distribution.
References
Barrett (1989), Lowrie (1987).

92
Eremophila chamaephila Diels
MYOPORACEAE
A low, diffusely-branched shrub, 10-20 cm tall and up to 30 cm broad.  Leaves are pressed closely to the stem,
cylindrical (terete), 3-5 mm long, curved inwards, slightly succulent and have small wart-like protuberances on the lower
surface.  Calyx lobes are conspicuously glandular, warty and hairless.  Flowers are violet, with both the ovary and style
lacking hairs. 
Flowering Period:  November - December
Distribution and Habitat
Eremophila chamaephila occurs in the Scaddan-Salmon Gums area, in light brown, sandy clay loams or sand over clay,
usually adjacent to 
Eucalyptus woodland.  Disjunct populations occur 120 km to the east, near Clyde Hill, where it
grows in white clay loam with limestone.  It is most prevalent in disturbed sites.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Salmon Gums 
Esp
Esp
-
6.7.87
-
-
17.11.92
-
Not found
2
Salmon Gums,W 
Esp
Esp
-
11.31
-
-
17.11.92
-
Not found
3
Grass Patch,W 
Esp
Esp 
Shire Rd Res.
20.9.93
75
Good
4
Truslove 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
17.11.92
7
Good
5
Wiltshire Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
-
-
-
6*
Dowak 
Esp
Esp
NR & Western Power
20.11.92
10+
Good
7a
Clyde Hill,SE 
Esp
Esp
-
-
-
-
7b*
Clyde Hill,E
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Verge
14.11.93
5
Vulnerable
* = new population / sub-population
Response to Disturbance
Appears to be a disturbance opportunist and has the ability to resucker from rootstock.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Most of the known populations are small.
E. chamaephila occurs in the Dowak Nature Reserve.
References
Grieve and Blackall (1982).

93
Eremophila compressa Chinnock
MYOPORACEAE
An erect, often spindly shrub, 0.8-2.0 m tall.  Branches are covered in small warts and are sticky towards the apex.
Leaves are elliptical (8-16 x 2-7 mm) and usually have 1 or 2 small teeth on either side of the apex.  The cream-coloured
flowers (6.5-10 mm) are borne singly or in pairs in the leaf axils.  The 4 stamens, ovary and style are hairless, although
the inside of the corolla tube is bearded on the middle lower lip and the tube below it.  The tube may be spotted or
yellow-brown spotted on the inside.  The fruit is dry, hairless, shaped like two narrow cylinders pressed together and
slightly covered with small, wart-like projections.
Eremophila compressa is allied to E. saligna, but the former species can be recognised by its warty branches, 2 or 3
teeth near the apex (
E. saligna has numerous teeth along the leaf margins), and its bicylindrical fruit.
Flowering Period:  October - December, March (probably most of the year or after rains)
Distribution and Habitat
E. compressa is distributed over an area of about 70 km, from near Grass Patch to the north of Salmon Gums and east to
near Dingo Rock.  It is usually found on disturbed brown clay loams adjacent to roads or along the railway line, or in
loam over limestone.  It may occur in undisturbed 
Eucalyptus woodland or amongst mallee and scrub.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Salmon Gums,N 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
17.11.92
30+ 
Good
2a
Salmon Gums,W 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
17.11.92
15
Good
2b
Salmon Gums,W
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
17.11.92
10+
Good
& ?VCL
2c
Gimlet Rd
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
17.11.92
10+
Good
& ?VCL
3
Salmon Gums,N 
Esp
Esp
MRWA Rd Res.
18.11.92
Not found
Mown
4
Starcevich Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
11.10.79
<20
-
5
Salmon Gums 
Esp
Esp
-
-
-
-
6
Dingo Rock,SW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
20.10.90
Common
Good
Response to Disturbance
Appears to be a disturbance opportunist.  Its response to fire is not known.
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Presumed not susceptible.
Summary and Recommendations
R. Chinnock (unpublished data) indicates that 
E. compressa is insect pollinated.  Further survey and research on the
reproductive biology of this species is required.
E. compressa usually occurs in small, localised patches, with no known populations in conservation reserves.  The
suitability of uncleared land on the corner of Gimlet Road and Salmon Gums West Road for the purpose of a
conservation reserve should be investigated.
References
Chinnock (1985).

94
Eremophila oblonga Chinnock ms
MYOPORACEAE
A low, domed-shaped shrub, rarely more than 20 cm tall, but commonly up to 50 cm across.  Branches have small warts
scattered along them.  Leaves are small (2-5 x 1 mm), thick and oblong-shaped.  Flower buds are brownish-black and
develop into mauve to dark purple flowers (23 mm long).  The calyx is smooth on the outer surface and shortly-hairy
inside.
Eremophila oblonga ms is closely related to E. weldii which has longer leaves (4-10 mm).
Flowering Period:  October - November
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Distribution and Habitat
E. oblonga ms occurs east of the Fraser Range towards Caiguna and south to near Mt Coobaninya, with a known range
of 150 km.  It grows in light brown clay loam over shallow limestone in open woodland.  Associated plants include
Olearia muelleri, Westringia rigida and various Melaleuca, Eucalyptus and Atriplex species.
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Balladonia,S Esp
Dund
VCL
-
-
-
1b
Balladonia,S
Esp
Dund
VCL
-
-
-
2
Balladonia,S Esp
Dund
Pastoral 
Lease
16.11.93
20+
Good
3
Balladonia,E 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
-
-
-
4a
Newman Rock,NW 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
-
-
-
4b
Newman Rock,NW
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
17.11.93
50+
Good
5*
Parmango Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
14.11.93
50
Good
6*
Parmango Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
14.11.93
350+
Good
7a*
Ponier Rock,S 
Esp
Esp
VCL
14.11.93
10
Good
7b*
Ponier Rock,S
Esp
Esp
VCL
14.11.93
20
Good
8a*
Coragina Rock 
Esp
Esp
VCL
16.11.93
10
Good
8b*
Coragina Rock,N
Esp
Esp
VCL
16.11.93
500+
Good
9*
Coragina Rock,N 
Esp
Esp
VCL
16.11.93
1 000+
Good
10a
Balladonia Rd 
Esp
Esp
VCL
16.11.93
50+
Good
10b*
Balladonia Rd
Esp
Esp
VCL
16.11.93
1 000+
Good
10c*
Balladonia Rd
Esp
Esp
VCL
16.11.93
100+
Good
10d*
Balladonia Rd 
Esp
Dund
Pastoral Lease
16.11.93
50+
Good
11*
Balladonia Rd 
Esp
Dund
Pastoral Lease
16.11.93
150+
Good
12*
Balladonia Rd 
Esp
Dund
Pastoral Lease
16.11.93
20+
Good
13*
Balladonia,NW 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
16.11.93
500+
Good
14*
Balladonia,NW 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
16.11.93
100+
Good
15*
Balladonia,NW 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
16.11.93
10
Good
16*
Balladonia,NW 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
17.11.93
20+
Good
* = new population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown

95
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Recent surveys have found 
E. oblonga ms to be widespread and common in the Balladonia area.  Its known distribution
suggests that it would occur within the Dundas Nature Reserve.

96
Eriostemon sp. Cascades (M.A.Burgman 1535)
RUTACEAE
A shrub, 30 cm tall.  Leaves are almost globular.
This taxon is closely related to 
Eriostemon gardneri.
Flowering Period:  June - September
Distribution and Habitat
This taxa is known from only three populations which are distributed over a 50 km area, in the vicinity of Pyramid Lake
(north-west of Cascade).  It grows in white or brown sand over reddish sandy clay in mallee heath.

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