Western australian wildlife management program no. 21 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Esperance District



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Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Coujinup Hill,ENE 
Esp
Rav
VCL
6.1983
-
-
2
Pyramid Lake 
Esp
Esp
VCL
8.1983
-
-
3
Pyramid Lake,SW 
Esp
Rav
VCL
9.1983
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The known populations occur in a remote area which is not immediately threatened by clearing for agriculture.
Burgman (1985b) indicates that this taxon probably does not deserve specific status, but rather subspecies would be
appropriate.  The taxonomic status of these collections needs to be determined.  Further surveys are required.
Note - at the time of writing this report the Western Australian Herbarium specimens were on loan and not available for
inspection.
References
Burgman (1985b).

97
Eucalyptus burgmaniana L.A.S.Johnson & K.D.Hill ms
MYRTACEAE
A mallee, 5 m tall.  The smooth whitish and brownish bark sheds in ribbons.  Leaves are dull bluish.
Flowering Period:  October
Distribution and Habitat
This species is known from only two, closely occurring localities, north-west of Clyde Rock.  It occurs in pale grey
slightly sandy loam in an open woodland, associated with numerous 
Eucalyptus species.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Clyde Rock,NW 
Esp
Esp
VCL
6.11.86
Frequent
Good
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. burgmaniana ms lies on the northern boundary of the originally proposed 'Mt Beaumont Stage 2 - Land Release Area'
(Burgman 1985b).  It could be threatened if this land was to be released for agriculture in the future.  A survey in May
1993 failed to relocate this species, which is difficult to find due to the abundance of 
Eucalyptus species at this locality
(L. Johnson, personal communication).  Further survey is required to determine its range and abundance.  
References
Burgman (1985b).

98
Eucalyptus delicata L.A.S.Johnson & K.D.Hill ms
MYRTACEAE
A tree to 8 m tall, with rough bark to 3 m.  Adult leaves are stalked, narrow-lanceolate (60-95 x 4-8 mm), light green
and glossy with dense venation and numerous oil glands.  Inflorescences are unbranched and borne in leaf axils on
peduncles (stalks) which are cylindrical (terete) to flattened (6-10 mm).  There are 7 or more flowers in each
inflorescence.  Buds are stalked, ovoid to spindle-shaped with conical bud caps.
This species is reminiscent of 
Eucalyptus salmonophloia with its delicate buds and fruits, but differs in its rough bark,
narrower leaves and conical bud caps; 
E. delicata ms is a member of the series Oleosae.
Flowering Period:  March, August
Distribution and Habitat
E. delicata ms has a range of over 300 km from west of Southern Cross to east of Norseman and southwards to near
Peak Eleanora.  It grows in grey-white clay loam, sandy loam or red soil in woodland, associated with other eucalypts
including 
E. flocktoniaeE. valens, E. ovularis, E. longicornis and E. salubris.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Peak Eleanora,S 
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
20+
Good
1b*
Peak Eleanora,S
Esp
Esp
VCL
19.9.93
50+
Good
2
Peak Eleanora,NW 
Esp
Esp
NP
8.11.86
Frequent
-
3
Peak Charles,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
-
Frequent
-
4*
Rollond Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
20.9.93
100+
Good
& ?Private
5
Norseman,E 
Esp
Dund
MRWA Rd Res.
17.11.93
50+
Good
& NR
6
Bodallin,E Mer
Yil
-
7.4.83
-
-
7
Hyden,E Nar
Kon
-
24.8.88
-
-
* = new population / sub-population
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
According to L. Johnson (personal communication), 
E. delicata ms is not particularly rare, with the species being more
widespread than initially believed.  It occurs in the Peak Charles National Park.  Further survey is required.  

99
Eucalyptus jimberlanica L.A.S.Johnson & K.D.Hill
MYRTACEAE
A tree or mallee which grows to 10 m tall.  The glossy, dark green-brown or bronze bark is smooth throughout. Leaves
are glossy green, lanceolate (45-90 x 5-18 mm) with stalks up to 13 mm long.  Large oil glands are moderately or
sparsely distributed through the leaves.  The 7-flowered inflorescences are borne in axils of the leaves on thick, flattened
stalks (peduncles, 2-9 x 4 mm).  Flower stalks (pedicels, 1-2 mm) are angular.  Buds are ovoid to globular (7-10 x 6-8
mm) with a hemispherical bud cap.  The cup-shaped fruits (7-10 x 6-8 mm) are almost sessile (i.e. without stalks), have
4 locules and are often 2-winged; the disc is slightly raised or flat with the 4 broadly triangular valves exerted at their
apex.
Eucalyptus jimberlanica is related to E. terebra,  E. tortilis and E. creta, from which it can be distinguished by its
slightly smaller buds and fruits, and its hemispherical rather than acute bud cap which occurs in the latter 3 species.
Flowering Period:  Unknown
Distribution and Habitat
E. jimberlanica is known only from a single, small population near Norseman.  It grows in red-brown loam on a basic or
ultrabasic outcrop.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Population
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Jimberlana Hill 
Esp
Dund
Unvested Res.
13.11.87
-
Good
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. jimberlanica appears extremely restricted in distribution.  Jimberlana Hill has been recommended as a nature reserve,
however the proposal has been opposed by the Department of Minerals and Energy.  Further survey is urgently required.
References
Johnson and Hill (1991).

100
Eucalyptus varia subsp. salsuginosa Brooker & Hopper
MYRTACEAE
A sprawling mallee, 2-4 m tall, with smooth, grey-brown bark and a 'sock' of rough bark for 0.5-1.5 m at the base.
Leaves are alternate, lanceolate (to 80 x 13 mm), dull light bluish-green initially, turning glossy dark green when older.
Inflorescences are held on long stalks (peduncles, to 12 mm) and are up to 11-flowered; buds (25 x 4 mm) are borne on
stalks and have a recurved tip.  Fruits are barrel-shaped (to 10 x 6 mm).  The light grey-brown seed is more or less
spherical.
The thick, rough, basal bark and saline habitat distinguish this taxon from all other taxa in the 
Eucalyptus 'redunca'
group.  
E. varia subsp. salsuginosa can be distinguished from subsp. varia by having a straggly habit and lower stature
(less than 4 m).
Flowering Period:  Unknown
Distribution and Habitat
E. varia subsp. salsuginosa is known from a few localities, less than 40 km apart, north and north-west of Esperance,
particularly on tributaries of the Dalyup River.  It grows along salt drainage lines or on seasonally wet flats, often
associated with 
E. uncinata, E. conglobata, E. leptocalyx, E. micranthera or E. kessellii.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Speddingup West Rd 
Esp
Esp
?Shire Rd Res.
7.2.89
-
-
2
Speddingup West Rd 
Esp
Esp
?AR
7.2.89
-
-
3
Moonanup Rd 
Esp
Esp
?Shire Rd Res.
7.2.89
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
E. varia subsp. salsuginosa is poorly known and requires further survey.  The saline habitat occupied by this taxon is
rarely cleared for agriculture (Brooker and Hopper 1991).
References
Brooker and Hopper (1991).

101
Eucalyptus sp. B Ravensthorpe (K.R.Newbey 9715)
MYRTACEAE
A spreading, moderately-dense tree, 4 m tall, dividing just above ground level into 3 or 4 branches.  Bark is smooth,
light brown, shedding dark, medium grey; new growth is dark reddish-brown.  The alternate leaves are elliptical (45-90
x 13-18 mm) and bright, darkish green.  Leaf stalks are 15-20 mm long.  Single clusters of 4-6 flowers are borne in the
leaf axils on long, thick, strap-like, pendulous stalks (peduncles, 25-38 x 4 mm).  Stalks (pedicels) of individual flowers
are 6-7 mm long.  Buds have a cylindrical calyx (7-8 x 5 mm) with a cupped base and 2 ridges, one on each side
continuous with the stalk; the bud cap is horn-shaped.  Fruits are dull, dark, reddish-brown and shaped like an elongated
cup (12-13 x 11 mm) with a small ridge on either side and a rim extending 1 mm; the 4 valves are not exserted.
This taxon is closely related to 
Eucalyptus dielsii, but has longer buds and a narrower rim on the fruit.  It may be a
hybrid between 
E. dielsii and E. platypus or E. eremophila.
Flowering Period:  Unknown
Distribution and Habitat
This taxon occurs about 45 km west of Cascade, with the two known populations occurring within 1.5 km of each other.
It grows on well-drained clayey loam and is rare in 
E. dielsii low woodland, associated with E. platypus, E. eremophila
and 
E. transcontinentalis
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
West Point Rd 
Esp
Rav
?VCL
22.2.83
<5
-
1b
West Point Rd
Esp
Rav
?VCL 
-
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Research is required to confirm the taxonomic status of this species.  The rarity of its occurrence, and the proximity of
species with which it shares a number of characteristics, suggests that it may be a hybrid.
References
Newbey (1983).

102
Eutaxia sp. Hatter Hill (K.R.Newbey 6532)
PAPILIONACEAE
A small cushion or dome-shaped shrub, 2-4 cm tall and 12-35 cm wide.  Branches are spinescent.  Leaves are spirally
arranged and covered in a white powdery 'bloom' that comes off when rubbed (glaucous).  The calyx is not
conspicuously veined or ribbed.
Flowering Period:  November
Distribution and Habitat
This taxon is known from two areas, Hatter Hill and south of Peak Eleanora, about 110 km apart.  Near Hatter Hill it
grows in clayey sand in a 
Eucalyptus woodland on a gentle undulating plain.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Hatter Hill 
Esp
Rav
?VCL
13.11.79
Frequent
-
2
Hatter Hill,SSE 
Esp
Rav
?VCL
-
Common
-
3
Fields Rd 
Esp
Esp
?VCL &
9.84
-
-
?Shire Rd Res.
12.9.92
Not found
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Eutaxia sp. Hatter Hill is currently undergoing taxonomic review (T. Macfarlane, personal communication).  It is not
known to occur in any conservation reserve and appears to be rare.
In September 1992, 
E. sp. Hatter Hill was searched for at the collection site south of Peak Eleanora (pop. no. 3) but was
not found.  The narrow, western road reserve was very disturbed and Vacant Crown Land on the east side of the road
has been cleared for a small dam.  Further intensive survey of the area is recommended to determine whether this
population still exists.  
The Hatter Hill area was surveyed in October 1992, without this taxon being located; specific localities for these
populations were unknown.  Further survey is required.
References
Burgman (1985b).

103
Gonocarpus pycnostachyus (F.Muell.) Orchard
HALORAGACEAE
An erect herb, to 25 cm tall, with 4-30 red to green hairy stems branched at the base and arising in a rosette from the
crown of a taproot.  Leaves are oval-shaped, very variable in size (8-18 x 4-8 mm), softly-hairy, and have minute teeth
along the margin; the margin is white and thickened.  Lower leaves are opposite, soon becoming alternate.  Clusters of
flowers (indeterminate spike) are borne in alternate bracts.  Flowers are 4-merous on minute stalks (0.5 mm).  The 4
green sepals have hairs along the margins, but are otherwise hairless.  Petals are deep red to green (2 mm), hooded, and
have shaggy hairs near the 2 front-united petals.  There are 8 stamens with yellow (abortive) to deep red, linear-oblong
anthers.  Fruits are pear-shaped (1.0-1.2 x 0.9 mm), contracting into an 8-ribbed neck in the upper half; the lower half
has 2 transverse rows of prominent warts and is covered with minute, stiff hairs.  The wall of the ripened fruit is
membranous; there is 1 seed per fruit. 
This species is similar to 
Gonocarpus confertifolius and G. nodulosus, sharing the pear-shaped fruit and hairy foliage.  It
is distinguished from 
G. confertifolius by its longer leaves and shorter, broader calyx lobes, and from G. nodulosus by
its leaf arrangement and size, and flowers with 8 stamens.  
Flowering Period:  December
Distribution and Habitat
G. pycnostachyus was first collected in 1885 near Israelite Bay.  It was recently rediscovered near Mt Heywood and Mt
Merivale.  This taxon appears to be a pioneer species, annual or at most a short-lived perennial, appearing after fire.
Near Mt Heywood, before fire, the vegetation was dominated by dense shrubby Proteaceae growing on deep sand.
North-east of Mt Merivale, it grows on shallow sand or clay loams around a rock depression, in an area which was
recently burnt (Orchard 1993).
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Israelite Bay 
Esp
Esp
NR
1885
-
2
Mt Heywood,NE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
26.12.91
Abundant
Post-fire
3
Mt Heywood,ENE 
Esp
Esp
VCL
1.1.92
Very common
Post-fire
4
Mt Merivale,NE 
Esp
Esp
-
17.4.92
-
-
Response to Disturbance
G. pycnostachyus is a disturbance opportunist, being rediscovered by W.R. Archer in December 1991, regenerating in
large numbers after a fire (early 1991) to the north-east of Mt Heywood.  Subsequently, another population was found
near Mt Merivale on recently burned ground (Orchard 1993). 
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Monitoring of the known populations of 
G. pycnostachyus to determine its reproductive biology.  Further survey
(especially after fire), particularly near Israelite Bay to confirm its occurrence in the Nature Reserve.
References
Orchard (1975, 1990, 1993).

104
Gonocarpus simplex (R.Br. ex Britten) Orchard
HALORAGACEAE
An inconspicuous, erect, perennial herb, to 40 cm tall, with almost leafless stems.  Stems are smooth, narrow, flexible
and round.  The alternate, triangular, red bracts (1.7 mm) and linear bracteoles (1 mm) are deciduous.  Flowers are 4-
merous with male or bisexual flowers apparently on different plants.  The bisexual flowers lack stalks, have triangular
sepals (0.4 mm), greenish, long-clawed petals (1.7 mm), 8 stamens, and an 8-ribbed, shiny ovary.  Males are similar,
except they are borne on stalks (2 mm) and have a rudimentary ovary.  The fruit is narrowly cylindrical (2 mm), 8-
ribbed, hairless and green. 
Flowering Period:  October - December
Distribution and Habitat
Gonocarpus simplex grows in swamps in the south-west and along the south coast of Western Australia.  In the
Esperance District it occurs in swamps in the Cape Le Grand National Park and nearby areas.  It prefers grey peaty sand
to sandy clays in association with species of Restionaceae and Cyperaceae.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1a
Cape Le Grand Rd 
Esp
Esp
Shire Rd Res.
17.12.74
Frequent
-
1b
Cape Le Grand Rd
Esp
Esp
Private
18.11.79
-
-
1c
Cape Le Grand
Esp
Esp
NP
12.12.92
Abundant
Good
2
Walpole Point 
Wal
Manj
-
12.12.90
-
-
3
Northcliffe,E Wal
Manj
-
11.12.87
-
-
4 Bow 
River 
Wal
Dnmk
-
12.12
-
-
5
Yelverton forest 
Bsltn
Bsltn
-
8.11.89
Rare
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
Further survey of this inconspicuous species is required.  It is possibly quite common in swampy areas of the Cape Le
Grand National Park.
References
Orchard (1990).

105
Gratiola pedunculata R.Br.
SCROPHULARIACEAE
Stalked Brooklime, Heartsease
A perennial herb, 13-50 cm tall, which is erect or often creeps along the ground rooting at the base.  Branches are
densely covered with glandular hairs.  Leaves are opposite, linear-ovate (10-30 x 3-10 mm), finely toothed, 3-veined at
the base and clasp the stem.  Glands form small, golden globules on the leaves, bracteoles and sepals.  Cream-white
flowers are borne singly or rarely in pairs in leaf axils on long stalks (8-26 mm); the corolla is at least as long as the
calyx and has short and broad lips, the upper one being very shortly 2-lobed.  Seed is small (0.5 mm long), dark-brown,
with prominent thin longitudinal ridges and transverse ridges between.
The specimen collected in Cape Arid National Park has pink flowers which is atypical.
Flowering Period:  October - November, ?January - May
Distribution and Habitat
Gratiola pedunculata occurs in South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland.  In Western Australia, it
was collected by Drummond in 1848, and in 1989 this species or a closely related taxon was collected in Cape Arid
National Park.  It grows in moist soil on the banks of rivers and lagoons, or margins of rock pools.
Conservation Status
Current:  Priority 1
Known Populations
Pop.
Land
Last
No. of
No.
Population District
Shire
Status
Survey
Plants
Condition
1
Swan River Colony
-
-
-
1848
?Extinct
-
2
Pine Hill 
Esp
Esp
NP
28.10.89
-
-
Response to Disturbance
Unknown
Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback
Unknown
Summary and Recommendations
The impact of feral donkeys, cattle and rabbits which visit the water bodies around which 
G. pedunculata is likely to
grow is unknown.  Further survey is required.
G. pedunculata occurs within the Cape Arid National Park.
References
Barker (1986), Bentham (1869).

106
Grevillea phillipsiana McGill.
PROTEACEAE
An attractive shrub, 1-1.5 m tall and 1-2 m wide, with hairy branchlets.  Leaves are linear (35 x 1 mm) with conspicuous
parallel veins, have a stiff sharp point at the tip and are often in crowded clusters at the end of small branches.  Flower
heads, usually about 10-flowered, are clustered at the ends of branches.  Flowers are red or light yellow, silky-hairy on
the exterior, have a hairy ovary and a red style (22 mm) which is hairy at the base; the pollen presenter is very oblique
and oblong-shaped.
Grevillea phillipsiana is related to G. deflexa and G. lavandulacea from which it differs in having narrow linear leaves
with parallel veins and a hairless style with silky hairs at its base.

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