Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SW of Badgingarra

D

National Park, Shire



Road Reserve

15.8.1991

25

Undisturbed, but 



gravel scrape is clos

to the population



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


58

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements 

-  Careful management of the site is required, particularly during firebreak maintenance and buffer burns.

-  Monitor population regularly.

-  Efforts should be made to prevent further encroachment of the gravel pit towards the population and to

rehabilitate the area which has been excavated.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required in suitable habitat, particularly in conservation areas near the known

population.

-  Conduct research on fire response.



References

Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Grayling (1989), Grayling and Brooker (1992), Kelly 



et al. (1995), Napier et

al. (1988a).

59

Eucalyptus crispata Brooker & Hopper

MYRTACEAE

[

Eucalyptus sp. Yandanooka (M.I.H.Brooker 9205)]

Yandanooka Mallee

A mallee to 5m tall, erect or spreading, with smooth grey bark on the upper parts but with the basal bark

persistent as peeling flakes.  The juvenile leaves are dull and bluish in colour.  The pith of the branchlets is

glandular.  The adult leaves are up to 1.5 cm wide and 9 cm long, lanceolate to sickle-shaped, green in

colour and glossy.  The vein network is dense and there are numerous oil glands.  The inflorescences have

up to 13 flowers, and have peduncles up to 16 mm long.  The buds are 10 x 4 mm long, the operculum is

cylindrical to conical.  It is the same width as the hypanthium at the join on the mature buds.  The fruit has

a short stalk and is conical to cup-shaped, with a thin rim, a descending disc and 3 or 4 valves below the

level of the rim.  The seeds are pale grey-brown, almost spherical or cuboid in shape.

This species is similar to 

Eucalyptus arachnaea, which has longer, narrower buds with a conical to horn-

shaped operculum, which is narrower than the hypanthium.  It is also related to



 E. accedens which is a tree

with smooth, powdery bark.  There is some variation in 



E. crispata in the form of buds and fruit and in the

overall appearance.  Both 



E. arachnaea and E. accedens occur with the species at most populations except

one which has been partially cleared.  It is thought that



 E. crispata may be of recent hybrid origin with

these species as parents.



Flowering Period:  April-June

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs in the Yandanooka-Eneabba area and south to Boothendarra, a range of ca. 90 km.  A total of less

than 150 plants have been estimated and only two populations occur on conservation reserves, one of ca. 30

plants, the other at present known from one plant.



E. crispata grows on clayey soils of shallow gullies, or on lateritic or granitic breakaways and slopes.

Associated species include 



Eucalyptus arachnaea,  E. accedens, E. wandoo, Santalum acuminatum,

Allocasuarina campestris and Melaleuca sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  Yandanooka

TS

Nature Reserve



13.3.1986

30 est.


Undisturbed

2.  S of Eneabba

Co

Private


1.7.1992

5

Undisturbed



3.  S of Eneabba

Co

Private



20.4.1989

2 clumps


Undisturbed

4.  W of Arrino

TS

Private


7.1989

2

Undisturbed



5.  First North Road

TS

Shire Road Reserve



23.11.1989

20+


Undisturbed

6.  Yandanooka Hill

TS

VCL


23.11.1989

20+


Undisturbed

7.  Boothendarra

D

Nature Reserve



29.4.1992

5+

Healthy and



undisturbed

8.  Dookanooka

TS

Nature Reserve



22.11.1989

1

Undisturbed



Response to Disturbance

60

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Protection of all populations from accidental destruction is essential.

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Ensure that markers are in place at population 5.

-  Maintain liaison with land owners and land managers.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Test seed to determine if this species complies with criteria for DRF status.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey in reserves on which populations 7 and 8 are located to determine full extent of the

populations.

-  Resurvey populations 2 and 3 and obtain precise location details with Global Positioning System.

-  Conduct research on the fire response of the species.

References

Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Brooker and Hopper (1991), Kelly 



et al. (1995), Napier et al. (1988a).

61

Eucalyptus dolorosa Brooker & Hopper

MYRTACEAE

Dandaragan Mallee

A low mallee to 2.5 m tall with stout stems and rough grey bark on the older stems.  The juvenile leaves are

broadly falcate, light bluish-grey in colour.  The adult leaves are slightly glossy, green in colour, lanceolate

to falcate, 10 x 2 cm.  They have a moderately dense vein network and numerous oil glands.  The

inflorescences are axillary, but are clustered at the leafless ends of branchlets, appearing apparently

terminal.  There are 7 flowers in each, the buds have pedicels up to 1 cm long, and are rhomboid in shape, 9

x 6 mm with a slightly beaked operculum.  The stamens are very numerous.  The fruits have stalks to 7 mm

long, and are cup-shaped to globose, 1 x 1.4 cm, with four valves.  The seeds are brown, pyramidal and

winged.

This species is distantly related to 



Eucalyptus todtiana and E. lateritica, but differs in the small falcate

leaves, apparently terminal inflorescences, long pedicels and glaucous juvenile leaves.  The winged seed

places the species in this group which also includes 

E. buprestium, E. erectifolia and E. johnsoniana.  E.

dolerosa is thought to be a relict species barely surviving extinction due to increased dryness of the climate

in the late Pleistocene period.



Flowering Period:  March

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from a single population on the slopes and summit of a lateritic hill east of Cataby.  The population

comprises eight ‘clumps’ over a few hectares on private property, which has been left uncleared by the

owners for soil and nature conservation.  Although the species has flowered each year for four years

following its discovery in 1987, it was not found in fruit until February 1991.  It grows in mallee heath in

association with  



Eucalyptus gittinsiiE. pluricaulis and E. abdita amongst massive ironstone blocks over

low scrub with associated species including 



Hakea lissocarpha, H.  undulata, H. obliqua, Calothamnus

quadrifidus, Acacia pulchella and Scholtzia sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  E of Cataby

D

Private


30.4.1991

25 plants or 8 ‘clumps’

Undisturbed

Response to Disturbance

The population was burnt in 1978 and subsequently regenerated, but fruit set was not observed until 1991.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Maintain close liaison with the landowner on whose property the population occurs. 



62

-  Inspect population at regular intervals.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Protect, where possible, from frequent fires.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey of likely habits on lateritic hills in the surrounding area.

-  Research on the reproductive biology and genetic structure of the population.

-  Promote fruit set by hand pollination if necessary.



References

Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Brooker and Hopper (1993), Kelly 



et al. (1995).

Illustration by E. Cooper (in Brooker and Hopper 1993).



63

Eucalyptus impensa Brooker & Hopper

MYRTACEAE

[

Eucalyptus sp. Eneabba (M.I.H.Brooker 9736)]

Eneabba Mallee



Eucalyptus impensa was found at the type locality in 1987, but was not seen in flower until July 1991.  It is

a straggling mallee to 1.5 m tall, with smooth stems, which are grey over pale copper in colour.  The shoots

of the new growth are green, not glaucous.  The leaves on the mature plant are pale green to yellow-green

(not glaucous), on short, stout petioles to 1 cm long.  They are usually opposite, ovate in shape, to 14 x 8

cm.  The inflorescence is single-flowered, in the axil of a leaf, the flower with a thick peduncle to 2 cm

long.  The bud has a hemispherical hypanthium and beaked operculum, which is slightly ribbed.  It is up to

5 x 2.5 cm, including the pedicel length.  The flowers are pink in colour.  The fruit is sessile on a thick

pedicel to 2 cm long.  It is hemispherical in shape, to 2.5 x 6 cm, with a conspicuous raised disc and five

exserted valves.  The seeds are brown and asymmetrically pyramidal in shape. The large fruits are similar

to those of



 E. macrocarpa, but E. impensa is distinguished by the non-glaucous leaves which have short

stalks.  It



 is also a much smaller mallee than E. macrocarpa.

Flowering Period:  June-July

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

E. impensa is restricted to six populations with a total of less than eighty individuals growing over a range

of ca. 3 km to the south-east of Eneabba.  Five of these populations are on a nature reserve and the sixth on

private property.  The species has also been recorded from ca. 70 km to the south-east of the known

populations, but was not refound during this survey, although remnant woodland of 



Eucalyptus

macrocarpa occurs at the recorded location.  It grows in very open shrub mallee over low heath on grey,

gravelly sand on undulating plains and low breakaway slopes.  This species occurs in association with other

mallees, 

Eucalyptus tetragona,  E. johnsoniana, E.  todtiana  and  E. macrocarpa subsp. macrocarpa,  and

other species including 



Xanthorrhoea  sp.,  Hakea incrassata, H. conchifolia, H. obliqua, Banksia grossa,

B. chamaephyton, B. lanataCalothamnus quadrifidus and Verticordia grandis.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SW of Eneabba

Co

Nature Reserve



12.12.1992

12

Undisturbed



2.  SW of Eneabba

Co

Private



19.4.1989

6

Undisturbed



3.  SW of Eneabba

Co

Nature Reserve



20.4.1989

5, 1 "clump"

Undisturbed

4.  SW of Eneabba

Co

Nature Reserve



19.4.1989

40

Undisturbed



5.  SW of Eneabba

Co

Nature Reserve



20.4.1989

6

Undisturbed



6.  SW of Eneabba

Co

Nature Reserve



1.3.1991

4 (originally 10 +)

Undisturbed

1.* NW of Moora

D

Shire Road Reserve



or Private ?

30.7.1980

-

-


64

Response to Disturbance

Regenerates from the lignotubers after fire has destroyed the above ground parts, producing coppice of

light green, petiolate leaves.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.


-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further taxonomic research is required at population 7.

-  Further survey for new populations.

-  Conduct further research on the fire response of the species.



References

Brooker and Kleinig (1990),



 Brooker and Hopper (1993), Kelly et al. (1995).

Illustration by E. Cooper (in Brooker and Hopper 1993).



65

Eucalyptus johnsoniana Brooker & Blaxell

MYRTACEAE

Johnson's Mallee

A small, spreading mallee to 2 m tall, forming dense clumps to several metres across.  It has a dense crown

of glossy, dark green to blue-green leaves, which often extends to the ground.  The bark is grey-brown

below, smooth, grey-brown to cream above and slightly rough and flaky at the base.  The leaves are

lanceolate, to 12 x 1.5 cm with numerous oil glands.  There are 7 flowers in each unbranched, axillary

inflorescence.  The buds are club to pear-shaped, with a hemispherical to slightly conical cap.  The fruits

are globular, ca. 1 x 1 cm with a small opening and thick rim, the disc sunken with three or four valves

which may protrude slightly.  The seeds are brown and pyramidal.  Occurs often in association with a

mallee form of 

Eucalyptus todtiana, which has a rough, fibrous bark and apparently glandless leaves.  It

may be confused also with 



E. lateritica and E. suberea, both of which have double conic buds with conical

opercula and 



E. lateritica has cup-shaped fruits.  E. suberea has falcate adult leaves and up to 20 buds per

inflorescence.



Flowering Period:  July-January

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs between Eneabba and Badgingarra over a geographic range of ca. 30 km.  The largest number of

populations occurs in an area north of Warradarge Hill, extending north to a few kms south of Eneabba and

south to the Coomallo area.  When described in 1978 by Brooker and Blaxell,



 E. johnsoniana was known

from only three populations along the Brand Highway.  A total of ca. 27 populations are now known with

about 300-350 plants.  There has been difficulty in resolving the total number of populations found in the

past owing to their scattered nature in relatively large areas of uncleared native heath.  Grows as an

emergent over dense low heath as small populations or as isolated plants on undulating sandplains, lateritic

mesas and uplands.  Grows in association with 



Eucalyptus todtiana, E. tetragona, E. impensa,  E.

macrocarpa, E. drummondii and E. pendens in grey or white sand over laterite.  Associated heath species

include 


Dryandra armata, Lambertia multiflora, Hibbertia hypericoides, Hakea conchifoliaAllocasuarina

humilis and Xanthorrhoea sp.  An unpublished survey (Lievense 1981) reported that the species occurred in

the Lesueur area, but a voucher specimen from the survey and Beard 7814, from Mt Lesueur, identified at

that time as

 E. aff. johnsoniana, have been identified subsequently as E. suberea.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  Near Coomallo Hill

D

MRWA Road Reserve 14.8.1991



1 “clump” 

plants in 1979

Undisturbed

2.  Tootbardie Road

D

Shire Road Reserve



Private

14.8.1991

7+

Undisturbed



3.*  NW of Coomallo Hill

-

Private



10.1980

-

Not recently



found

4.*  Brand Highway, N o

population 1

Co

MRWA Road Reserve 19.8.1982



-

Not recently

found


66

5.*  Brand Highway, S of th

Coorow-Greenhead Road

Co

MRWA Road Reserve 7.10.1975



-

Not recently

found

6.*  Brand Highway N o



Banovich Road

Co 


MRWA Road Reserve 7.10.1975

1

-



Populations Known in the Moora District (Cont'd)

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

7.  South Eneabba Natur

Reserve


Co

Nature Reserve

MRWA Road Reserve

1.3.1991


30+

Undisturbed

8.  NW of Coomallo Hill

Co

Private



17.11.1981

-

In flower



9.  E side of Brand Highway

Co

MRWA Road Reserve



1.3.1991

1+

Undisturbed



10.  Lesueur National Park

Co

National Park



15.10.1980

-

-



11.  South Eneabba Natur

Reserve


Co

Nature Reserve

20.4.1989

1

-



12.  Brand Highway

Co

Nature Reserve



1.3.1991

8

Disturbed



13.  Brand Highway, N o

Tootbardie Road

Co

MRWA Road Reserve



27.7.1984

50

-



14.  N of Tootbardie Road

Co

Private



17.11.1981

-

-



15.  N of Warradarge Hill

Co

Nature Reserve



20.11.1988

50+


Undisturbed

1.*  S of Eneabba

Co

MRWA Road Reserve



1986

-

-



2.*  S of Eneabba

Co

MRWA Road Reserve



11.3.1986

-

-



1.  S of Eneabba

Co

Nature Reserve



20.9.1988

-

-



2.  NNW of Warradarge Hill

Co

Nature Reserve



20.4.1989

50

-



3.  NNW of Warradarge Hill

Co

Nature Reserve



20.4.1989

5

-



4.  Shaw Road

Co

Nature Reserve



Shire Road Reserve

1.7.1992


50+

Undisturbed

5.  Shaw Road

Co

Nature Reserve



1.3.1991

17

Undisturbed



6.  N of Warradarge Hill

Ca

Nature Reserve



14.8.1990

7 clumps


Undisturbed

7.  Shaw Road

Co

Nature Reserve



1.3.1991

5+

Undisturbed



8.  N of Warradarge Hill

Co

Nature Reserve



12.1992

100+


-

9.  ESE of Warradarge Hill

Co

Shire Road Reserve



12.1992

-

-



1.*  S of Eneabba

Co

VCL (Mining Lease)



27.9.1977

-

Destroyed



by mining

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Maintain liaison with managers of land on which the populations occur.

-  All populations need to be revisited and plotted accurately.

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Ensure that markers are in place at all road reserve populations.


67

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

-  Further survey is required, populations 3-6, 8, 13 and 14 urgently require inspection.



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