Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Research Requirements

-  Conduct research on fire response of the species.



References

Brooker and Blaxell (1978), Brooker and Hopper (1986), Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Kelly 



et al. (1995),

Lievense (1981), Napier 



et al. (1988a), Rye and Hopper (1981).

68

Eucalyptus lateritica Brooker & Hopper

MYRTACEAE

Laterite Mallee, Mt Michaud Mallee

A low, erect-stemmed mallee or tree-mallee to 3 m, usually with rough grey-brown bark on the lower stems

or mostly smooth.  The leaves are thin and slightly glossy, green to dark green on both surfaces, lanceolate

in shape and up to 10 x 1.5 cm with sparse venation and numerous oil glands.  There are up to 11 club-

shaped buds in each axillary inflorescence, and they are slightly rough-surfaced, double conic in shape,

without a scar, up to 1 x 0.7 cm.  The fruits have a thick rim, and are cup-shaped or truncate-globose, with a

ring-like or obliquely descending disc, to 1.5 x 1.5 cm.  The seeds are brown and narrowly pyramidal with

lateral wings.  



Eucalyptus lateritica appears to be most closely related to E. todtiana from which it is

distinguished by its finer bark, erect stems, longer pedicels, double-conic buds, the sparse venation and

presence of glands in the leaves and by the winter flowering season.  The specific name refers to the

lateritic gravels which dominate the upland regions on which it grows, in contrast to the deep sands on

which 

E. todtiana grows.

Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Restricted to the Gairdner Range, Coomallo Hill area where it occurs in small, isolated populations of

usually less than 20 individuals on the slopes and breakaways of dissected, lateritic uplands.  It has an

identical geographic range to that of 



E. suberea, extending from Mt Lesueur for ca. 30 km inland, and is

found in the same habitat.  It grows in sandy lateritic soils in mallee heath with 



Eucalyptus accedens, E.

gittinsii, E. suberea, E. drummondii, E. marginata and E. gardneri.  Associated species of the heath include

Banksia lanata, B. micrantha, Hakea trifurcata, Calothamnus quadrifidus and Dryandra species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.

Warradarge



Co

Private


10.1984

50 est.


-

2.

Coomallo E of Highway 



D

Nature Reserve

22.10.1984

5 est.


-

3. & 13.  SE of Warradarge

Co

Private


28.2.1991

3 “clumps” of

100+ stems

Good


4.

Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



5.1982

1

-



5.

NE of Mt Lesueur

Co

National Park



3.1983

3

-



6.

NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



1.3.1983

5

-



7.

S of Mt  Peron

D

National Park



2.3.1983

4

-



8.

NE of Mt Michaud

D

National Park



3.1983

1

-



9. & 10.  Mt Benia

D

Unvested Reserve



3.3.1983

1+

Undisturbed



11. Coomallo W of Highway

D

Nature Reserve



3.3.1983

5

Insect damaged



12. Coomallo

D

Private



3.7.1992

30 est.


Disturbed

14. W of Mt Michaud

D

National Park



7.1988

10

-



15. W of Mt Michaud

D

National Park



7.1988

10

-



69

Response to Disturbance

Populations 3 and 13 were last burnt in 1966.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Inspect populations regularly.

-  Maintain liaison with landowners.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Resurvey populations 3 and 13 and obtain precise location information with a Global Positioning

System.

-  Further research is required on the relationship of the species to other apparently related species.



-  Conduct research on the fire response of the species and its susceptibility to Phytophthora species.

References

Brooker and Hopper (1986), Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Kelly 



et al. (1995), Napier et al. (1988a), Rye

and Hopper (1981).



70

Eucalyptus leprophloia Brooker & Hopper 

MYRTACEAE

Scaly-butt Mallee

An erect mallee to 5 m tall, with light grey-brown, loose, curly bark for 1 m from the base, smooth, grey to

pinkish-grey above.  The juvenile leaves are ovate, dull, blue-green to glaucous, to 8 x 5 cm.  The adult

leaves are lanceolate to broad-lanceolate, 14 x 2.5 cm, dull and green, with fine venation and scattered

glands.  There are 7 to 11 buds in the inflorescence which is on a flattened peduncle to 1 cm long.  The

buds are ovoid, with short pedicels and an obtusely conical operculum.  The fruits are cup-shaped to barrel-

shaped, without stalks or almost so.  The disc is descending and there are three or four valves to rim level.

The seed is grey-black and almost smooth.

This species is related to 

Eucalyptus accedens and E. zopherophloia.  E. accedens is a tree with smooth,

pinkish-white, powdery bark, with dull, blue-green adult leaves.  



E. zopherophloia is a blackbutt, with dark,

fibrous bark on the lower half of the stems.  Both its juvenile and adult leaves are narrower than those of



 E.

leprophloia and the oil gland pattern differs.  It occurs on calcareous soil, not on lateritic soils as does E.

leprophloia.

Flowering Period:  August-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from five populations, over ca. 90 km, three to the north of Badgingarra, and two on the northern

border of the Moora District in the Mt Adams area.  There has been an unconfirmed report of a sixth

population in the latter area.  One population grows on slopes in brown loam over laterite, as an emergent

mallee over scrub with associated species including 

Eucalyptus accedens, Allocasuarina humilis,

Gastrolobium spinosum and Dryandra fraseri.  The most northerly  population occurs on gentle valley

slopes in low woodland of 



E. accedens over heath in white sand, and a population in the same area occurs

on grey sand and laterite with 



E. todtiana.  At the type location it grows in grey sandy clay loam on slopes

of a drainage line between two breakaways with 



E. falcata and E. gittinsii over heath.  It has also been

recorded growing with 



E. calophylla and E. wandoo over open low scrub with Hakea undulata, and

Calothamnus sanguineus in grey sand and lateritic gravel.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  NE of Coomallo

Co

Private


28.2.1991

60-70 (in 1 clump)

with 190 stems

Healthy and

undisturbed

2.  Mt Adams

TS

VCL


15.11.1979

1+

Undisturbed



3.  Mt Benia

D

Unvested Reserve



2.5.1991

1+ (20 stems)

Undisturbed

4.  ESE of Mt Adams

TS

Private


24.5.1991

70+ stems

Undisturbed, but

buds have aborted

due to insect damage

5.  Boothendarra

D

Nature Reserve



29.4.1992

5+

Healthy



71

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Inspect populations regularly.

-  Maintain liaison with landowners.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey for new populations particularly to the northern end of the species’ known range where

population 2 requires urgent inspection, and there is an unconfirmed report of a sixth population.

-  Conduct research on fire response of the species.



References

Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Brooker and Hopper (1993), Kelly 



et al. (1995), Napier et al. (1988a).

72

Eucalyptus pruiniramis L.A.S.Johnson & K.D.Hill

MYRTACEAE

[

Eucalyptus sp. Midlands Highway (M.I.H.Brooker 8734)]

Midlands Gum

A tree or mallee to 7 m, usually 2.5-5 m, with dull leaves and glaucous branchlets.  The tree forms of this

species have a stocking of rough, grey bark on the lower trunk but the mallee forms have smooth bark

throughout the stem.  The leaves are dull, grey-green, broad-lanceolate, 8-15 cm long.  The inflorescences

are simple, 7-11 flowered, the buds ovoid to fusiform, glaucous, with a conical bud cap.  The fruits are cup-

shaped to cylindrical.

This species is closely related to



 Eucalyptus accedens, differing in its rough bark, slightly larger buds and

glaucous fruits, buds and branchlets.  It is thought to hybridise with 



E. accedens in some places.

Flowering Period:  January

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known from nine populations over a range of ca. 160 km from Mogumber to Arrino, north

of Three Springs.  Grows in open, low mallee woodland emergent from heath or scrub with 

Allocasuarina

campestris, and species of Dryandra, GrevilleaGastrolobium and Acacia in yellow sand or brown, sandy

loam and lateritic gravel or quartz, usually on midslopes, fairly high in the landscape.



Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.  NW of Watheroo

Mo

Shire Road Reserve



Private

14.11.1990

5-7

Some damage from



fencing and grading

2.  NW of Watheroo

Mo

National Park



22.8.1991

4

Undisturbed, at edge



of track

3.  NW of Three Springs

TS

MRWA Road Reserve



19.9.1991

4

Partly disturbed



4.  Gillingarra

VP

Private



28.4.1992

5

Undisturbed



5.  NW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Reserve



25.9.1990

4

In gravel pit



6.  NW of Watheroo

Mo

Private



17.11.1992

18

Trees only



remaining,

understorey cleared

and weedy

7.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private


21.2.1994

6

Growing around



gravel pit and in

paddock, owner will

fence.

8.  NW of Watheroo



Mo

National Park

12.9.1993

6

Undisturbed



9.  NW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Reserve



18.8.1993

10+


Undisturbed

73

Response to Disturbance

Plants at population 1 produced coppice after damage by road grading.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Inspect populations regularly.

-  Maintain liaison with landowners/managers and local government authorities.

-  Fence populations 6 and 7.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.


-  Ensure that markers are in place at population 9.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Conduct research on fire response of the species.



References

Hill and Johnson (1992), Kelly 



et al. (1995).

74

Eucalyptus rhodantha Blakely & H.Steedman var. petiolaris Blakely

MYRTACEAE

Rose Mallee

Eucalyptus rhodantha var. petiolaris differs from var. rhodantha in its leaves, which have short stalks, and

which are never stem clasping.  They are yellowish-green and heart-shaped to lanceolate in shape.



Flowering Period:  March-November (peaking June-August)

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Restricted to the Watheroo and Three Springs areas, where it is sometimes associated with var. 



rhodantha

in sand on flat or undulating country.  A total of only nine plants has been recorded, from road reserve and

private property.  A Management Plan and a Recovery Plan detailing strategies for conservation have been

prepared (Sampson 



et al. 1990) and are in the process of implementation.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Reserve



15. 7.1993

1

-



2.  SW of Three Springs

TS

Private



15.7.1993

1

-



3.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private



1.6.1994

2

Moderate



4.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private



15.6.1993

2

Healthy



5.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private



5.8.1993

1

-



6.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private



29.7.1980

1

-



7.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private



29.7.1980

1

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Protection from road maintenance and grazing is essential.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey required in the area north-west of Moora.



75

References

Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Kelly and Coates (1995), Kelly 



et al. (1995), Napier et al. (1988a), Sampson

et al. (1990).

76

Eucalyptus rhodantha Blakely & H.Steedman var. rhodantha

MYRTACEAE

Rose Mallee, Rose Gum

A low, straggling mallee to 3 m high, with smooth, grey-brown bark and white-grey branches.  The leaves

are blue-grey and glaucous, stalkless and usually in opposite pairs on the branches.  They are rounded to

heart-shaped, usually pointed at the tip and up to 8 cm x 8 cm.  The flower buds are grey and pendulous, up

to 5.5 x 4 cm, with the pointed cap longer than the base.  The large red (rarely white) flowers are borne on

long pedicels and peduncles, 1-3.5 cm long and there is usually one, but may be up to three flowers per

inflorescence.  Each flower is up to 7.5 cm across.  The fruits are more or less hemispherical, or top-

shaped, up to 3 cm x 5 cm, with protruding valves.  The seeds are dark brown and winged.

Distinguished from var. 

petiolaris by the stalkless, rounded leaves which are glaucous and stem clasping.

Similar to 



Eucalyptus macrocarpa, which has more elongated leaves, larger, stalkless flowers and fruits

and the buds and fruits are not pendulous.



Flowering Period: March to November (peak flowering June to August) depending on the site (McNee

1986, Sampson 1988)



Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Endemic to the Moora District where it is restricted to an area between Watheroo and Three Springs,

occurring sometimes in association with var. 

petiolaris.  Grows in small communities on flat or undulating

country, emergent from scrub or heath, on sand or sandy loam soil, often with gravel.  Associated species

include 

Allocasuarina campestris, Dryandra ashbyi, Calothamnus quadrifidus, Acacia sp., Hakea sp. and

Gastrolobium spinosum.

A detailed Management Program outlining strategies for management and conservation has been prepared

for this species (Sampson 

et al. 1990).  This is in the process of implementation, and conservation of the

species is being achieved through the good will and assistance of private landowners, local shires and

authorities.  During the course of implementation five new populations have been found in remnant

vegetation on private land.



Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Reserve



7.1993

13

Healthy



2.  SW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Reserve



7.1993

10

Healthy to moderate



3.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Shire Road Reserve



Private

1.6.1994


25

Moderate, declined

from 37 plants in

1985/86, 13 in

paddock

4.  NE of Watheroo



Mo

Shire Road Reserve

6.1993

9

Moderate, one plant



in poor condition,

weeds.


5.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private



1.6.1994

6

Healthy to moderate



6.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private



1.11.1992

1

-



77

7.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private


5.8.1993

29

Healthy,



regenerating from

fire, narrow strip of

uncleared bush

Populations Known in the Moora District (Cont'd)

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

8.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private


5.8.1993

26

Healthy, on narrow



strip of uncleared

bush


9.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private



5.8.1993

56

Healthy, on narrow



strip of uncleared

bush


10.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private



5.8.1993

5

Healthy, on narrow



strip of uncleared

bush


11.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private



5.8.1993

200+


Healthy

12.  W of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Reserve  15.11.1979



4

-

13.  E of Railway Road



Mo

Nature Reserve

Shire Road Reserve

1.6.1994


333

Healthy


14.  Carot Well Road

Mo

Shire Road Reserve



1.6.1994

1

Healthy



15.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private (propose



Nature Reserve)

6.1993


194

Most healthy, som

plants in poo

condition,

?senescence, insects

16.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Private (propose



Nature Reserve)

6.1993


160

Healthy


Response to Disturbance

A limited investigation on the effects of fire on seedling recruitment and vegetative regeneration (Sampson

1988) showed that 29 of 30 plants began coppicing at the onset of the first growing season after a moderate

April fire.  Some flowered two years after the fire.  There was little seedling recruitment and no seedlings

survived.  However, it is thought that this may be due to loss of seed by seed predators such as ants,

because the area that was burnt was small.  Observations at the site demonstrated that fire may have an

important role in the reproductive biology of

 E. rhodantha by stimulating the release of large amounts of

seed from the canopy.  In large natural stands this would satiate seed predators but allow enough seed to

remain, so that when other environmental conditions were favourable, seedling recruitment would occur.

It has been found that there was a substantial increasing in inbreeding in a remnant stand of 14 plants

isolated in land cleared for agriculture.  The level of outcrossing was significantly lower than that

determined for an uncleared stand (Sampson 1988).  Observations suggest that small remnants of



 E.

rhodantha are less fecund than the larger populations and the plants appear less vigorous.

As the plant is thought to be pollinated mainly by honey-eaters which use a variety of flowering species

occurring locally, weed invasion resulting in degradation of the habitat and loss of other native species may

affect pollination as well as the vigour of the plants themselves.  No damage or loss was observed of new

vegetative growth produced after a burn, when sheep were excluded from the area, but rabbits and

kangaroos still had access to the plants.  New shoots on plants where stock have been grazing are usually

stripped of leaves.

1   ...   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   ...   44




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