Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible.  However, dieback is known to kill some associated species which support

pollinators, whose presence is essential to the survival of 

E. rhodantha.

Management Requirements

-  Continuation of the required actions as outlined in the Management Program for E. rhodantha

(Sampson 

et al. 1990) and in the Recovery Plan (Kelly and Coates 1995).

-  Ensure that all road reserve populations have markers.

-  Maintain liaison with landowners/managers and local government authorities.

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Control weeds.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.

-  Investigate the possibility of land acquisition in the area of the largest population.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further investigation is required to determine whether increased inbreeding is associated with decreased

fitness.

-  Further survey is required on uncleared land at population 11.

-  Conduct research on fire response of the species.

References

Blakely 


et al. (1938), Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Kelly and Coates (1995), Kelly et al. (1995), Leigh et al.

(1984), Lucas and Synge (1978), McNee (1986), Napier 



et al. (1988a), Rye and Hopper (1981), Sampson

(1988), Sampson 



et al. (1990).

79

Eucalyptus suberea Brooker & Hopper

MYRTACEAE

Cork Mallee, Mount Lesueur Mallee

A mallee to 3 m tall or up to 6 m in older individuals, with thick, grey, corky, rough bark at the base of the

stem, which may be flaky, thicker and yellowish in larger specimens, and is smooth above.  The juvenile

leaves are lanceolate, olive green and slightly glossy.  The adult leaves are falcate to lanceolate, dark green,

slightly glossy and up to 9 x 1.5 cm.  They have sparse venation and numerous oil glands.  The adult leaves

are of the same colour on both surfaces.  The inflorescence may have from 11 to more than 20 buds.  It has

a peduncle up to 1.5 cm long.  The buds are smooth, club-shaped to broadly spindle-shaped up to 0.7 x 0.5

cm with a conical to hemispherical operculum.  The flowers are white, with all stamens fertile.  The fruits

are truncate-globose or rarely urn-shaped, with a thin rim and descending disc, 0.9 x 1.1 cm.  The seed is

D-shaped, brown and shining.



Eucalyptus suberea has no close relatives and is easily distinguished by the small truncate-globose fruits,

grey- yellow corky bark, many-flowered inflorescences and small, brown D-shaped seeds.



Flowering Period:  December-March

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from the Mt Lesueur to Coomallo Creek area, over a range of ca. 30 km, in seventeen small

populations.  Grows in open mallee communities over dense low heath, on or near lateritic breakaways and

the edges of mesas, with 



Eucalyptus lateritica, E. gittinsii, E. marginata, E. calophylla, E. accedens, E.

drummondii, E. exilis, E. pendens and other associated species including Hakea neurophylla, H. varia,

Banksia tricuspis, Daviesia epiphylla and Kingia australis.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  Warradarge

Co

Private


10.1984

39

-



2.  Coomallo

D

Nature Reserve



22.10.1984

30

-



3.  & 17. NE of Coomallo

Co

Private



28.2.1991

200+ (in 4 clumps)

Undisturbed

4.  NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



1.3.1983

3

-



5.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



24.5.1983

2

-



6.  Mt Peron

D

National Park



2.3.1983

-

-



7.  Mt Peron

D

National Park



2.3.1983

-

-



8.  NE of Mt Peron

D

National Park



2.3.1983

2

-



9.  NW of Mt Michaud

D

National Park



3.3.1983

7

-



10.  Mt Benia

D

Unvested Reserve



3.3.1983

1

-



11.  Coomallo

D

Nature Reserve



3.3.1983

10

-



12.  Coomallo

D

Private



3.7.1992

50

Disturbed



13.  Mt Michaud 

D

National Park



22.4.1982

3

-



14.  NW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.7.1979

1

-



15.  ENE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



20.9.1979

1

-



16.  Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



16.9.1976

-

-



80

Response to Disturbance

Populations 3 and 17 were last burnt in 1965-66.  One of these populations has had light sheep grazing with

apparently no effect.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Maintain liaison with landowners.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Resurvey populations 3 and 17 and obtain accurate location information with a Global Positioning

System.

-  Resurvey all populations in the Lesueur National Park and obtain Global Positioning System readings



for each.

-  Conduct research on the fire response of the species.



References

Brooker and Hopper (1986), Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Kelly 



et al. (1995), Napier et al. (1988a).

81

Gastrolobium appressum C.A.Gardner

FABACEAE


Scale-leaf Poison

Gastrolobium appressum was described in 1964 by C.A. Gardner who collected it first in 1957. It is a small

woody shrub up to 0.5 m high, with the young branches covered with fine, white hairs.  There are no

stipules at the base of the short leaf stalk.  The leaves are leathery, ending in a fine, sometimes hooked

point.  They are hairless, pale green, up to 1 cm long and 0.3 cm wide, borne in whorls of three or

sometimes four on plants in populations at the southern end of the range.  They are closely pressed against

the stem, often overlapping the next whorl so that the stem is hidden.  The flowers are borne above the

leaves in several whorls of three, clustered at the ends of the branchlets.  They are ca. 1 cm long, pea-

shaped, with a lobed, two-lipped calyx, with the three lobes of the lower lip, lanceolate and pointed at their

tips.  The petals are orange-yellow and reddish-purple.  The fruit is a hairy pod containing two hard seeds.

Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from a very restricted distribution in the Gunyidi District between Watheroo and Marchagee over a

range of ca. 25 km, with a single population ca. 20 km further east.  It has also been collected from Miling,

which is ca. 40 km to the south-east of the present known range of the species. It grows mainly on low,

quartzite gravel hills of the Coomberdale Chert formation, on a geological fault which runs approximately

north-south between Watheroo and Coorow.  It grows in quartz gravel and white or yellow sand on the

crowns and slopes of small gravel hills, in vegetation ranging from thicket to open low scrub, over low

heath to open dwarf scrub.  The plant communities in which it occurs are usually dominated by



Allocasuarina campestris, with Hakea sulcataActinostrobus pyramidalis, Allocasuarina drummondiana,

Grevillea integrifolia, Verticordia grandiflora, Melaleuca sp. and Acacia sp.

In 1983 the species was known from 10 collection sites recorded in the Western Australian Herbarium.  In

that year M. Burgman conducted a survey for the species and was unable to find three of those populations,

which were thought to have been destroyed by road works or agricultural clearing.  However, he found 7

new populations and a total of 2659 plants in 14 populations.  Since then one of these populations has been

destroyed.  A volunteer-based survey of rare 



Gastrolobium species carried out in 1989 and co-ordinated by

J. Sampson, found two small, new populations and relocated seven previously known populations.  It was

estimated that the total number of plants was still around 2000.  Since then a further road verge population

and one population on a nature reserve have been found.



Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  Near Gunyidi

Co

MRWA Road Reserve



17.10.1991

84

Partly disturbed, some



weed infestation

2.  N of Watheroo

Mo

MRWA Road Reserve



17.10.1991

49

Partly disturbed, some



weed infestation

82

3.  N of Watheroo

Mo

MRWA Road Reserve



17.10.1991

48

Undisturbed, some



weed infestation

4.  N of Watheroo

Mo

MRWA Road Reserve



Private

17.10.1991

29

Partly disturbed, some



weed infestation

5.  S of Marchagee

Co

Railway Reserve



Shire Road Reserve 

3.8.1989


30

Disturbed



Populations Known in the Moora District (Cont'd)

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

6.  NE of Gunyidi

Co

Private


12.11.1982

217


Population fenced

7.  S of Marchagee

Co

Railway Reserve



Shire Road Reserve

3.8.1989


57

Good


8.  S of Marchagee

Co

MRWA Road Reserve



Private

17.10.1991

200+

Partly disturbed, some



weed infestation,

fencing required

9.  W of Geraldton

Highway


Co

Shire Road Reserve

Private

17.10.1991



30

Partly disturbed, some

weed infestation,

fencing required, 100

plants in 1982

10.  S of Marchagee

Co

MRWA Road Reserve



17.10.1991

62

Partly disturbed, some



weed infestation

11.  S of Marchagee

Co

MRWA Road Reserve



Private

17.10.1991

122

Partly disturbed, some



weed infestation,

fencing required

12.  S of Marchagee

Co

MRWA Road Reserve



17.10.1991

200 est.


Partly disturbed, some

weed infestation, 1214

plants in 1982

13.  S of Marchagee

Co

Private


16.11.1982

36

14.  N of Marchagee Co



MRWA Road Reserve

17.10.1991

40 est.

Partly disturbed, some



weed infestation

15.  WNW of Gunyidi Co

Private

20.9.1983



30

Area quarried, partly

disturbed, fenced

16.  NW of Gunyidi

Co

MRWA Road Reserve



31.8.1989

1

Disturbed



17.  NE of Watheroo Mo

Shire Road Reserve

Private

16.8.1993



30 est.

Undisturbed, but on

very narrow verge

18.  Gunyidi

Mo

Nature Reserve



9.10.1992

-

-



1.*  Miling

Mo

-



21.11.1973

-

-



Response to Disturbance

G. appressum has been observed growing well in disturbed roadside soil, firebreaks and around gravel pits.

It is reported to be poisonous to stock but the species has not been tested for the presence of monofluoro-

acetate.  Plants growing on private land e.g. populations 9 and 11, are often short and bunched, with many

branches at ground level, indicating that the plant is grazed.  The species prefers open situations and

appears to be excluded from adjacent mid-dense stands of 

Allocasuarina spp.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



83

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  The species should be excluded from prescribed burning until response to fire is known.

-  Ensure that rare flora marker pegs are in place at all roadside and rail reserve populations.

-  Inspect populations annually, particularly those not inspected recently.

-  Maintain liaison with land owners and land managers.

-  Redetermine which of the populations on private land require fencing.

-  Investigate the possibility of acquisition of the railway/road reserve as a nature reserve.

-  Investigate the possibility of acquiring land adjacent to population 17 as a nature reserve as two other

species of Declared Rare Flora also occur there.

-  Carry out weed control where necessary.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements 

-  Conduct research on fire and life history.

-  Survey the uncleared private land adjacent to population 17, and reserves nearby for further

populations.

-  Complete full survey of population 18 and survey the nature reserve on which it occurs for further

populations.

-  Resurvey populations 6, 13 and 15, which have not been visited recently and establish which if any

require fencing.

-  Fence populations 8, 9 and 11.

References

Aplin (1973), Burgman (1983), Everist (1981), Gardner and Bennetts (1956), Gardner (1964), Leigh 



et al.

(1984), Rye and Hopper (1981), Sampson and Hopper (1989, 1990).



84

Gastrolobium hamulosum Meisn.

FABACEAE


Hook-point Poison

Gastrolobium hamulosum was found to be the most endangered of all the rare Gastrolobium species

surveyed in 1989 and was recommended for declaration as Rare in 1990 (Sampson and Hopper 1990).  It is

a small, erect, somewhat straggling shrub to 45 cm tall, with numerous slender branchlets covered with

short, white, conspicuous hairs.  The leaves are blue-green in colour, with conspicuous net veins and the

midrib raised beneath.  They are obovate in shape, with a wide, blunt tip which has a characteristic hooked

point.  They are arranged in whorls of three up the stems, not overlapping.  The flowers are arranged in

short racemes at the ends of the branches.  The calyx is silky hairy, with long hairs and has deeply divided

lobes which taper to long points.  The petals are golden yellow, streaked with red.  This species is similar to



G. parvifolium, but the latter differs in its crowded leaves which are not whorled, and in the glabrous calyx.

Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from the Wongan Hills in the Merredin District, and Calingiri in the Moora District over a

geographic range of ca. 40 km.  The population in the Moora District is of one plant on a railway reserve,

the populations in the Merredin District consist of one population on a road verge, and three populations on

a Department of Agriculture reserve.  The total number of plants known is 125.  The species has also been

recorded in the past from east of New Norcia, east of Carani and between Moora and Watheroo in the

Moora District.  It grows on pale yellowish clay-loam with some sand and gravel on clay flats, or white and

grey sand or sandy clay, sometimes in disturbed ground with other coloniser shrubs including 



Baeckea

crispifolia,  Gastrolobium calycinum, Mirbelia spinosa, or in low heath with Allocasuarina campestris,

Melaleuca spp, Eucalyptus sp. and tall sedges.  It has also been recorded from quartzite ridges.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. (2.) Calingiri

VP

Railway Reserve



10.9.1991

1

Disturbed and



weedy

3.*


148-149 mile peg,

Geraldton Highway

-

-

11.9.1964



-

-

4.*



Between Moora and

Watheroo


-

-

13.9.1932



-

-

5.*



10 miles E of New

Norcia


-

-

22.9.1955



-

-

6.*



5 miles E of Carani

-

-



16.9.1964

-

-



Response to Disturbance

G. hamulosum appears to be a colonizer, growing in disturbed areas and is probably killed by fire.  It

85

becomes excluded from weed infested road verges and may not tolerate canopy cover.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



86

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at the population.

-  Monitor the population regularly.

-  Install markers at the population.

-  It would be desirable to fence the single plant to prevent damage.

-  Maintain liaison with land managers.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.


-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required in suitable habitat within the known range and in the New Norcia, Carani and

Moora-Watheroo areas.

-  Conduct research on fire response and population biology.



References

Aplin (1973), Bentham (1864), Everist (1981), Gardner and Bennetts (1956), Leigh 



et al. (1984), Rye

(1980), Sampson and Hopper (1989, 1990).



87

Grevillea batrachioides F.Muell. ex McGill.

PROTEACEAE

Mt Lesueur Grevillea

This species was presumed extinct and was known only from a collection made by James Drummond until

an unidentified specimen collected by E.A. Griffin in 1982 was recognised by P. Olde as 

Grevillea

batrachioides.  The population from which the collection had been made was subsequently refound in

1991. 


It is an upright shrub to 1 m tall, with rounded hairy branchlets and stiff leaves, which are divided into 3-5

narrow lobes.  These may be further unequally divided.  The under surface of the leaf has spreading hairs

and is rolled under, leaving only the midrib exposed.  The leaves are ca. 1.5 cm long.  The flowers are

borne in simple inflorescences ca. 5 cm long at the ends of the branches, and are red in colour.  Each flower

has a pedicel 12-13 mm long.  The perianth is dilated at the base to 3.5-4 mm across, and is hairy on the

outside, with a few hairs on the inside.  The pistil is 37 mm long, hairy except at the base and the apex.

The ovary is also hairy.

G. batrachioides is related to G. asparagoides, which has shorter pedicels and longer leaves.  McGillivray

suggested that the treatment of



 G. batrachioides and G. maxwellii as subspecies of G. asparagoides would

also be an appropriate systematic treatment of these taxa (McGillivray 1993).



Flowering Period:  September-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from one population in the Lesueur area, where it occurs around flat sandstone outcrops in brown

sandy loam on north-west facing slopes below a breakaway.  It grows in dense heath with open woodland

of mallees and 



Banksia tricuspis.  Associated species include Dryandra armataHakea undulata, Daviesia

chapmanii, Conospermum nervosum and Diplopeltis sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  Lesueur

D

National Park



23 9.1992

10 est.


Good

Response to Disturbance

The area in which the population occurs was burnt 1985, and since the species was re-collected there in

1991, indicates that the plants must have regenerated from seed and/or resprouted since the fire.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

88

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at the population.

-  Monitor population regularly.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



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