Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Flowering Period:  Late September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

A rare but widespread species known from 23 small populations between Three Springs and Pinjarra, with

a single disjunct occurrence near Dumbleyung.  In the Moora District it is known from areas of low heath

on the lateritic tops of hills in 9 populations between Mt Lesueur and Eneabba.



Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey No. of Plants

Condition

5.

ENE of Mt Lesueur



-

Nature Reserve

1987

2

-



6.

NNE of Mt Lesueur

-

National Park



11.1987

5

Good



7a. SW of Warradarge Hill

-

National Park



1988

3

Good



7b. SW of Warradarge Hill

-

Private



-

0

Population



appears to have

been destroyed

8.

SSE of Coomaloo Hill



D

Nature Reserve

11.1992

0 (2 seen in 1989)



-

13. Robb Rd, N of Eneabba

TS

VCL


11.1991

10

Good



14. N of Eneabba

TS

VCL



11.1991

12+


Good

15.* ENE of Jurien

D

Nature Reserve



11.1991

0 (last seen in 1975) -

20.* NE of Mt Peron

-

National Park



10.1979

0 (last seen in 1975) -

23. Mt Lesueur

-

National Park



-

1

Good



Response to Disturbance

Fire does not affect plant if it occurs during its dormant period (December-April).  However, plants are

adversely affected if burnt during their growing period (May-November).  Susceptibility to weed invasion

is high, weeds competing with the plants, and grazing is also detrimental.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be low.



122

Management Requirements

-  Continue close liaison with landowners/managers and local authorities.

-  Monitor populations regularly to determine their conservation status.

-  Protect from fire, where possible, during the growing period.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Germplasm material should be collected for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora

Seed Centre at the Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further surveys should be carried out in areas of suitable habitat.



References

Hoffman and Brown (1992), Hopper 



et al. (1990), Lindley (1840), Patrick and Hopper (1982).

123

Verticordia albida A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

White Featherflower

This species was first collected in 1961 by F. Lullfitz and was described in 1991 by Alex George.  It is a

tall shrub to 2.6 m high, with leaves which are orbicular in shape and which have smooth margins.  They

are 2-4.5 mm wide.  The flowers are in dense spikes and are white with a pink centre.  The bracteoles are

persistent.  The sepals are 4-6 mm long with 10-13 plumose lobes, and with peltate, white, fringed basal

auricles covering the hypanthium.  The midrib of the sepal lobe is 0.1-0.2 mm wide.  The petals are 4-5 mm

long, almost orbicular in shape, with a fringe 1 mm long and with small basal auricles.  The anthers are

attached basally with a swollen filament apex, opening by slits.  The staminodes are entire, linear- subulate,

with prominent oil glands.  The style is 6-6.5 mm long, curved in the upper part with a beard of sparse hairs

0.5-0.7 mm long.

This species is related to 

Verticordia chrysostachys which occurs from Northampton to the Murchison

River.  It differs from that species in its flower colour (yellow in 



V. chrysostachys), the shorter, broader

petals, sparsely glandular stamens, style less curved and with sparse hairs surrounding the upper style.  



V.

albida hybridises with V. muelleriana, the hybrid having flowers varying from creamish-white to pale pink

or dark pink on separate plants or on the same plant.



Flowering Period:  Late November-January

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known currently from three populations, less than 2 km apart, south-west of Three Springs.  The species

has been recorded in the past from near Eneabba and from another locality west of Coorow.  It grows on

white-grey to yellow sand over gravel in scrub or thicket to 3 m.  Associated species include 



Banksia

prionotes, Callitris sp., Eucalyptus todtiana and Jacksonia sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road



Reserve, Private

10.8.1994

250

Partly cleared to



improve visibility on

corner, some plants

regenerating three

years later

2.  Three Springs to

Eneabba Road

TS

MRWA Road



Reserve

10.8.1994

20+

Partly cleared by



road works

1.* W of Coorow

Co

-

15.1.1967



-

Not refound in 1992

1.  Sweetman Road

TS

Shire Road



Reserve

3.1.1995


10

Undisturbed

1.* Eneabba

-

-



17.12.1962

-

-



2.* Eelya Park

Ca

-



10.12.1966

-

This area cleared



Response to Disturbance

124

Several plants regenerated at population 1 about three years after it had been partially cleared.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  The road verge populations need to be monitored, particularly for disease.

-  Maintain liaison with landowner and local authority.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until response is known.

-  Control weeds at road verge populations.

-  Investigate the possibility of land acquisition.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly between Three Springs to Eneabba and Alexander Morrison

National Park.

-  Conduct research on the population biology and fire response of the species.

-  Consider establishment of the species in a conservation reserve.

References

George (1991).



125

Wurmbea tubulosa Benth.

COLCHICACEAE

Long-flowered Nancy

This species was described in 1878 by George Bentham from material collected at Champion Bay, which is

now part of the town of Geraldton.

Wurmbea tubulosa is a small plant 1-3 cm tall, with an ellipsoid corm to 2.5 cm long.  There are three

leaves, the lower two are basal and similar in length and width, without a distinct section of stem between

their bases. They are very broad, 3-22 mm wide, lanceolate in shape, held flat to the ground.  The upper

leaf is smaller and erect, emerging from the two lower leaves or attached to the stem just above them.  The

flowers are either male or female, borne on separate plants.  There are 1-16 flowers in the inflorescence.

The male flowers are in an open inflorescence which is taller than the uppermost leaf, whereas the female

flowers are in a dense inflorescence which is almost concealed between the two basal leaves at ground

level.  The perianth is 6-7 mm long in male flowers, 9-12 mm in female flowers, white to pale pink in

colour and joined at the base into a long tubular section, for about half the perianth length.  The upper

section of the perianth is divided into six equal lobes, each having a single nectary, which is a narrow,

curved mauve pink band, situated a third to a half the distance from the base of the lobe, and slightly raised.

There are six stamens in the male flowers and a superior ovary with three styles in the female flowers.  The

fruit is a capsule with spherical, smooth, brown seeds.

This species differs from all other Western Australian species in that the perianth is tubular for up to half its

length.  

W. drummondii is a related species but differs in that the perianth is united into a tube for up to a

quarter of its length.  It also differs in the smaller flowers, which are fewer in each flower head.



Flowering Period:  June-July

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Until survey work was undertaken in the Moora District, this species was known from five populations in

the Geraldton District, two from west of Mingenew (populations 3 and 4 ), another from east of Mingenew

(population 5) and two north of Dongara (populations 1 and 2).  However, in 1991 a sixth was found east of

Dongara in the Moora District.  More recently two populations have been found further to the south-east.

One is within the Moora District to the north of Three Springs, the other at Yandanooka.  The plants in both

these populations appeared smaller than is typical for the species, but is thought to be a result of poor

growth in a dry season.  They appear to be almost intermediate with 



W. drummondii.  The geographic range

for the species is ca. 100 km, but the type location at Champion Bay is ca. 35 km further north.



W. tubulosa  grows in clay and sandy clay, clay loam or brown loam under shrubs on riverbanks, along

drainage lines and in seasonally wet places in woodland of



 Eucalyptus loxophleba with an open shrub layer

including 



Acacia and Hakea species beneath.  This species appears to be variable in the number of plants

that are seen at a particular population from one year to another, possibly depending on good rainfall.



Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition


126

6.  E of Dongara

I

MRWA Road Reserv



Railway Reserve

7.8.1992


100+

Some plants

growing on well-

used track,

population with

weed infestation

7.  Yandanooka

Mi

Townsite Reserve



11.6.1991

1000+


Undisturbed

8.  N of Three Springs

TS

Shire or MRWA



Gravel Reserve

23.8.1993

1000 est.

Undisturbed



Response to Disturbance

Unknown. Plants at population 6 were growing on a well-used, compacted track with little other vegetation.

There were few plants in the areas adjacent to the track, which were heavily weed infested.  A large

population in the Geraldton District had been grazed for many years until shortly before its discovery.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Consider weed control at population 6.

-  Maintain liaison with managers of land on which the populations occur.

-  Efforts should be made to acquire the townsite reserve on which population 7 occurs as a conservation

reserve.


-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required for this small and inconspicuous species, particularly in suitable habitat in the

Geraldton District.

-  Reassess the conservation status of the species after fieldwork has been completed for the Rare Flora

Management Program for the Geraldton District.

References

Bentham (1878), Macfarlane (1980, 1987), Patrick and Hopper (1982).



127

B.

Presumed Extinct Taxa

Calothamnus accedens Hawkeswood

MYRTACEAE



Calothamnus accedens was described in 1984, when it was known from one population of 14 plants found

in 1980 on a narrow road verge near Piawaning on the western side of the Merredin District.



C. accedens is a slender, erect and much-branched shrub to 1.8 m tall.  The leaves are densely crowded at

the ends of the branches, which have prominent leaf and bud scars lower down.  The leaves are sessile, stiff

and linear, 10-15 mm long, 0.8-1 mm wide, with long, spreading, whitish hairs which are shed on the older

leaves.  The flowers are grouped 4-10 in short clusters, usually on one side of the stem but sometimes

almost encircling it, on the lower parts of the stem from which the leaves have fallen.  The calyx tube is

bell-shaped, densely hairy at the base, the hairs shorter and less dense higher up.  There are five narrow

petals to 7 mm long, orange-brown in colour, and five equal staminal claws, 20-25 mm long, pinkish-red to

dark crimson in colour.  They have 15-19 filaments on each claw, the anthers are 1-1.5 mm long.  The fruit

are depressed globular to cylindrical, with five short lobes which wear away with age.  They are 5-6 mm

long, 6.2-8 mm wide, densely hairy at first.  The seeds are 1.5-2 mm long, dark or chocolate brown in

colour.

This species is closely related to 



C. brevifolius, which differs in its shorter height, to 0.5 m tall, with

slightly narrower, less hairy leaves and flower clusters on leafy parts of the stems, and with 1-5 smaller

flowers with shorter anthers in each flower cluster. 

 C. brevifolius has hairs on the calyx tube which are

thicker, less spreading and less than 1 mm long, and its fruits are smaller, with smaller, brown seeds.



Calothamnus accedens also has close affinities to C. hirsutus,  which is a shorter shrub to 1 m tall and

which has longer leaves 20-25 mm long, flower clusters on leafy stems with 4-8 flowers in each cluster, 20-

25 stamen filaments on each staminal claw, shorter anthers, narrower fruits, 5-6 mm wide and smaller

seeds, 0.7-1 mm long, dark grey in colour.

The three species are thought to be closely related and there is some overlap in several of these characters.

Flowering Period:  February

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The population from which the species was described, occurred just east of the Moora District to the east of

Piawaning, in the Merredin District, but has since been destroyed by roadworks.  Specimens from

Watheroo, Three Springs and the Lesueur area closely approach 



C. accedens and C. hirsutus but cannot be

assigned to either species with certainty.  These have been given the phrase name 



Calothamnus sp. Lesueur

(E.A.Griffin 2490) [aff. 



hirsutus].  Further collections are needed, with study in the field and further

taxonomic work to clarify the status of these populations.  At the original population, 



C. accedens grew in

sandy soil over laterite, on a road verge with remnant heathland vegetation including 



Melaleuca scabra and

Acacia sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora, Presumed Extinct



Response to Disturbance

The population when last seen was surviving on a road verge infested with “grassy weeds”.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

128

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Populations of C. sp. Lesueur (E.A.Griffin 2490) [aff. hirsutus] need to be protected from disturbance

or possible loss, at least until the status of this taxon has been clarified.

Research Requirements 

-  Further collections should be made, with further study in the field and taxonomic work to clarify the

status of 

C. sp. Lesueur (E.A.Griffin 2490) [aff. hirsutus] and its relationship to C. accedens

References

E. Griffin (personal communication), Hawkeswood (1984a, 1984b).



129

Lasiopetalum rotundifolium Paust

STERCULIACEAE

This species is known only from the type collections made in 1947 by C.A. Gardner and from collections

made by Drummond last century.  It was described in 1974, the specific name referring to the rounded

leaves.

Lasiopetalum rotundifolium is an erect shrub to at least 40 cm tall, with branchlets with stellate and simple

hairs.  The leaves are alternate, on stalks 10-20 mm long, the blade 7-35 mm long and 9-30 mm wide.

They are deeply wrinkled and almost circular in shape, with lobes above the point of attachment of the

stalk, giving a deep heart shape.  They have a close covering of grey, stellate hairs on the lower surface,

and are hairless on the upper surface.  The inflorescence is compact, with a straight main axis, 20-40 mm

long with ca. 8 flowers.  There is one ovate bracteole below each flower, distant from the calyx, which is

pink, 6 mm long, tomentose on the outside and divided nearly to the base into 5 ovate lanceolate lobes.

The petals are absent.  There are five maroon anthers and the style has large, white, reflexed, stellate hairs.



L. rotundifolium is closely related to L. molle, which occurs between Perenjori and Newdegate and has

ovate, less cordate leaves.



Flowering Period:  September-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The specimens collected by James Drummond are without precise locality information.  The locality south

of New Norcia has been searched without success, during this survey and in 1982 (Millar 1982).  There are

no habitat details recorded for the species but the locality south of New Norcia has been partially cleared.

Much of the area was originally wandoo woodland.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora, Presumed Extinct

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* S of New Norcia

VP

-

1.10.1947



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown, but thought to be high.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Research Requirements 

-  Further survey should be conducted for the species particularly in conservation areas south of New

                                                     

#

 now extant Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



130

Norcia in conjunction with survey for the two undescribed species of 



Thomasia  (“New Norcia” and

“Green Hill”) which are poorly known, listed as Priority 1 and have been recorded from the same area.



References

Leigh 


et al. (1984), Millar (1982) Paust (ca. 1973, 1974).

131

Leucopogon marginatus W.Fitzg.

EPACRIDACEAE



Leucopogon marginatus was originally collected from sandplains, at Arrino in September 1903 by W.V.

Fitzgerald.  It is an erect shrub 45-60 cm tall, with alternate leaves which are erect, the margins often curled

round the stem, ovate to ovate lanceolate in shape, with crisped, membranous margins and with a pungent

point.  The leaves are concave and striate in the lower half, 4-6 mm long and almost sessile, with a very

short stalk.  The flowers are in groups of one to three in the axils of the upper leaves.  Each flower has

bracteoles at the base as third as long as the sepals, rounded with membranous margins.  The five sepals are

broadly lanceolate.  The flower is white, joined at the base to form a tube just longer than the calyx.  The

five free lobes are bearded on the inside, but with acute, hairless tips.  The anthers are oblong, attached near

the top of the tube, and are without sterile tips.  The style is barely longer than the petal tube.

Allied to



 L. obtectus and L. crassiflorus, differing from the former in the foliage, which does not have a

mucronate tip and from the latter in the inflorescence, in which the peduncles are 1-2 flowered.  It is also

similar to

 L. amplectans, which has sterile tips to the anthers.

Flowering Period:  July-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The species has not been refound in the Moora District since the type collection was made at Arrino in

1903, in the north-east of the District.  It was recorded as growing on sandplain.  However, six populations

of a 


Leucopogon species were found on road verges in the Merredin District and one other in the Esperance

District in 1990 by F. Mollemans who identified them as 



L. marginatus but was not able to confirm his

identification with J.M. Powell, who is working on a revision of the genus 



Leucopogon (Mollemans et al.

1993).  These specimens have recently been confirmed as this species.



Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora, Presumed Extinct

#



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