Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District


Populations Known in the Moora District



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Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Near Arrino

?TS

-

9.1903



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Research Requirements 

-  Further survey is required, particularly in the Arrino area.

                                                     

#

 now extant Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



132

References 

Blackall and Grieve (1991), Fitzgerald (1904), Mollemans 



et al. (1993).

133

Menkea draboides (Hook.f.) Hook.f. ex Benth.

BRASSICAEAE

This species was collected by James Drummond in 1843 and since then has been collected only three times.

It was originally described and illustrated by Hooker as 



Stenopetalum draboides.

Menkea draboides is a prostrate, spreading herb, with hairless stems to 60 cm long.  The basal leaves are

obovate, entire or with a few lobes or teeth.  They are ca. 3 cm long and ca. 10 mm wide, the blade

narrowing to a slender stalk almost as long as the blade.  The stem leaves become smaller, higher up the

stems.  The flowers are white, borne in dense, few-flowered inflorescences.  There are four sepals and

petals.  The latter are ca. 3 mm long, with a broad blade narrowing to a linear claw.  There are six stamens,

a papillose ovary and short style.  The seed pod is flattened and dry, splitting down two sides, leaving a

central partition.  It is often twisted and the valves are papillose.  The seeds are dark red-brown in colour.

Differs from other species of 



Menkea in the twisted, papillose seed pod.

Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Apart from two collections made in the Moora District, the species has also been found in 1889 at Yilgarn

near Southern Cross in the Merredin District.  The collection made by Drummond is without location

information.  Of the collections made in the Moora District, there is some doubt as to whether the

collection from the rabbit proof fence (ca. 50 km east of Watheroo) was made from that area, which is on

the border with the Merredin District or from Wooroloo, which is north-east of Perth in the Swan Region.

Recent taxonomic study has brought to light five collections of this species, from north of Meekatharra in

1986, and in 1980 from north of Paynes Find, Woodline and north-east of Norseman.

It grows in clay or red loam over granite, or in granitic loamy sand, in wet places including drainage lines

and at Woodline with samphire on the margin of a salt lake (B. Lepschi,



 personal communication).

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora, Presumed Extinct

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Watheroo

Mo

-

9.1905



-

-

2.* Watheroo, Rabbit Proof Fence



Mo

-

8.1905



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Research Requirements 

                                                     

#

 now extant listed Priority 3 (updated at December 1999)



134

-  Further survey for the species is required, particularly to refind and survey areas where recent

collections have been made.

References 

Bentham (1863), Hewson (1982), Hooker (1844), Leigh 



et al. (1984), Mueller (1861), Shaw (1970).

135

Platysace dissecta (Benth.) C.Norman

APIACEAE


Dissected Platysace

This species is known from one collection made by James Drummond, between the Moore and Murchison

Rivers last century.  It was described by Bentham in 1866 as 

Siebera dissecta, and the new combination

was made by Norman in 1939.



Platysace dissecta is an upright plant to 0.3 m tall with leafy stems and sturdy, widely spreading branches.

The leaves are divided two or three times into narrow, tapering lobes.  The flowers are arranged in compact

umbels on stout stalks, with many flowers in each umbel.  The fruit are as long as broad, smooth, slightly

swollen in the centre of the carpels, flat on the dorsal edge, with fine intermediate ribs.  It is thought that 



P.

dissecta is a leafy variant of P. juncea (B. Rye, personal communication).

Flowering Period:  Unknown

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The species has been recorded from between the Moore and Murchison Rivers and could therefore occur in

the Moora and/or Geraldton Districts.  There are no recorded details of habitat.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora, Presumed Extinct

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire 

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Between Moore and

Murchison Rivers 

?

-



Pre 1866

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Research Requirements 

-  The type collection needs to be examined, particularly the fruits, to clarify the relationship of the taxon

with

 P. juncea.

References

Bentham (1866), Blackall and Grieve (1980), Norman (1939).

                                                     

#

 now synonymised with 



P. juncea

1

A. Priority One Taxa

Acacia carens Maslin

MIMOSACEAE

First collected in 1973 by Charles Chapman

Acacia carens is an open broom-like shrub up to 0.6

m tall.  The terete green branches have yellow ribs.  The phyllodes are continuous with the

branches and are reduced to rudimentary stipule-like appendages 0.5 mm long, or to minute

phyllodes 1-2 mm long.  The peduncles are densely hairy, 2-5 mm long.  The flower heads are

globular, 8 mm in diameter.  The legumes are linear and curved, to 10 cm long, ca. 4 mm wide.

This species, when originally collected, was identified as 



A. volubilis which has tortuous stems

and which also differs in phyllode and calyx characters.  It has also been confused with 



A.

cumminghamia which differs in its longer peduncles and in other characters of the flowers and

legumes.  The reduced phyllodes of this species are alluded to in the specific name, which is

derived from the Latin 

carens, meaning lacking.

Flowering Period:  April-May

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

A. carens is endemic to the Moora District and has been collected in the past over a geographic

range of about 15 km in the Gairdner Range, but is known at present from three populations with

a range of less than 10 km.  Two of these populations are on road verges, the other population of

only four plants, is located within a national park.  It has been reported from over 30 locations in

the Lesueur National Park (E. Griffin, personal communication).

This species grows on uplands of lateritic gravel or sandy gravel in low heath, or in open low

woodland and low scrub.  Associated species include 

Eucalyptus drummondii, E. calophylla and

Daviesia species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey No. of Plants

Condition

1a. E of Greenhead

Co

Shire Road Reserve 1.5.1991



30

Partly


disturbed

1b. E of Greenhead

Co

Shire Road Reserve 1.5.1991



9

Disturbed

2.

Pen Road


Co

Shire Road Reserve 1.5.1991

147

Disturbed



3.* ENE of Mt Peron Co

National Park

24.10.1979 -

-

4.* NW of Mt Peron ?Co



?National Park

28.9.1990

4

-

5.* Cockleshell Gully  D



National Park  

28.5.1973

Locally common-WH -

Response to Disturbance


2

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Survey required.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in the Lesueur National Park, to resurvey populations

2-4, and confirm further populations.

References

Maslin (1995).



3

Acacia chapmanii R.S.Cowan & Maslin

MIMOSACEAE

subsp.

 australis R.S.Cowan & Maslin ms

This taxon has been collected only four times, originally in 1971, by S. Paust.

It is a low dense shrub to 50 cm tall.  The phyllodes are terete, pungent and 8-nerved, 2-3 mm or

to 5 mm long, ascending and gently recurved.  The peduncles are 12-19 mm long, and the yellow,

globular flower heads are 24-27 flowered and are 5 mm in diameter.  The legumes and seeds are

not known.



Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs in the Bolgart area.  A recently surveyed population of 400 plants occurs on a nature

reserve just outside the southern boundary of the Moora District, but the taxon was recorded in

1971 and 1972 from between Bolgart and Calingiri and from north of Wyening in the south-

eastern corner of the District.  The geographic range is ca. 17 km.

Grows in sand, sandy gravel or sandy clay with laterite in open low woodland over low heath,

sometimes in winter wet areas.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* N of Wyening

VP

-

15.9.1972



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



4

References

B. Maslin (personal communication).



5

Acacia cochlocarpa Meisn. subsp. cochlocarpa ms

MIMOSACEAE

This subspecies is restricted to the Watheroo area and there is also an early collection from near

Moora.  It was first collected by James Drummond from "Swan River" and "between Moore and

Murchison Rivers" and was described by Meissner in 1855.  Diels made a collection in 1901

"westward from Moora" and subsequent collections have been made from the Watheroo area.



Acacia cochlocarpa subsp. cochlocarpa ms is a sprawling, glabrous shrub to 0.7 m tall with

slightly flexuose branchlets.  The phyllodes are linear to narrowly elliptic, 3-7.5 cm long, 3-6 mm

wide, incurved and erect, with 7 nerves per face.  The flower heads are golden, sessile and

cylindrical, 7-10 mm long.  The legumes are tightly coiled, 3-4 mm wide.

This taxon is similar to 

A. alocophylla, which has 8-nerved phyllodes, and to A. tetraneura which

has 4-nerved phyllodes and bracteoles exserted on the buds.  



A. cochlocarpa subsp. velutinosa ms

occurs near Manmanning and differs in its shorter phyllodes, velutinous branchlets, phyllodes and

legumes, and in its smaller, oblongoid flower heads.

Flowering Period:  June-July

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been recorded in the past over a range of ca. 20 km north of Watheroo but most of these

roadside populations appear to have been lost.  Only two populations have been surveyed recently

in this area and these grow within a kilometre of each other.  The population known from an early

collection made from west of Moora has not been refound.  This is some 45 km south of the main

range of the species.

Grows mainly in disturbed roadside situations on sand, or clayey sand with laterite in open

shrubland.  Associated species include 



Allocasuarina campestris.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.  N of Watheroo

Mo

Private



17.10.1991

38

In cleared weed



infested paddock

2.  N of Watheroo

Mo

MRWA Road



Reserve

17.10.1991

13

Disturbed and weed



infested

1.* W of Moora

-

-

12.6.1901



-

-

2.* S of Marchagee



Co

-

15.6.1974



-

-

3.* N of Watheroo



-

-

18.7.1962



-

-

Response to Disturbance

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



6

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Further survey.

-  Ensure that road verge population is marked.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

B. Maslin (personal communication), Meisner (1855).



7

Acacia congesta Benth. subsp. cliftoniana (W.Fitzg.) Maslin ms

MIMOSACEAE

This taxon was originally described in 1904 by W.V. Fitzgerald as 

Acacia cliftoniana but is now

included by B. Maslin (personal communication) as a subspecies of 



A. congesta.    It  was  first

collected in 1903 by Fitzgerald from Arrino.



A. congesta subsp.  cliftoniana ms is a low shrub 0.5-1 m tall, with hirsute branchlets and

phyllodes.  The phyllodes are 5-10 mm long, 1.2-2.5 mm wide.  The flower heads are globular to

shortly oblongoid, 30-40 flowered.  The legumes are constricted between the seeds and are 4-5

mm wide.  This subspecies is somewhat similar to 



A. idiomorpha which has more undulate

phyllodes, with a convex abaxial margin, and there are differences in the calyx, petals and

legumes.  It is also similar to 

A. paradoxa which has acute or obtuse phyllodes and more

prominent stipules.  



A. congesta subsp. congesta has longer glabrous phyllodes, and flower heads

which may have more flowers and which may be arranged in racemes.  



A. congesta subsp.

wonganensis occurs only in the Wongan Hills area.  It has glabrous phyllodes and flower heads

arranged in racemes.



Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been collected in the past from Yandanooka, which is just north of the boundary of the

Moora District to near Three Springs, a geographic range of ca. 25 km.  It is at present known

from three road verge populations south of Arrino with a range of 2.3 km.

Grows on lateritic gravel and brown loam in open scrub beneath open low woodland

communities.  Associated species include 



Eucalyptus wandoo and A. flabellifolia.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1. S of Arrino

TS

MRWA Road Reserve 10.7.1991



5 est.

Good


2. S of Arrino

TS

MRWA Road Reserve 10.7.1991



2+

Disturbed

3. S of Arrino

TS

MRWA Road Reserve 10.7.1991



4

Disturbed and

weedy, all plants

partly dead 

4.*Yandanooka

Mi

-



19.9.1904

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


8

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required particularly in suitable habit on conservation reserves in the Arrino

to Yandanooka area.

References

Fitzgerald (1904), B. Maslin (personal communication).



9

Acacia flabellifolia W.Fitzg.

MIMOSACEAE

This species was first collected by W.V. Fitzgerald in 1903 from Arrino and was described by

him in 1904. 

A spreading shrub to 1 m tall, 

Acacia flabellifolia has rigid, undulate phyllodes ending in a long,

pungent point.  The upper margin is rounded and the principal nerve runs close to the lower

margin.  The flower heads are globular and solitary and the legumes are tightly coiled.

A. dilatata is a species with similar phyllodes, and occurs within the range of A. flabellifolia, but

is not closely related.



Flowering Period:  August

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been recorded as occurring between Yandanooka and Watheroo, a geographic range of just

over 100 km and it is at present known from four populations occurring between Arrino and

Watheroo. 

It grows in rocky or lateritic loam on low hills in open eucalypt woodland.  Associated species

include 


Eucalyptus wandoo and E. loxophleba.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey No. of Plants Condition

1.

North of Watheroo



Mo 

-

19.8.1973



-

-

2a.* SE of Arrino



TS

MRWA Road

Reserve

10.7.1991



2+

Good


2b. SE of Arrino

TS

MRWA Road



Reserve

10.7.1991

4

Weed invaded,



some plants

dead


3a. SW of Three Springs TS

Nature Reserve

10.7.1991

10+


Good

3b. SW of Three Springs TS

Nature Reserve

22.10.1992 10+

Undisturbed

4.

SW of Watheroo



Mo

Private


16.10.1991 40 est.

Undisturbed

5.* Yandanooka

Mi

-



14.9.1904

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


10

Management Requirements

-  Survey required.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required in the area of population 4, to obtain accurate location information

and to determine whether a further population occurs nearby.

-  Further survey required, particularly on the eastern side of Watheroo National Park to refind

population 1 and on the Yandanooka townsite, population 5.

References

Fitzgerald (1904), B. Maslin (personal communication).



11

Acacia lanceolata Maslin ms

MIMOSACEAE

This species was first collected by Blackall in 1940 from Three Springs.

Acacia lanceolata ms is a much-branched shrub to 1 m tall.  The branchlets are spinose, with

lanceolate phyllodes, 7-13 mm long and 1.5-4 mm wide, each with a pungent point.  The flower

heads are globular to shortly oblongoid and the legumes are tightly coiled.

Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been collected from Arrino northwards into the Geraldton District east of Mingenew.  Two

populations have been located recently but as the species was not included on the Priority Flora

List until late during this survey, no others have been found.

Grows on low hills, usually on laterite, in eucalypt woodland or tall shrubland of 

Allocasuarina

species.



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