Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey No. of Plants

Condition

1.* N of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road



Reserve

30.8.1982

Moderately

common-WH

Uncommon in

adjacent disturbed

woodland

1.  NE of Arrino

TS

-

2.12.1991



Common-WH Undisturbed

2.  W of Three Springs TS

Nature Reserve 26.7.1994

-

-



1.* NW of Three Springs TS

Road Reserve

22.11.1983 Common-WH Disturbed

Response to Disturbance

It was noted that population 1 was common on the road verge but not in adjacent undisturbed

vegetation.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

12

-  Further survey is required, particularly to survey fully populations 2 and 3 and to resurvey

populations 1 and 4. 

References

B. Maslin (personal communication).



13

Acacia nodiflora Benth.

MIMOSACEAE

This species was first collected by James Drummond from "Swan River" and later described from

these collections by Bentham in 1855.  The next collection of the species was made by W.E.

Blackall in 1940 and only four collections were made subsequently until it was surveyed in 1991.

Acacia nodiflora is a diffuse shrub to 2 m tall.  The phyllodes are grouped in bundles, with up to

seven phyllodes in each.  They are linear to narrowly oblong, 7-13 mm long, 0.5-1.5 mm wide.

There is a pair of spiny stipules at each cluster of phyllodes.  The flower heads are globular to

widely ellipsoid, golden in colour and 5-7 mm in diameter.  They are borne on peduncles 1-2 cm

long and are grouped 1-3 per node.  The legumes are up to 6.5 cm long, 7-8 mm wide.

Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known from east of Carnamah north to the boundary of the Moora District south-

west of Morawa over a range of ca. 40 km.  Eight populations have been reported from the

Inering Creek Catchment, which is within the known range of the species.  These are not listed

below.

Grows amongst laterite, chert or granite rocks on low hills, in brown loam or clay soils.  Occurs



in open low scrub and associated species include species of 

Melaleuca,  Acacia  and

Allocasuarina.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey No. of Plants Condition

1.  SW of Morowa  -

Telstra Reserve

25.9.1990

24

Partly disturbed



2.  SW of Morowa -

-

16.8.1990



-

-

3.  E of Carnamah TS



Shire Road Reserve 19.9.1991

15

Disturbed, weed



invasion

4.  E of Carnamah TS

Shire Road Reserve 19.9.1991

20

Disturbed



5.  E of Carnamah TS

Shire Road Reserve 19.9.1991

30+

Disturbed, weed



invasion

6.  N of Carnamah TS

Shire Road Reserve 19.9.1991

100+


Disturbed, weed

invasion


7.  N of Carnamah TS

Shire Road Reserve 19.9.1991

5

Disturbed, weed



invasion

1.* E of Carnamah TS

-

28.9.1990



-

-

2.* SW of Morowa Ca



-

1.9.1976


-

-

Response to Disturbance



14

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that markers are in place at all road verge populations.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in the Inering Creek Catchment, to obtain voucher

specimens and population information for the populations reported from that area.

References

Bentham (1855), B. Maslin (personal communication).



15

Acacia vittata R.S.Cowan & Maslin ms 

MIMOSACEAE

Lake Logue Wattle

This undescribed species was first collected in 1981.  It is a dense rounded shrub to 4 m tall.  The

branchlets are longitudinally striped alternately with hairless, often green epidermis and brown

pubescent bands.  The phyllodes are narrowly oblong elliptic, to 5.5 cm long, and 7 mm wide.

They are stiff and have raised nerves.  The flower heads are golden in colour and globular in

shape.  The legumes are up to 4 cm long, 4-5 mm wide.



Flowering Period:  July-August

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species occurs near Eneabba and has been recorded from two localities 40 km apart.

It grows on sand and clay-loam soils, on the margins of seasonal lakes in open low forest or low

woodland.  Associated species include C



asuarina obesa, Melaleuca sp. and Hibiscus sp.  It has

also been recorded growing in sandy loam on limestone in mallee scrub heath at the northerly

populations.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.* SW of Eneabba

Ca

-



25.2.1981

-

-



1.  SW of Eneabba

Ca

?Stockroute Reserve



27.8.1992

10,000+


Undisturbed

1.* Arrowsmith

I

-

3.7.1985



-

-

1.  SW of Eneabba



Ca

?Stockroute Reserve

27.8.1992

100+


Undisturbed

2.  SW of Eneabba

Ca

?Stockroute Reserve



27.8.1992

100+


Undisturbed

3.  Arrowsmith

I

?Rail Reserve



2.7.1992

1

Partly



disturbed

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Confirm land status for all populations and inform land managers where necessary.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements


16

-  Further survey is required, particularly to establish the full extent of populations 4 and 5 and to

obtain accurate grid references.

-  Populations 1 and 3 need to be refound and fully surveyed.



References

B. Maslin (personal communication).



17

Andersonia longifolia (Benth.) L.Watson

EPACRIDACEAE



Andersonia longifolia was first collected by Drummond and later described by Bentham in 1869

as 


A. latiflora var. longifolia.  It was recognised as a distinct species by L. Watson in 1962.  There

have been only five subsequent collections of the species, one last century by Gilbert, the others

between 1979 and 1989.

A. longifolia is an erect shrub to 50 cm tall.  The leaves are grey in colour, up to 17 mm long and

1-5 mm broad at the base.  They are undulate and twisted, with long tapering tips which are

spreading or incurved.  The inflorescences are oblong and terminal, usually with more than 20

flowers in each.  The bracts in the lower part of the inflorescence are leaf-like and may be longer

than the flowers.  The calyx is 10-15 mm long and is longer than the corolla, which is white and

has lobes as long as, or longer than the tube.  It is shortly hairy inside the tube and on the lower

part of the lobes.  The anthers are linear-oblong in shape and are equal to or exceeding the

filaments, which are hairless on the external surface and densely hairy on the inner surface.



Flowering Period:  March-May

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The earliest two collections of this species are without locality information but it is likely that

they are from the Lesueur area, from which the other collections have been made.  The species

has been found over a narrow geographic range of only ca. 6 km.

It has been recorded growing in low open heath and shrubland on upland or slopes beneath

breakaways of Lesueur sandstone, in grey sand, grey-brown sandy gravel or sandy loam soils. 



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Conditio

n

1.* NW of Mt Lesueur



D

National Park

22.11.1979

-

-



2.* NE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



22.4.1989

-

-



3.* S of Mt Peron

D

National Park



21.5.1981

Locally common-WH -



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

18

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Bentham (1869), Watson (1962).



19

Arnocrinum gracillimum Keighery

ANTHERICACEAE



Arnocrinum gracillimum is known from four collections made in the Eneabba area, the first

collected by Royce in 1962.  It was described by Keighery in 1987.

This species is a perennial herb, with a short creeping rhizome covered in dense woolly hairs.

The leaves are linear, 20-40 mm long, with sheathing bases, arising from the rhizome.  The

flowering stems are up to 35 cm long, with many short, sterile side branches.  The flowers are

borne in terminal condensed spikes.  Each flower has six purple perianth segments and is ca. 20

mm in diameter.

Differs from 



A. drummondii and A. preissii in the presence of numerous, short, sterile branchlets

on the flowering stems.



Flowering Period:  October-November

Fruiting Period:  November-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is endemic to the Moora District in the Eneabba to Badgingarra area.

It grows on lateritic grey sandy soils in low scrub or heath.  Associated species at population 1

included 



Adenanthos cygnorum, Calothamnus quadrifidus, Hakea obliqua and Xanthorrhoea sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.  S of Greenhead Road Co

MRWA Road

Reserve


6.11.1992

27

Partly



disturbed

2.  SSE of Cervantes

D

-

22.11.1992



-

-

3.  Coomallo



D

Nature Reserve

6.11.1988

-

-



1.* N of Badgingarra

D

-



3.11.1962

-

-



2.* SSE of Eneabba

Co

-



17.10.1978

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

20

-  Ensure that markers are in position at population 1.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind and fully survey populations 2, 3 4 and 5, and

to refind within the Badgingarra National Park.

References

Keighery (1987).



21

Chorizema humile Turcz.

FABACEAE


Chorizema humile is a small, prostrate shrub to ca. 60 cm diameter.  The leaves are alternate,

obovate and mucronate at the apex, 4-16 x 2.5-5 mm, tapering at the base into a short petiole,

which has a pair of persistent stipules ca. 1 mm long.  There are terminal racemes to 18 cm long

with up to 30 flowers on pedicels to 2.5 mm long.  The calyx is lobed, the two upper lobes joined

to form a lip with free tips.  It is tapered at the base and has hairs of uniform length and colour.

The petals are yellow with red-brown markings.  The standard petal is up to 9 mm long, the wing

petals are gently curved, to 8 mm long and the keel is acuminate, almost as long as the wings.

The style is gently incurved.

This species is similar to 

C. parviflorum which has narrow to linear leaves, and to C. racemosum

which has spinescent branchlets and linear leaves with revolute margins. 



C. genistoides differs its erect or spreading, spinescent branches, fewer leaves, minute stipules,

rounded calyx base, short keel and abruptly incurved style.



Flowering Period:  July-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species has been collected from three localities within the Moora District from east of

Dongara and in the Carnamah-Coorow area.  It is also recorded from Dowerin in the Merredin

District and from east of Geraldton in the Geraldton District.  No populations were found during

this survey.

It has been recorded as growing in red loam, sandy clay or clay soils.  Composites are the only

recorded associated species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* S of Carnamah

Ca

Road Verge



29.7.1961

-

-



2.* E of Coorow

Co

-



12.9.1966

-

-



3.* E of Dongara

I

-



12.7.1970

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999) 



22

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Taylor and Crisp (1992).



23

Conospermum densiflorum Lindl.

PROTEACEAE

subsp

. unicephalatum E.M.Benn.

Crown Smokebush



Conospermum densiflorum subsp. unicephalatum is an erect perennial shrub to 0.6 m, the stems

and foliage with long, spreading hairs.  The leaves are crowded, filiform, ca. 30-40 mm long, with

white, spreading hairs.  The peduncle is leafless, with a single head-like inflorescence which is

almost globular and ca. 1.5 cm in diameter.  The floral bracts are as long as the flowers, slender

and hairy.  The flowers are tubular and two-lipped, ca. 10 mm long, bluish-white in colour.

Differs from



 C. densiflorum in the single head of flowers on each scape, rather than several (up to

10) heads forming a compact corymb.



Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been recorded from near Gillingarra in the Moora District and also from near Gingin in the

Swan Region.

Grows in low lying clay soil.  No populations have been found during this survey as it is a recent

addition to the Priority Flora List.  Few details of habitat have been recorded.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* S of Gillingarra

VP

-

24.9.1975



Common-WH

"Regrowth

"

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



24

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Bennett (1995).



25

Conospermum scaposum Benth.

PROTEACEAE

Originally collected by Drummond, this species was described by Bentham in 1870.  It has been

collected a few times since then from the 1960s onwards from the Cataby to Mogumber area, and

also from east of Narrogin.

An erect, tufted perennial shrub to 90 cm in height, 



Conospermum scaposum has lanceolate

leaves to 4 cm long, arising from the base of the plant.  The flower heads are globular spikes,

borne at the ends of the long leafless flowering stems.  The flowers are pale blue in colour,

without stalks.  The fruit is a cone-shaped achene.



Flowering Period:  October-February

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The species has been recorded over a geographic range of ca. 70 km in the Moora District from

west of Mogumber to north of Cataby.  It is also known from east of Narrogin in the Narrogin

District.

It grows in yellow, grey or white sand over clay in tall shrubland, or in heath with 

Banksia

telmatiaea and Melaleuca bracteosa in seasonally wet areas or on gentle slopes above drainage

lines.


Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  Wolka Road

D

Shire Road Reserve 9.1.1992



100+

Growing on

graded road

edge


2.  Munbinea Road

D

Shire Road Reserve 5.8.1992



10+

Growing on

graded road

edge


3.  Munbinea Road

D

Shire Road Reserve 5.8.1992



20+

Growing on

graded road

edge


1.* SW of Badgingarra D

-

30.1.1969



-

-

2.* Wolka Road



D

-

6.11.1988



-

-

3.* W of Mogumber



D

-

27.1.1964



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Populations 1-3 were growing only on graded road edges with no plants seen in the undisturbed

bush behind the graded road shoulder.



26

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that markers are in position at populations 1, 2 and 3.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required particularly on disturbed areas of conservation reserves in the

known areas of occurrence.

References

Bennett (1995), Bentham (1870), Leigh 



et al. (1984).

27

Conostylis dielsii W.Fitzg. subsp. teres Hopper

HAEMODORACEAE

This subspecies is a tufted perennial herb to ca. 20 cm tall, with terete leaves, 13-33 cm long and

less than 1 mm wide.  The leaf bases are densely tomentose, the upper part of the leaf less hairy.

The flowering stem is 4-10 cm long with a dense many-flowered inflorescence.  The flower stalks

are short.  Each flower has the perianth joined for one third to half the length, the tube tapering

below the lobes, and divided above into six lobes.  It is cream in colour, 7.5-10 mm long, with a

short densely matted covering of hairs.  The persistent petal lobes on the fruit become claw-like,

touching at the apex with gaps at the bases.  The stamens are erect, in one row, shorter than the

filaments, the connective dorsally decurrent from the base upwards, without appendages.  The

placenta has several reflexed ovules.

Differs from 



Conostylis dielsii in the terete, not flat leaves, which are also slightly shorter.  Also

similar to 



C. teretiuscula, which has silvery, villous hairs on the leaves and numerous ovules on

the sides and lower part of the placenta.




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