Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



Yüklə 2,5 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə20/44
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü2,5 Mb.
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   44

Flowering Period:  July-August

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from a restricted area formerly in the Moora District north-east of Dongara, where only

one population has been recently found.  Also recorded ca. 30 km further north in the Geraldton

District.

Grows in white or grey sand with lateritic gravel, in heath, open scrub, low open heath and low

open woodland, in upland areas.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

 

Populations Known in the Moora District



Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.  N of Irwin

I

Shire Road Reserve 7.8.1992



1+

Some weed

invasion

Response to Disturbance

The population inspected in 1992 had been recently burnt in 1976 and was estimated then at



<10,000 plants.  There were few plants found in 1992.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999) 



28

Management Requirements

-  Monitor population 1.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, populations 2 and 3 have not been refound despite recent searches.



References

Hopper (1987).



29

Dampiera tephrea Rajput & Carolin

GOODENIACEAE

An ascending to erect perennial to 60 cm tall, with a whitish or yellowish covering of dense hairs

and terete stems.  The leaves are sessile and flat, elliptic to obovate in shape, often dentate,

hairless above, with a grey or yellowish tomentose lower surface, 15-47 mm long, 5-15 mm wide.

The flowers are borne in a leafy inflorescence with several flowers on each axillary branch.  The

axillary branches are 9-20 mm long, with two or three growing from the same point on the stem.

The corolla is 10-12 mm long, dark blue in colour, tomentose with long, grey, plumose hairs

mixed with shorter, stouter hairs.  The fruit is obovoid, to 4 mm long, slightly oblique.

This species is similar to



 Dampiera salahea which has white hairs on the lower surface of the

leaves and stout, shorter grey hairs on the corolla.  It is also similar to 



D.  altissima which has

greyish tomentose leaves becoming hairless above, and short, whitish corolla hairs.



Flowering Period:  July-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The species was described from collections made near Dongara and other populations have been

recorded from Eneabba southwards on the western side of the Moora District south to Regans

Ford.


Grows among heath or in open low woodland with scrub and low heath in sandy soil, sandy clay

or loam.


Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.  Cataby

D

MRWA Road Reserve 30.7.1991



1

Disturbed

2.  W of Dandaragan

D

Private



12.9.1988

-

-



3.  Capitella Road

D

Water Reserve



10.9.1988

-

-



1.* S of Badgingarra

D

-



1.11.1965

-

-



2.* Regans Ford

D

-



19.7.1978

-

-



3.* Greenhead

D

-



16.7.1986

-

-



4.* Dongara

I

-



12.8.1978

-

-



5.* N of Eneabba

?TS


-

12.8.1978

-

-

Response to Disturbance



Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


30

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Rajput and Carolin (1992).



31

Darwinia chapmaniana N.G.Marchant ms

MYRTACEAE

Eganu Bell

A low-domed multistemmed shrub to 0.6m tall and 3 m in diameter.  The leaves are grey green,

hairy, entire and linear, to ca. 7 mm long and ca. 0.5 mm wide.  They are crowded along the

upper stems, spreading at a wide angle.  The flower heads are erect to nodding, each surrounded

by long narrow bracts, reddish in colour but covered with stiff white hairs which give a hoary

appearance.  There are ca. 10 small tubular flowers with narrow petal lobes in each flower head.

They are reddish in colour, each with a long curved style slightly shorter than the inflorescence

bracts.


Flowering Period:  September-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from only one population south-east of Coorow where it occurs over ca. 400 m on both

sides of a track.

Occurs in woodland of 



Eucalyptus gracilis in red clayey loam or in shrubland and mallees with

Melaleuca species and Lachnostachys eriobotrya in red sand over broken rock.  Also occurs in

yellow soil in low flat areas of sandstone and limestone with 



Acacia  and mallee Eucalyptus.

Other associated species include



 Acacia uncinata and Melaleuca uncinata.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SW of Coorow

Co

Nature Reserve



24.9.1992

2000+


Undisturbed

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be high.



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



32

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in similar habitat in the nature reserve where it occurs.



References

N. Marchant (personal communication).



33

Darwinia sp. Carnamah (J.Coleby-Williams 148)

MYRTACEAE

Harlequin Bell

A dwarf shrub to 60 cm tall, with simple, keeled leaves, 3-4 mm long, ca. 1 mm wide, crowded

along the stems and appressed to them.  The inflorescence is somewhat pendulous, surrounded by

broad bracts, ca. 1-2 cm long, forming a "bell".  The bracts are green, red and yellow in colour.

There are several tubular flowers in each inflorescence, each ca. 5 mm long, with a long style.

Flowering Period:  October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known only from one population south of Carnamah.

Occurs in yellow clayey sand over laterite in open low scrub with 

Melaleuca sp., Acacia ligulata,

mallee 


Eucalyptus and Exocarpos sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

 

Populations Known in the Moora District



Population

Shire


Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.  S of Carnamah Ca

Rail Reserve, MRWA

Road Reserve

4.11.1992

26

Partly disturbed



and weed infested

Response to Disturbance

Unknown, possibly a disturbance opportunist (D. Papenfus, personal communication).



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be high.



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Ensure that markers are present at the known population.

-  Inform land managers of the presence of the population.

-  Control weeds at the known population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



34

References

N. Marchant (personal communication).



35

Daviesia pteroclada Crisp

FABACEAE


An erect shrub to 1.8 m tall and ca. 90 cm in diameter.  The branchlets are narrowly winged,

three-edged in cross-section, with the leaves reduced to scales.  The flower buds are enclosed in

prominent bracts at the base of the flower clusters which are closely spaced up the stems.  There

are 2-4 flowers in each cluster.  They have short stalks and are orange-red with purplish

markings.  The standard petal is much larger than the wings and keel, 7-8 mm long and wide.

The fruit is a thin, triangular pod 10-12 mm long.



Flowering Period:  July-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Endemic to the Moora District, occurring from the Lesueur area northwards to south-west of

Eneabba.

Grows on red clay loam and lateritic gravel or in gravelly red-grey soil over ferruginous

sandstone on slopes in low open heath, or sometimes in moist soils near creeks in open low

wandoo woodland.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.  Coorow-Greenhead

Road


Co

MRWA & Shire

Road Reserves

6.8.1992


1000+

Undisturbed

2.  N of Coorow-Greenhead

Road


Co

Shire Road

Reserve

6.8.1992


100+

Plants growing

in an area

disturbed some

years ago

1.* E of Mt. Peron

D

National Park



25.7.1980

-

-



2.* NNW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



6.11.1979

-

-



3.* ESE of Mt Peron

D

National Park



1.9.1989

-

-



4.* WSW of Eneabba

Ca

-



3.8.1976

-

-



5.* E of Mt Peron

Co

-



26.8.1949

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Population 2 grows in an area disturbed some years ago.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that markers are in place at both road verge populations.


36

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required particularly in the Lesueur National Park, to refind populations 3-7.



References

Crisp (1985, 1995).



37

Diuris tinkeri D.L.Jones ms

ORCHIDACEAE

[

Diuris sp. Three Springs (D.Jones s.n.)]

This species is related to 



Diuris picta.  It has pale, almost white flowers with darker, purplish

markings on the labellum.



Flowering Period:  October-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from two populations which occur ca. 1 km apart to the north-east of Eneabba.

It grows on a creek line in grey sand in open scrub of 

Allocasuarina campestris and Acacia sp.

with heath to 1 m tall.  Associated vegetation includes species of 



Verticordia, Eremaea,

Thryptomene and Jacksonia.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  NE of Eneabba TS

Shire Road Reserve

Private


30.10.1994

5+ (22.10.1992)

Heavy weed

infestation

2.  NE of Eneabba TS

Shire Road Reserve

3.10.1994

8

Undisturbed



but with

weed


infestation

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be low.



Management Requirements

-  Continue liaison with land managers and others interested in the conservation of the species.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

-  Conduct weed control where necessary.



Research Requirements

38

-  Further survey is required.



39

Drosera marchantii DeBuhr

DROSERACEAE

subsp

. prophylla N.G.Marchant & Lowrie 

An erect tuberous herb to 50 cm tall, but often supported by associated plants.  There is no basal

rosette of leaves and the lower part of the unbranched stem has numerous brown, narrow, pointed

bracts to 5 mm long, which have scattered stalkless glands.  The upper part of the stem has 10 to

12 scattered leaves.  Each leaf has a rounded, shallowly concave lamina to 4 mm in diameter, on

a stalk ca. 10 mm long which is attached to the leaf at the centre of the lower leaf surface.  The

leaf has fringing stalked glands and smaller glands on the lamina surface.  The inflorescence is a

panicle at the top of the plant, with 5-10 flowers.  The five, white petals are 15 mm long, 6 mm

wide.  There are three styles, branching twice into numerous terete segments, forming a tuft.

Distinguished from



 Drosera marchantii subsp. marchantii by the presence of numerous bracts on

the lower part of the stem rather than only on the upper part, and by the flower colour, which is

white, not pink.

Flowering Period:  June-July

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been collected only from the type locality north of Cataby but has been observed to occur

further northwards from this for ca. 50 km (A. Lowrie, personal communication).

Grows in laterite-silica sand soils, on hill tops on open ground in heathland.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  N of Cataby

D

Private


23.6.1983

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind and survey the known population and to

establish the range northwards from the type locality.


40

References

Lowrie (1987), Marchant and Lowrie (1993).

Illustrations by A. Lowrie.


41

Dryandra borealis A.S.George subsp. elatior A.S.George 

PROTEACEAE

[

Dryandra sp. 20 (A.S.George 16787) [aff. armata]]

This subspecies was first collected in 1983, and was referred to by Griffin (1985) as 



Dryandra sp.

H (Voucher A.S.George).

A bushy, erect shrub to 2.5 m in height, without a lignotuber.  The stems are closely pubescent.

The leaves are 4-9 cm long 12-30 mm wide, with deeply pinnatifid with 5-12 pungent pointed

lobes on each side.  The outer involucral bracts surrounding the inflorescences are mainly

glabrous, the inner ones are lime-green in colour when fresh and have black hairs fringing and as

central patches.  There are 30-50 flowers per head.  They are yellow in colour and the perianth

limb is 7-7.5 mm long.  The pistil is straight or somewhat bowed, 39-47 mm long.  The follicles

are hairy.

Differs from subsp. 



borealis in its larger, non-lignotuberous habit, with fewer leaf lobes, fewer

flowers in each head and less hairy pistil.



Flowering Period:  July-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from a few populations over a range of ca. 25 km and occurring to the west of Three

Springs. 

Occurs on laterite, lateritic gravel and loam, on slopes often high in the landscape, amongst open

low mallee woodland, scrub and low heath to 0.5 m, with 

Melaleuca cardiophylla, Allocasuarina

campestris and species of Hakea, Acacia, Astroloma, Dryandra and Eremaea.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey No. of Plants

Condition

1.  Nebru Road

TS

Private


2.10.1990

10 est.


Disturbed

2.  E of Arrino

TS

MRWA Gravel Reserve 24.9.1990



200 est.

Partly


disturbed

3.  Dookanooka

TS

Nature Reserve



22.10.1992

50+


Good

4.  SW of Three Springs TS

MRWA Road Reserve,

Private


10.7.1991

70+


Area grazed 

1.* N of Three Springs TS

-

14.10.1984



-

-

2.* SE of Arrino



TS

MRWA Road Reserve 19.9.1991

Occasional-WH -

1.  NW of Three Springs TS

MRWA Road Reserve 18.8.1993

10+


Undisturbed

2.  NW of Three Springs TS

Shire Road Reserve

18.8.1993

1

Undisturbed



3.  NE of Arrino

TS

Shire Road Reserve



18.8.1993

10+


Undisturbed

4.  Kadathinni

TS

Nature Reserve



26.7.1994

30+


Good

42

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that markers are in place at all road verge populations.

-  Maintain liaison with landowners and managers.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey, particularly to survey populations 5 and 6.



References

George (1996), Griffin (1985), M. Pieroni (personal communication).



43

Dryandra fraseri R.Br. var. oxycedra A.S.George

PROTEACEAE

[

Dryandra sp. 23 (A.S.George 16788) [aff. frazeri]]

An erect shrub to 6 m tall, without a lignotuber and with erect or spreading columnar branches.

The leaves are pinnately divided to the midrib, the segments fine and pungent.  The inflorescence

is terminal, with a convex receptacle and the involucral bracts shorter than the flowers.  The

flowers are yellow-brown in colour, the perianth claws are glabrous or sparsely hairy.  The pistil

is incurved and is longer than the perianth.

This variety differs from the other varieties of 

Dryandra fraseri in its size, being a much taller

plant, one of the tallest 



Dryandra species.  It also differs in its non-lignotuberous habit, and has

fewer, longer leaf-lobes and slightly larger flowers. 



Flowering Period:  August-early December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs over a range of ca. 20 km to the west of Three Springs.

Grows on lateritic hills in gravel, brown loam or lateritic sand and has been recorded from open

woodland of wandoo and jam, or powderbark wandoo 



Eucalyptus accedens, with low heath and

heath.  Associated species include other species of 



Dryandra, with Acacia, Allocasuarina and

Baeckea species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey No. of Plants Condition

1.  Kadathinni

TS

Nature Reserve



2.10.1990

700 est.


Partly disturbed

2.  SW of Three Springs TS

MRWA Road Reserve 24.9.1992

5+

Disturbed



3.  Thomas Road

TS

Shire Road Reserve



26.9.1990

1

Undisturbed



4.  Strutton Road

TS

Shire Road Reserve



26.9.1990

1

Disturbed and



weed infested

5.  Nebru Road

TS

Shire Road Reserve,



Private

2.10.1990

30 est. 

Some


disturbance

6.  SE of Arrino

TS

Rail Reserve, Shire



Road Reserve

18.8.1993

30+

Undisturbed



7.  SSE of Arrino

TS

MRWA Gravel



Reserve

26.7.1994

1000+.

Some


disturbance

1.* N of Arrino

-

-

9.1962



-

-

2.* 211.6 mile peg N of



Three Springs

TS

-



8.1972

Rare-WH


-


Yüklə 2,5 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   ...   44




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə