Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Flowering Period:  March

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known only from a few populations in the Lesueur area.

Occurs in gullies, slopes and below breakaways in low open heath with

 E. marginata,  E.

calophylla, E. haematoxylon, E. drummondii and E. lateritica in shallow sand over sandstone.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Mt. Peron

D

National Park



2.3.1983

-

-



2.* NW of Mt Michaud

D

National Park



3.3.1983

-

-



3.* ENE of Mt Peron

National Park

2.3.1983

-

-



4.* NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



24.5.1983

-

-



5.* E of Mt Michaud

D

National Park



21.9.1982

-

-



6. Cockleshell Gully

D

-



15.8.1991

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

61

-  Further survey.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required to refind populations 1-6.



References

D. Blaxell (personal communication), Brooker and Kleinig (1990).



62

Gastrolobium rotundifolium Meisn.

FABACEAE


Gilbernine Poison

A low, erect shrub to 0.6 m tall.  The leaves are opposite, with a pair of persistent stipules united

with the lower part of the leaf stalk.  The leaves are usually broad, with undulate margins, oblong

in shape, tapering to a pointed tip.  A form from between Miling and Walebing has narrow leaves

with the margins rolled under.  The branches and young leaves are hairy but the leaves become

hairless with age, dark green and hairless above and pale underneath.  The flowers are orange-

yellow with reddish-brown to purple markings.  They are borne in dense racemes at the ends of

the branches.  The flower bracts are broad, chestnut brown in colour and conceal the buds until

they open.  The fruit is a short, broad and hairy pod.

Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from several populations on private land and a road reserve near Watheroo but has been

collected in the past from a number of locations in the Moora District further to the south-east

between Miling and Calingiri.  It has also been recorded from north of the District at Mingenew

in the Geraldton District and from much further south in the wheatbelt near Wagin in the

Katanning District. 

Grows in white sandy clay soils or gravelly loam on quartzite ridges and granite, or on flat, sandy

clay soil in open low woodland of 



Eucalyptus wandoo and E. loxophleba with low, open scrub.

Associated species include 



Allocasuarina campestris and Melaleuca radula.  Prefers open areas

(Gardner and Bennetts 1956) but also grows in woodland.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status Last Survey No. of Plants

Condition

1. North-east of Watheroo Mo

Private


17.8.1993

5+

Healthy



2. North-east of Watheroo Mo

Private


17.8.1993

1

Healthy



3. East of Watheroo

Mo

Private



17.8.1993

2

Dense weed



infestation

4. East of Watheroo

Mo

Shire Road



Reserve

17.8.1993

15+ (54 + 45

recorded in

1989)

Healthy


5.*Bindi Bindi

Mo

-



9.1930

-

-



6.*Yerecoin

VP

-



13.8.1946

-

-



7.*Miling

Mo

-



7.9.1959

-

-



8.*Calingiri

VP

-



30.8.1948

-

-



9.*East of Carani

VP

-



16.9.1964

-

-



63

Response to Disturbance

The plant is known to sucker if cut off at ground level, so may resprout after fire.  It contains

monofluoro-acetate and is toxic to stock

.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Maintain liaison with land owners and managers.

-  Conduct weed control where necessary.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Aplin (1969, 1973), Bentham (1864), Everist (1981), Gardner and Bennetts (1956), Leigh 



et al.

(1984), Sampson and Hopper (1990).



64

Gompholobium sp. Gairdner Range (E.A.Griffin 2306)

FABACEAE


A low, erect shrub to 0.5 m tall with several erect stems arising from the base.  The leaves have

short stalks to 5 mm long.  They are divided into up to seven leaflets arising from the same point.

Each leaflet is folded and 10 to 20 mm long, ca. 3 mm wide with a pointed tip below which the

leaf is often shortly dilated to ca. 8 mm wide.  The flowers usually occur singly or with up to

three on each peduncle which is ca. 1 cm long, the pedicel is ca. 1.5 mm long.  Each flower has a

calyx divided into five oblong hairless lobes.  The corolla is yellow and ca. 1.5 mm in diameter.

The fruit is an ellipsoid pod ca. 10 mm long and 9 mm wide.  This taxon appears to be related to

Gompholobium polymorphum.

Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Endemic to the Moora District, occurring mainly in the Lesueur area but extending about 35 km

to west of Badgingarra.  It has been found in ca. 50 places in the Lesueur National Park with only

a few plants at each site (E. Griffin, personal communication)



.

Grows in white, grey or brown sandy or sandy clay soil with lateritic and sandstone gravel on the

slopes of hills or below breakaways.  Associated vegetation is of open low heath, associated

species including 



Allocasuarina humilis and Dryandra species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



6.10.1991

100+


Good

2. Badgingarra

D

National Park



20.10.1992

50+


Good

3.*ENE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



6.11.1979

-

-



4.*Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



22.9.1979

-

-



5.*N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



22.11.1979

-

-



Response to Disturbance

One population was growing both in undisturbed heath and on a firebreak, the other in an area of

regenerating heathland that had been burnt a few years previously.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



65

-  Ensure that population 2 is marked to prevent damage during firebreak maintenance.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in the Lesueur and Badgingarra National Parks.

-  Further taxonomic work is required.


66

Goodenia arthrotricha F.Muell. ex Benth.

GOODENIACEAE

This species was described as

 Goodenia bonneyana by Mueller shortly after Bentham’s

publication of 



G. arthrotricha in 1868.  The species is described from material collected by James

Drummond without location details.  It has been collected only five times since then.



G. arthrotricha is an erect perennial herb to 0.3 m with stems, leaves and calyx clothed in

glandular hairs which are brownish below the head.  The basal leaves are linear-oblanceolate, to 5

cm long, 3-5 mm wide, without stalks.  The stem leaves are smaller.  The flowers are grouped in

inflorescences to 20 cm long, each flower on a stalk 2.5-6 mm long with a linear bracteole at the

base.  The corolla is blue in colour with a white throat.  It is ca. 20 mm long, tubular and split

along one side with five unequal winged lobes.  There are no outgrowths inside the corolla.  The

fruit is ovoid to 5 mm long.

Flowering Period:  October-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species has been found recently at three localities, one on a nature reserve and two on private

land.  One of the latter populations is from south of the Moora District in the Wannamal to

Bindoon area in the Swan Region.

Grows in loamy gravel or brown loamy sand and granite on slopes, in low heath and in dwarf

scrub under low forest. 



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. S of Moora

VP

Nature Reserve 22.11.1990



Uncommon-WH -

2. N of Moora Mo

Private

15.10.1993



Common-WH

Regeneration in area of

rehabilitation after

mining


Response to Disturbance

Has been collected from one location which had been burnt the previous summer and in one

location was regenerating in area of rehabilitation after mining.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



67

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is necessary particularly on conservation reserves in the Bindoon to Wannamal

area and to refind and survey the known populations in the Moora District and Swan Region.

References

Bentham (1868), Carolin (1990a, 1992), Mueller (1868).



68

Goodenia xanthotricha de Vriese

GOODENIACEAE

Yellow-haired Goodenia

An erect, low shrub to 0.5 m tall without basal leaves.  The stems and leaves are viscid due to a

covering of glandular hairs which are yellowish and not brown below the heads.  The leaves are

almost sessile, linear or tapering to the base, with dentate margins, 15-35 mm long, 2-7 mm wide.

The flowers grow in racemes to 6 cm long with leaf-like bracts and narrow bracteoles.  The

corolla is ca. 14 mm long, an intense blue-violet in colour, with hairs and outgrowths inside the

tube which is split down one side and divided into five equal lobes.  The indusium is oblong and

the fruit is a cylindrical capsule to 6 mm long.



Flowering Period:  October, November, January-February

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Endemic to the Moora District where it occurs in the Lesueur area and has been recorded in the

past from ca. 25 km further to the south-east.  Grows on gravelly hills in shallow sandy soil in

low open heath.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.*N of Mt Michaud

D

National Park



12.10.1982

-

-



2.*Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



4.11.1962

-

-



3.*Hill River Spring

-

-



2.1940

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

69

-  Further survey is required to refind populations particularly in the Lesueur National Park and

in the vicinity of “Hill River Spring”, a locality in which it has not been refound.

References

Bentham (1869), Carolin (1992), Grieve and Blackall (1982).



70

Grevillea althoferorum P.Olde & N.Marriott

PROTEACEAE

[

Grevillea althoferi, Grevillea sp. Eneabba (E.A.Griffin 1448) [aff. rudis]]

A recently described species first collected in 1978 and known from few collections.



Grevillea althoferorum is a low, spreading, dense shrub to 0.5 m tall and 1 m wide with a

lignotuber.  The leaves are light blue-green in colour on both upper and lower surfaces.  They are

up to 7.5 cm long and to 5 cm wide, divided into 3-7 wedge-shaped lobes which have 3-4 apical

teeth.  The flowers are borne in erect racemes which are little longer than the foliage.  Each

flower is 5-6 mm long, dull reddish in colour, becoming dull yellow to cream.  The fruit are

unknown.


Closely related to

 G. rudis but differs in the leaves which are deeply divided into primary lobes

which are further divided, and the flower heads which are less compact and little longer than the

leaves.  The perianth of each flower is shorter and wider than that of 

G. rudis and is either

papillose or shortly bearded on the inner surface.



Flowering Period:  September-early November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from one population south-west of Eneabba but has been collected in the past from a site

now destroyed by mining ca. 5 km further east.  A new population has also been found recently in

the Perth District near Bullsbrook in an area which is affected by 



Phytophthora sp.

Grows in grey sand and pale brown gravelly loam sometimes on low rises, in low heath with 



G.

integrifolia, Lambertia multiflora and Banksia, Jacksonia, Hibbertia,  Eucalyptus  and

Actinostrobus species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

 

Populations Known in the Moora District



Population

Shire


Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1. SW of Eneabba

Ca

Road Reserve



30.5.1994

50+


Some weed

infestation

2.*S of Eneabba

Ca

VCL (Mining



Lease)

2.11.1978

-

Site now destroyed



by sand mining

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



71

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that the only known population is marked and maintain liaison with land managers.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly on conservation reserves.



References

Olde and Marriott (1993, 1995).



72

Grevillea curviloba McGill.

PROTEACEAE

A low shrub to 2.5 m tall sometimes with prostrate vegetative branches and upright flowering

growth and with sparsely hairy stems. The leaves are 1-4.5 cm long with up to 5 lobes, trifid or

simple, often curving upwards.  The leaf segments are linear to narrowly obovate, sometimes

slightly hairy.  The upper surface of the lobes has a channel along the midvein or is flat, with the

midvein never prominent.  The ultimate lobes are never more than 2 cm long.  The flowers are in

axillary or terminal inflorescences 1-3 cm long, with cream flowers ca. 3 mm long, on stalks 7-10

mm long.  The perianth is hairless on the outside with few or no hairs on the inner surface.  The

style has a conspicuous stylar swelling and the pollen presenter is obliquely conical to apiculate,

longer than broad.  The fruits are oblong to 1.3 cm long, with a rough surface.

This species has been separated into two subspecies which differ in the degree of division of the

leaves.  However, the specimen collected at Badgingarra in the Moora District has not been

sighted recently and its identification to subspecies is not known.

A prostrate form of this species is commonly cultivated as 

Grevillea biternata or G. tridentifera.

Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species occurs mainly in the Bullsbrook-Muchea area north of Perth in the Swan Region.

However a collection of the species was made in 1960 from Badgingarra in the Moora District.

This population was not refound during this survey.  It has also been collected from south of

Eneabba, although there is some doubt as to whether this is a natural occurrence.

There are no details of habitat available for the Badgingarra collection.  In the Swan Region this

species grows on sand or sandy loam in winter wet areas, in heath or open woodland.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

 

Populations Known in the Moora District



Population

Shire


Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.*S of Eneabba

Ca

-

9.1992



-

Possibly an escape

from garden

planting


2.*Badgingarra

D

-



9.1960

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



73

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required in suitable habitat in the Moora District.



References

Elliot and Jones (1980-1990), McGillivray (1993), Olde and Marriott (1995).



74

Grevillea delta (McGill.) P.Olde & N.Marriott

PROTEACEAE

[

G. thelemanniana Huegel ex Endl. subsp. delta McGill.]

A spreading shrub to 1.7 m tall, with long, spreading hairs more than 1 mm long on the

branchlets.  The leaves are 0.5 to 1.5 cm long, pinnately divided, with many linear lobes and

sometimes with the lower lobes divided but numbering less in total than 20 per leaf.  They are

grey-green in colour and glabrous, the upper surface with only the midvein apparent, the apex

acute to blunt, sometimes mucronate.  The flower heads are usually simple and axillary.  The

flowers are scarlet in colour, the perianth with few hairs outside, somewhat hairy on the inner

surface.  The pistil is 19.5-28 mm long and is glabrous, as is the ovary.  The pollen presenter is

oblique and convex.  The fruits are erect, oblong in shape, with the styles persistent.

Related to 



Grevillea thelemanniana and can also be confused with G. humifusa and G. preissii.

Distinguished by its height, by the spreading hairs which are more than 1 mm long on the

branchlets and by the pinnate leaves with the lower lobes sometimes divided, so that the ultimate

lobes are numerous, usually up to 10.  The leaves are 0.5-1.5 cm long.



Flowering Period:  July, September-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Endemic to the Moora District, occurring over a range of ca. 10 km in the Lesueur area.

Grows in brown loamy clay or grey gravelly soil over sedimentary rock along seasonal drainage

lines typically in wandoo woodland.  Also recorded from slopes of breakaways among sandstone

outcrops in brown sandy loam in low heath with mallees and open low woodland of 

Banksia

tricuspis.  It is reported to be common in places (E. Griffin, personal communication).

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



23.9.1992

15+


Partly disturbed

2.*E of Mt Peron

D

National Park



25.7.1980

-

-



3.*N of Mt Lesueur

Co

National Park



14.9.1979

-

-





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