Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to survey population 1 fully and to find further

populations on conservation areas.

References

Grieve and Blackall (1982), Morrison (1992).



106

Leucopogon plumuliflorus F.Muell.

EPACRIDACEAE

A weak upright shrub 30-60 cm tall, the stems and leaves with stiff, spreading hairs.  The leaves

are ovate-cordate, with a blunt point, convex with recurved margins, ca. 1 cm long.  The flowers

are in head-like terminal spikes which are white to pale pink in appearance.  The sepals have very

long plumose points and are ca. 5 mm long giving the inflorescence a feathery appearance.  The

corolla is ca. 3 mm long, the lobes shorter than the tube.  The ovary is 2-celled and the style is

very short.



Flowering Period:  August-October, February-April

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is restricted to the Lesueur area where it occurs over a narrow range of about 8 km,

but has been recorded from over 200 sites in that area (E. Griffin, personal communication).

Grows in shallow grey sand and lateritic gravel or in cream sandy clay in open low heath on

breakaway slopes.  Associated species include 

Hakea neurophylla, Xanthorrhoea drummondii

and 


Gompholobium sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



6.10.1991

100+


Undisturbe

d

2. NE of Mt Lesueur



D

National Park

17.4.1993

Frequent-WH

Undisturbe

d

3. NE of Mt Lesueur



D

National Park

21.9.1988

-

-



4.*NW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



27.8.1979

-

-



5.*Cockleshell Gully

D

National Park



10.11.1979

-

-



6.*Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



11.7.1982

Locally frequent-WH -



Response to Disturbance

Population 1 was growing in an area which had been burnt several years previously.  Sprouts

after fire (E. Griffin, personal communication).

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



107

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required to establish the full extent of populations in the area of occurrence

and to refind and survey populations 2-6.

References

Bentham (1869), Blackall and Grieve (1981), Mueller (1867).



108

Macarthuria sp. Mullering (B.J.Keighery 517)

MOLLUGINACEAE

An erect subshrub to 40 cm tall, with hairy, bright to yellowish-green stems.  The leaves are

present mainly at the base of the stems and on young growth.  They are narrowly obovate to

elliptic in shape, 2.7-11.5 mm long, 0.7-3.5 mm broad.  The flowers are in condensed cymes of

up to 25 flowers which are terminal or in the axils of the upper branches.  The flowers have five

sepals which are hairy on the outside.  The outer ones are green, the inner are partly white and

membranous.  The five petals are narrow, falling early.  There are 8 stamens joined at the base.

The style is small, divided into three.  There is one ovule per cell.  The seeds are round, black and

shiny.


This species is distinguished by the dense covering of golden hairs on the stems and leaves and

the large number of flowers in the inflorescence.



Flowering Period:  September-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known in the Moora District from one population north-west of Cataby where it occurs on white

sand in low woodland of 

Banksia menziesiiB. attenuata and Eucalyptus todtiana with low heath.

It appears to be a disturbance opportunist, being common in this area on the firebreak, but

uncommon in adjacent woodland.

The species has also been collected from Kewdale in the Perth area in 1981 and was rediscovered

in Forrestfield in the spring of 1995.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

 

Populations Known in the Moora District



Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.  Wolka Road

D

Shire Road Reserve 11.9.1991



1 in 1991,

common in

1990

Growing prolifically



on firebreak in 1990,

less common in

undisturbed

woodland


Response to Disturbance

Appears to be a disturbance opportunist, growing in large numbers in disturbed soils.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



109

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that the population is marked.

-  Discover status of land adjoining the population and inform landowner or manager.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

B. Keighery (personal communication), B. Lepschi (personal communication).



110

Malleostemon sp. Cooljarloo (B.Backhouse s.n. 16.11.88)

MYRTACEAE

A low, erect shrub to 40 cm tall and 40 cm wide, with spreading upper branches.  The leaves are

linear, 3-10 mm long, ca. 0.5 mm wide.  They are opposite on the main stems or crowded on short

leafy shoots.  The flowers occur singly in the axils of the upper leaves.  Each has five short, blunt

calyx lobes and five pink petals.



Flowering Period:  November-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Two populations have been found recently 19 km apart on the south-west side of the Moora

District.  It grows on pale grey sand over gravel and brown sandy clay in low, winter wet areas

with low scrub, low heath and dwarf scrub.  Associated species include 



Banksia telmatiaea,

Astartea fascicularis and Verticordia densiflora.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* NW of Cataby

D

?VCL


21.10.1990

-

-



2.* E. of Lake Guraga

D

Shire Road Reserve



1.12.1992

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required to refind both populations and conduct full surveys.

-  Further taxonomic work is required to clarify the taxonomic status of the taxon.


111

Myriocephalus suffruticosus Benth.

ASTERACEAE

Shrubby Myriocephalus

This species was first collected by James Drummond from between the Moore and Murchison

Rivers and was described by Bentham from these collections in 1866.

Myriocephalus suffruticosus is a subshrub to 80 cm tall, with a stout woody base and the branches

with a white, cottony tomentum.  The leaves are linear, to 2 cm long, half stem clasping, with

revolute margins.  The flower heads are hemispherical and up to 2 cm in diameter, with all the

florets tubular and bisexual and with an involucre of numerous petal-like bracts in several rows,

the bracts white, broad and conspicuous.  The achenes are glabrous and the pappus is made up of

several fine bristles with glandular heads.



Flowering Period:  November, December and April

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known from only six collections made between Badgingarra and Dandaragan.

Two populations which have been recorded recently are on adjacent private properties and at least

one population is fenced (E. Griffin, personal communication).

Has been recorded growing in wandoo woodland in gravelly loam and clay on upper slopes.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SE of Badgingarra

D

Private


7.11.1988

-

-



2.  SE of Badgingarra

D

Private



28.9.1988

Many


Excellent

1.* Badgingarra

D

-

26.11.1974



-

-

2.* Dandaragan



D

-

26.11.1974



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



112

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Bentham (1866), Grieve and Blackall (1982).



113

Phlebocarya pilosissima (F.Muell.) Benth.

HAEMODORACEAE

subsp

. teretifolia T.D.Macfarl.

A loosely tufted perennial herb with short rhizomes, to 25 cm tall and 50 cm diameter.  The stem

has long internodes, exposed between the partially overlapping bases of the old leaves.  The

leaves are terete and hairless or sometimes with fringing hairs in the upper 1-2 cm.  They are 0.6-

0.9 mm in diameter.  The sheaths are always hairy in the upper part, sometimes also to the base.

The flowers are in a cymosely branched panicle.  Each flower has 3 sepals and 3 petals of the

same size.  They are white, whitish-green to pale yellow in colour.  There are 6 stamens with

filaments inserted at the base of the perianth and the ovary is inferior. The style is divided into

three at the top, with three stigmas.  The fruit is one seeded.

Differs from 



Phlebocarya pilosissima subsp. pilosissima in the terete, not flattened leaves which

are mostly hairless.



Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs in the Lesueur area with one record from west of Badgingarra.

Grows in deep white sand, lateritic or grey sand in low shrubland or low mixed heath with

scattered 



Eucalyptus todtiana, Banksia menziesii and B. attenuata on slopes, below breakaways

and in shallow valleys.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* NW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



3.8.1979

-

-



2.* SSW of Mt Peron

D

National Park



17.10.1981

Common-WH

-

3.* Cadda Road



D

-

17.8.1975



-

-

4.* Cockleshell Gully Road D



-

21.9.1982

-

-

Response to Disturbance



Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



114

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  This taxon was not found during this survey and there are no herbarium records more recent

than 1982.  Most of the recorded populations are in the Lesueur National Park and therefore

are unlikely to have been destroyed but further survey is required to establish the status of the

species, particularly in the Lesueur and Badgingarra National Parks.

References

Macfarlane (1987).



115

Pityrodia viscida W.Fitzg.

CHLOANTHACEAE

This species was described by Fitzgerald from specimens which he collected in 1903 from the

Arrino sandplains.



Pityrodia viscida is an erect, branched shrub to 1 m tall.  The stems are almost hairless and viscid,

or with short, viscid hairs.  The leaves are sessile, opposite and oblong-obovate to narrow-elliptic,

with an obtuse tip, 7-13 mm long, 3-5 mm broad.  The upper leaf surface is hairless, viscid and

olive green, the lower surface is covered with yellowish-white hairs.  The flowers are solitary in

the upper leaf axils.  The pedicels, lower bract surfaces and calyx outer surface are all covered

with a viscid pubescence. The corolla is 9-12 mm long, with a tube which is gradually dilated and

4-5 mm long.  It is divided into a two-lipped upper lobe and three-lipped lower lobe and is white

in colour.  There are four stamens in two pairs, the lower pair longer than the upper, the anthers

with appendages on the lower end.  The ovary is covered with short hairs and the style is slender

and hairless, scarcely longer than the corolla tube.



P. viscida is closely related to P. glutinosa, which has hairless stems, leaves and outer calyx

surfaces.  It is also similar 



to P. hemigenioides, which has a cottony white tomentum on stems,

leaves and calyx and a corolla tube abruptly dilated from the calyx.



Flowering Period:  August-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Populations of this species are known from the northern boundary of the Moora District west of

Yandanooka, around Three Springs and south-west to south of Eneabba.  An early collection was

made by Diels in 1901 from Mingenew further north in the Geraldton District and has recently

been refound in that area.

Grows in grey or white sand, or yellow-brown sandy loam with laterite, in heath, low scrub and

open low woodland on slopes, hilltops and flat areas.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey No. of Plants Condition

1.  NW of Eneabba

TS

Shire Road Reserve



3.10.1991

700


Disturbed

2.  N of Tathra

TS

Shire Road Reserve



3.10.1991

206


Disturbed

3.  SW of Yandanooka

TS

Shire Road Reserve



25.9.1990

46

Disturbed



4.  NNW of Mt Muggawa Mi

Shire Road Reserve

25.9.1990

99

Disturbed



5.  E of Tathra

Ca

Shire Road Reserve



3.10.1990

58

Disturbed



6.  W of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Reserve



3.10.1990

680


Disturbed

7.  NW of Eneabba

TS

Shire Road Reserve



3.10.1990

18

Disturbed



8.  E of Tathra

Ca

Shire Road Reserve



4.10.1990

1000


Disturbed

9.  E of Tathra

Ca

Road Reserve



5.11.1992

10 est.


Disturbed

10. Yandanooka West Road ?M

Shire Road Reserve

18.8.1993

10+

Undisturbed



11. S of Eneabba

Co

MRWA Road Reserve6.11.1992



20+

Partly


disturbed

116

12. NW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Reserve



18.8.1993

10+


Undisturbed

13. Yandanooka West Road ?M

Shire Road Reserve

18.8.1993

1000+

Healthy


14. NW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Reserve,



Railway Reserve

18.8.1993

1000+

Undisturbed



1.* W of Yandanooka

Mi

-



31.10.1974

-

-



2.* Mingenew

Mi

-



12.9.1901

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Appears to favour disturbance, as all populations have been found on road verges and tracks in

soil disturbed by grading.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required on conservation reserves.



References

Fitzgerald (1904), Munir (1979).



117

Ptilotus caespitulosus F.Muell.

AMARANTHACEAE

Salt Lake Mulla-Mulla

This species was described by F. Mueller in 1868 from material collected by James Drummond.

Bentham included it as 

Trichinium caespitulosum in 1870.  The species was presumed extinct

until recollected in 1987 from private land near Coorow.



Ptilotus caespitulosus is a low, densely tufted perennial plant, with short crowded branches

covered with the overlapping persistent remains of the dead leaves.  The leaves are crowded on

the short non-flowering branches, linear-terete in shape, with a mucronate tip, to 6 mm long.  The

floral leaves are scattered on the flowering stems, which are up to about 14 cm tall.  The flower

spikes are hemispherical to conical in shape, 1-2 cm in diameter.  The bracts and bracteoles are

nearly glabrous, broad, with the midrib produced to a short point.  They are thin and shining, ca. 4

mm long, closely enveloping the perianth.  The perianth tube is short, slightly longer than the

bracts, densely hairy on the outside.  There are two perfect stamens with very short filaments and

a short style.

Flowering Period:  October-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The species is now known from two populations ca. 40 km apart on the north-east side of the

Moora District north-east of Carnamah and south-east of Coorow.

It grows on margins of salt lakes on grey to white clayey sand or white sand in low open scrub

with mat plants and herbs.  Associated species include 

Halosarcia, Atriplex, Rhagodia,

Frankenia, Melaleuca and Acacia species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey No. of PlantsCondition

1a. SE of Coorow

Co

Private



16.10.1991

70

Partly disturbed,



fenced

1b. SE of Coorow

Co

Private


16.10.1991

240


Partly disturbed,

fenced


2.

NE of Carnamah Ca

Shire Road Reserve,

Private


4.11.1992

8

Partly disturbed



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


118

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that roadside markers are in place at population 1.

-  Maintain liaison with landowners and Shire.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Benl (1972), Bentham (1870), Mueller (1868).



119

Restio stenandra L.A.S.Johnson & B.G.Briggs ms

RESTIONACEAE

[

Restio sp. (B.Briggs 7473)]

This is an undescribed species which has also been referred to as 



Restio sp. 2 (Briggs and Leigh

1988).  It was first collected in 1979 and is known from few collections.



R. stenandra ms is a low perennial herb with creeping rhizomes which forms large clumps.  It

grows to ca. 90 cm tall.



Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Appears to be restricted to the Lesueur area where it has been collected from a narrow range of

less than 10 km.

Grows in deep yellow sand of small watercourses, with lateritic gravel, adjacent to heath with

species of 

Hakea, Lambertia, Xanthorrhoea and Allocasuarina.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* SE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



29.9.1984

Locally abundant-WH -

2.* NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.11.1979 

-

-



3.* ENE of Mt Lesueur D

National Park

21.9.1979

-

-




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