Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire Land Status

Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1. W of Mogumber VP

Shire Road Verge  28.4.1992

50 est.


Population partly

disturbed and

infested with weeds

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


148

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Ensure that the population is marked.

-  Maintain liaison with the Shire.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, in the Moora District to find new populations, and in the Swan

Region and Narrogin District to refind and survey fully populations known from specimens at

the Western Australian Herbarium.



References

George (1991).



149

Verticordia comosa A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

An erect open shrub to 2 m, with rounded, entire leaves, 2-4. mm long.  The bracteoles are

persistent.  The flowers are pale yellow, the sepals are 4 mm long, with plumose lobes and peltate

basal auricles covering the hypanthium.  The petals are fringed, 4 mm long, with small basal

auricles.  The stamens have anthers attached basally with a swollen filament apex, the staminodes

are channelled and flared towards the apex.  The style is 4.5-5.5 mm long, with a one-sided and

tufted beard, the hairs to 0.8 mm long.

This species is related to

 Verticordia lepidophylla but differs in its larger leaves with spreading

tips, the larger sepals and larger fringed petals and shorter style with tufted beard.  The two

species occur in separate areas. 

Flowering Period:  August-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs over a range of ca. 25 km between Three Springs and Morawa on the north-eastern border

of the Moora District and extending north into the Geraldton District. 

Has been recorded growing in deep yellow sand, yellow clayey sand, loamy sand over gravel and

in greyish-yellow sand over gravel, in heath, open scrub and open woodland.  Associated species

include


 V. monadelpha, V. densiflora,  V. spicata subsp.  squamosa  and species of Eucalyptus,

Scholtzia, Acacia and Grevillea.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. E. of Arrino

TS

Shire Road Verge



18.8.1993

1

Narrow, weed



infested road verge

2. SW of Morowa TS

MRWA Road Verge 8.12.1992

45

Partly disturbed



3. E of Arrino

TS

Shire Road Verge



8.12.1992

10 est. + 1

Partly disturbed

4. SW of Morowa TS

?Private

19.9.1991

6 est.

Undisturbed



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



150

-  Ensure that all road verge populations are marked.

-  Clarify land status of population 4 and liaise with landowner or manager.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required on remnant vegetation in the Moora District and further north in the

Geraldton District.

References

George (1991).



151

Verticordia dasystylis A.S.George subsp. oestopoia A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

A dwarf, mounded, single-stemmed shrub to 30 cm high and 60 cm wide.  The leaves are oblong

to elliptic in shape, blunt at the apex, 1.5-4 mm long.  They have margins that are irregularly

toothed or are edged with fine bristles.  The flowers are on stalks 3-6 mm long and they are pale

creamish-lemon to bright yellow in colour.  The sepals are intricately divided into wide

spreading, fringed lobes and are 6-7 mm long.  Each petal is fringed and is 3 mm long.

This subspecies differs from the other subspecies in that the linear staminodes are shorter, only

0.7 mm long, whereas in the others they are 1.2 mm or longer.  The anthers are globular and the

style is 8 mm long with white hairs for up to three quarters of its length.

This species is related to 

Verticordia penicillaris from which it differs in its smaller size and more

hairy style.  The specific name means hairy or shaggy style.  This subspecies was known only

from the Arrowsmith area when it was named in 1991, the name “

oestopoia” is from the Greek

for arrow and to make or work, in reference to the name Arrowsmith.



Flowering Period:  October-early November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This taxon was originally collected from a few kilometres south of the Arrowsmith River north-

east of Eneabba within the Moora District.  It has not been refound at this location and is now

known from two small populations west of Bunjil, ca. 5 km east of the Moora District boundary

in the Geraldton District and ca. 60 km east of the original collection.

Grows in shallow soils of yellowish-grey clay loam or yellow-grey sand over granite in open

shrubland with associated species including

 Melaleuca radula,  Acacia uncinata,  Mirbelia

ramulosaV. monadelpha and Dodonaea sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* S of the Arrowsmith

River

TS

-



21.10.1982

-

Not refound at this



location

19.11.1991



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



152

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in suitable habitat south of the Arrowsmith River.



References

George (1991).



153

Verticordia fragrans A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

An erect shrub 1 to 3 m tall, with open branching.  The leaves are orbicular to elliptic and entire

in shape, 1.4-4 mm long, the bases partly stem clasping.  The flowers are borne on thick stalks in

dense spikes towards the ends of the branches.  They are pink and white in colour, both sepals

and petals being pink at the base and white above so that the flowers are dark pink at the centre.

They have a sweet honey scent.  The hypanthium is warty glandular and hairless with five green

broad, thick appendages from the apex.  The sepals are 3.5-4 mm long, with 6-9 broad, plumose

lobes and basal auricles covering the hypanthium.  The petals are 4-4.5 mm long with small basal

auricles.  They are 4-4.5 mm long, orbicular in shape, erect and entire with cilia towards the base.

The stamens are 3.5 mm long and the staminodes are oblong, acute and incurved, 3-3.5 mm long.

Verticordia fragrans differs from closely related species in its pink and white, fragrant flowers,

the broad sepal lobes, and entire upper margins of the prominent petals.



Flowering Period:  Late September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

In the Moora District this species is known from a few populations to the north and south of

Eneabba and one population further south in the Coomalloo area.  A collection made in 1959 of

uncertain location may be from Dinner Hill, which is ca. 25 km south-east of this, or from

Mullewa in the Geraldton District.  A recent report of the species has been made from just south

of Mullewa so it seems more likely to be the latter.

Grows in deep, white, grey to yellow sand with lateritic gravel beneath or in sandy clay loam in

tall shrubland, sometimes with open low woodland of



 Eucalyptus todtiana and Banksia attenuata

with open heath.  Associated species include



 V. aurea, V.  laciniata, V. grandis and V.

monadelpha.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1. S of Eneabba

Ca

Nature Reserve



6.11.1992

100+


Partly

disturbed

2. S of Eneabba

Ca

Nature Reserve



6.11.1992

50

Partly



disturbed

3. S of Eneabba

Ca

MRWA Road Verge 6.11.1992



50

Partly


disturbed

4. N of Eneabba

Ca

VCL


19.8.1993

50+


Healthy

5. NW of Eneabba

Ca 

?VCL


24.11.1993

50+


Healthy

6. NW of Eneabba

Ca

?VCL


24.11.1993

50+


Healthy

7. Coomalloo

D

Nature Reserve



5.11.1988

50+


Excellent

8.*Dinner Hill/Mullewa -

-

10.1959


-

-

9.*S of Eneabba



Ca

-

17.10.1984



-

-


154

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that markers are in place at population 3.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to complete full survey of population 7, and in the

Geraldton District to confirm the range extension over 100 km further north.

References

George (1991).



155

Verticordia luteola A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

var

. rosea E.A.George & A.S.George

This variety was described in 1994 after its discovery north of Eneabba by A. Tinker.

It is an upright, slender shrub to 1.5 m.  The leaves are obovate and erect, 3-4 mm long on the

main stems, and more crowded and spreading and 2-2.5 mm long on the side branches.  The

flowers are borne in racemes, on short stalks.  The hypanthium is deeply three-ribbed and has

reflexed green appendages.  The sepals are greenish-pink with a silver fringe, becoming lemon-

cream, 4.5-5.5 mm long, with 7-8 fringed lobes.  The petals are bright pink with a pale pink or

white fringe which is further fringed.  They are 6-6.5 mm long, the fringe is 3 mm long.  There

are acute, glandular staminodes, slightly shorter than the stamens.  The style is 5-6 mm long with

a dense beard for ca. 1 mm.



Verticordia luteola var. rosea differs from the typical variety in the flower colour, which is pink,

not yellow.  It flowers later, has slightly larger leaves, a longer petal fringe, and longer stamens

and staminodes.  It occurs further to the west and south-west of the distribution of 

V. luteola var.

luteola

Flowering Period:  December-January

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from an area north of Eneabba over a range of ca. 6 km.

It grows in deep white sand in low heath to 1 m with very open low woodland of 

Eucalyptus

todtianaBanksia attenuata and B. menziesii, associated species including Allocasuarina humilis,

Calothamnus sp. and Jacksonia sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. N of Eneabba

I

VCL


25.11.1993

100+


Healthy

2. N of Eneabba

I

VCL


25.11.1993

50+


Healthy

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

156

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

George (1991), George and George (1994).



157

Verticordia spicata F.Muell. subsp. squamosa A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

Spiked Featherflower

The subspecific name means scaly, referring to the small overlapping leaves.



Verticordia spicata subsp. squamosa is a shrub to 80 cm tall and 1 m wide with a compact, dense

habit.  The leaves are 1.5-2 mm long, rounded to elliptic, with prominent oil glands.  Their

margins are irregularly toothed or fringed with hairs less than 0.5 mm long.  They are pressed to

the stem and closely overlapping.  The flowers are closely packed, forming dense spikes on the

ends of the branches.  They are mauve pink in colour fading to white and are stalkless or with

short stalks.  The hypanthium is honeycombed with obscure ribs and has 5 green reflexed

appendages nearly as long as the tube.

The sepals are 3-4 mm long, fringed and with small basal auricles.  The petals are 3 mm long,

fringed with fine segments more than 1 mm long.  The stamens and staminodes are hairless and

the staminodes are linear. The style is 4 mm long, and bearded below the apex.

Differs from 

V. spicata subsp. spicata in the smaller leaves and flowers.  At the type locality V.

spicata subsp. squamosa grows with V. comosa and appears to hybridise with it.  The presumed

hybrid has spreading leaves 2-3 mm long, a hypanthium with shorter appendages, sepals with

prominent auricles and a style 5 mm long with a more dense beard than that of

 V. spicata subsp.

squamosa.  Another presumed hybrid has "offwhite" flowers, with larger sepal auricles and a

style beard with longer hairs. 



Flowering Period:  October-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs between Three Springs and Morawa where it is known in the Moora District from two

small populations and three other populations which occur just within the Geraldton District, all

within a range of 17 km.  Two of the latter populations have not been refound recently.

Grows in tall shrubland, in deep yellow sand.  Associated species include 

Eucalyptus jucunda,

Actinostrobus arenarius, Jacksonia sp., V. comosa, V. monadelpha, V. densiflora var.

stelluligera, V. eriocephala and Grevillea biformis.

The population on Simpson Road has declined over the last few years from 12 plants to two.

These are on a narrow, weedy road verge.  Two plants of the hybrid between this subspecies and

V. comosa are also present.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 1

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey No. of Plants

Condition

1. Simpson Road

TS

Shire Road



Verge

12.1993


2

On narrow, weed

infested road

verge


                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



158

2. Drew Road

TS

Shire Road



Verge

8.12.1992

3

Partly disturbed



3.*19 miles from Three

Springs towards Morawa

-

-

10.1951



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that road verge populations are marked.

-  Maintain liaison with the Shire.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the

Western Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required on remnant native vegetation in the area, and further north-east to

refind population 3.

References

Bentham (1866), George (1991), E. George (personal communication), Mueller (1859).



1

B.

Priority Two Taxa

Acacia anarthros Maslin

MIMOSACEAE

This species was originally described as 

Acacia drewiana W.V.Fitzg. subsp. pungens Maslin in 1975 but

collections of the fruits made in 1976 provided sufficient additional information to raise the taxon to

specific rank in 1979.

Aanarthros is a dwarf shrub up to 1 m tall.  The bipinnate leaves have decurrent leaf axes, each leaf has

one pair of pinnae, two to three pairs of pinnules and spiny stipules.  The flower heads are globular, about 0

5 cm in diameter with less than 20 flowers per head.  The pods are up to 6 cm long with seeds which are

dull, minutely roughened and mottled.

This species differs from 

A. drewiana in its single pair of pinnae, the pungent terminal seta and somewhat

pungent stipules and the number of flowers in the head. 



Flowering Period:  May-July and September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Aanarthros is distributed over a geographic range of 55 km from south of Bindi Bindi to near Bolgart in

the Moora District and westward into the Swan Region north of Bindoon.  It also occurs near Brookton in

the Narrogin District.  It is now known from thirteen populations with a total of more than 2000 plants. 

It grows beneath open woodland of 



Eucalyptus wandoo and E. calophylla in low heath or scrub with

Hakea, Dryandra and Grevillea species.  It occurs in sand, gravelly loam and gravel.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SE of Moora

Mo

Railway Reserve



3.7.1992

20

Some disturbance



2. Calingiri

VP

Townsite Reserve



13.5.1991

400 est.


Good

3. SW of Calingiri

VP

Shire Road Verge



9.3.1987

2

Healthy



4. N of Bolgart

VP

MRWA Road Verge 29.5.1988



10-20

-

5.* NW of Calingiri



VP

Shire Road Verge

20.9.1983

Occasional-WH

-

Response to Disturbance

Responds well to disturbance.  Several populations grow on graded road edges, one was noted to have most

plants along the edge of a firebreak.  Another in the Swan Region had good seedling regeneration after a

burn.


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

2

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that markers are in place at road verge populations.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in the Julimar area north-east of Bindoon, as few populations are

known from conservation areas.

References

Elliot and Jones (1982), Maslin (1975, 1979).



3

Acacia aristulata Maslin ms

MIMOSACEAE

An undescribed species, 

Acacia aristulata ms is a shrub to 1 m tall which may be erect, spreading or

decumbent.  The stems are slender and usually white.  The light to mid-green erect phyllodes have recurved

apices and are 7-10 mm long x 2-3.5 mm wide.  They may be glabrous or pubescent.  The stipules are

prominent, 2-3 mm long.  The flower heads are creamy-white, 5-6 mm in diameter on peduncles 10-20 mm

long.  The legumes are constricted between the seeds, loosely once-coiled or irregularly twisted, to 6 cm

long and containing elliptic, shiny, grey seeds with a dark nerve.

This species is similar to 

A. bidentata which has hairless phyllodes, smaller heads arranged in racemes and

smaller pods with uniformly coloured seeds.  It is also similar to



 A. rostellata which has somewhat pungent

branchlets, phyllodes with pungent tips, shorter peduncles, smaller heads and black seeds.




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