Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Flowering Period:  September-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Endemic to the Moora District where it occurs on low chert hills.  First collected in 1974, this species has

been recorded from four localities over a geographical range of ca. 35 km to the north of Moora.  It grows

on brown loamy sand or clay in rocky ground amongst low scrub.  Associated species include



Allocasuarina species and Dryandra sessilis.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Watheroo

Mo

National Park



12.9.1993

30 est.


Disturbed

2. N of Moora

Mo

Rail Reserve



16.10.1991

100 est.


Some weed infestation

3.* N of Moora

Mo

-

1.12.1986



-

-

4.* N of Moora



Mo

Road Verge

8.11.1990

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that population on rail reserve is marked.

-  Protect populations from fire until fire response is known.

-  Inform adjacent landowner of the presence of the population.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

                                                     

#

 now Declared Rare Flora (updated at December 1999)



4

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

B. Maslin (personal communication).



5

Acacia browniana H.L.Wendl. var. glaucescens Maslin

MIMOSACEAE

This variety of

 Acacia browniana was included as a form of variety endlicheri by Maslin in 1975 but was

raised to varietal rank by him in 1979.



A. browniana var. glaucescens is a dwarf, many-stemmed shrub to 30 cm tall, with hairy branches.  The

plant suckers from subterranean runners.  The leaves are bipinnate, with 1-3 pairs of pinnae.  The pinnules

are oblong, larger than those of var. 

endlicheri, being  6-10 mm long and 3-4 mm wide.  They also differ in

being flat rather than recurved, glaucous in colour, not green and usually without hairs.  The glands on the

rachis of the leaves are inconspicuous.  The flower heads are globular and yellow in colour.  The legumes

are larger than those of var. 



endlicheri being up to 45 mm long and 6-9 mm wide.  The seeds are dark

brown with a yellowish aril.

The glaucous foliage separates this variety from other varieties of 

Abrowniana.

Flowering Period:  August

Fruiting Period:  October-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs mainly in the Swan Region around Bindoon over a geographical range of ca. 35 km and has been

recorded once from the Moora District in 1929 from Mogumber, extending the known range further north

than the main area of distribution.  It was not refound in the Moora District during this survey.

Grows in lateritic gravel sometimes with brown loam, in wandoo or jarrah open forest.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Mogumber

VP

-

8.1929



-

-

Response to Disturbance

The plant suckers from subterranean runners.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.



Research Requirements

6

-  Further survey is required.



References

Elliot and Jones (1982), Maslin (1975, 1979).



7

Acacia chapmanii R.S.Cowan & Maslin subsp. chapmanii ms

MIMOSACEAE

An undescribed subspecies first collected in 1972 by H. Demarz from west of Three Springs.

Acacia chapmanii subsp.  chapmanii ms is a low dense shrub, divided at the base, 1-1.8 m tall.  The

phyllodes are spreading or reflexed, terete and pungent pointed, eight-nerved and 2-5 cm long, 0.7-1 mm in

diameter.  The stipules are persistent and usually spinose.  The globular flower heads are golden in colour,

4 mm in diameter and 14-19 flowered, on solitary peduncles 9-19 mm long.  The legumes are linear,

glabrous and coiled, to 4 cm long, 2.5-3 mm wide, containing longitudinal shiny mottled brown seeds. 

Related to 



A. acellerata which has 16-nerved phyllodes, paired peduncles and undulate legumes, and to

A. campylophylla which has shorter compressed phyllodes which are strongly recurved, and straight, broad,

papery legumes with transverse seeds.  It is also similar to 



A. subsessilis which has oblongoid flower heads

and shorter peduncles and to 



A. wilsonii in phyllode structure.  A. chapmanii subsp. australis, which occurs

near Bolgart, has ascending, recurved phyllodes, peduncles 12-19 mm long, non-spinose stipules and

flower heads 5 mm in diameter which are 24-27 flowered.

Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known only from near Three Springs and Marchagee over a geographical range of ca. 65

km. 

It grows in sand, laterite and clay loam, in scrub, heath or disturbed areas and sometimes on saline flats, in



heath with 

Grevillea  species, under open low woodland of Eucalyptus loxophleba and Actinostrobus

species.


Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SW of Marchagee

Co

Nature Reserve



25.9.1992

50+


Good, gravel

extraction nearby

2. SW of Three Springs

TS

MRWA Road Verge



18.8.1993

20+


Disturbed and

weed infested

3.* W of Three Springs

TS

-



27.8.1985

-

-



4.* SW of Marchagee

Co

-



29.8.1982

-

-



5.* SW of Marchagee

Co

-



29.11.1982

-

-



Response to Disturbance

The plants at population 2 are growing in an area which appears to have been extensively disturbed in the

past.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


8

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that population 1 is marked.

-  Inform Shire and adjacent landowner of population 2.

-  Ensure that nearby gravel extraction does not endanger population 1.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly on the national park and nature reserve around population 2.



References

B. Maslin (personal communication).



9

Acacia dura Benth.

MIMOSACEAE



Acacia dura was first described by Bentham in 1855 from a collection made by James Drummond.  It is a

shrub to 1.6 m tall, the young branches with ridges.  The erect linear phyllodes are thick and rigid, 2.5-4 cm

long and 2-4 mm wide.  The globular flower heads are borne on short stalks and are golden in colour.  The

pods are linear and somewhat constricted between the seeds, to 22 mm long, 3 mm wide containing shiny

tan-coloured seeds.

Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

A. dura has been collected from the Wongan Hills to Piawaning area over a geographical range of 30 km,

mainly within the Wheatbelt Region where it is known from two populations, of one plant on private land

and 33 plants on a shire road verge.  There has been one collection from within the Moora District, north of

Yerecoin.  The species was not refound in the Moora District during this survey.

It is recorded growing in sand in heath or clay and clay loam soils with 

Melaleuca uncinata, Calothamnus

aspera and Allocasuarina campestris.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.*N of Yerecoin

VP

-

21.8.1957



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is urgently required throughout the range of the species, particularly on nature reserves

and in the Wongan Hills to refind earlier recorded populations, most of which have not been seen for

more than ten years.



10

References

Bentham (1855, 1864), Blackall and Grieve (1974), B. Maslin (personal communication), Rye (1980).



11

Acacia lasiocarpa Benth. MIMOSACEAE

var. lasiocarpa Cockleshell Gully variant (E.A.Griffin 2309)

A compact, erect shrub to 50 cm tall.  Axillary spines are present at most nodes, one per node, and are 3-12

mm long.  The leaves are bipinnate with one pair of pinnae and 5-8 pairs of recurved pinnules, narrowly

oblong, 3-5 mm long.  The peduncles are 6-12 mm long and the bracteoles have long narrow points.  The

flower heads are globular, 5-7 mm in diameter and the flowers are yellow.  The pod is compressed,

narrowly oblong, little constricted between the seeds, 10-40 x 3-5 mm.

This variety has conspicuously hairy branchlets, 5-8 pairs of pinnules 3-5 mm long rather than 2-6 pairs 1-4

mm long and bracts which are long and narrow rather than short and pointed.

Currently recognised as an informal variant.

Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from only two collections made from the Lesueur area where it was recorded growing in grey-

yellow sand with lateritic gravel on the slope of a breakaway in low open heath.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.*Cockleshell Gully

D

National Park



29.8.1979

-

-



2.*Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



27.10.1973

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in the Lesueur National Park, to refind the original populations

and to establish the full extent of the populations in the area.


12

References

Marchant 



et al. (1987), B. Maslin (personal communication).

13

Acacia plicata Maslin

MIMOSACEAE

This species was described in 1975 by Maslin, from collections made in 1949 by Charles Gardner.  The

specific name refers to the pleated shape of the legumes.



Acacia plicata is an erect open shrub to 1.5 m tall, with densely hairy branches and leaves.  The leaves are

bipinnate and there are glands on the pinnae rachides.  The stalks of the flower heads are 1-3 cm long with

short hairs.  The flower heads are globular, yellow in colour, with long white spreading hairs on the

bracteoles and the calyx lobes of the individual flowers which are conspicuous on the buds.  The pods are

pleated, with up to 8 folds and are 1-2 cm long, 5 mm wide.  A variant in the Lesueur area has a low

straggling habit to 30 cm tall and glabrous flower head stalks.



Flowering Period: August-October, with young fruits occurring in October, maturing in mid-November,

but some may be retained undehisced on the plant until March.



Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

A species endemic to the Moora District, occurring in the Hill River and Cataby areas over a geographical

range of 75 km.

It grows in brown or grey-brown clayey loam, sometimes with lateritic gravel or over sandstone and

siltstone, in open heath beneath woodland of 

Eucalyptus wandoo, with E. calophylla and E. loxophleba.  It

is usually found along watercourses.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Lesueur

D

National Park



6.10.1991

30+


Partly disturbed

2. E of Jurien

D

Road Verge, Private



22.9.1992

200+


Disturbed

3. Lesueur

D

Private


8.3.1991

50 est.


Undisturbed

4. NE of Jurien

D

MRWA Road Verge,



Private & Education

Reserve


14.8.1991

30+


Partly disturbed

5. Cataby

D

MRWA Road Verge



15.8.1991

30

Partly disturbed



6.* E of Cataby

D

Private



15.9.1988

-

-



7.* E of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



5.9.1979

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Some populations occur in disturbed areas and may benefit from open conditions.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


14

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that all road verge populations are marked.

-  Maintain liaison with landowners and managers.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References 

Elliot and Jones (1982), Maslin (1975).



15

Acacia recurvata R.S.Cowan & Maslin ms

MIMOSACEAE

[

Acacia sp. Coorow (B.R.Maslin 6580)]

This undescribed species was first collected from east of Coorow in 1977 by Charles Chapman and was

only known from this population until another was discovered during this survey.

Acacia recurvata ms is a domed shrub to 2.5 m tall, with angular resinous branches which become terete

and minutely hairy with age.  The phyllodes are unequal, narrow elliptic in shape, with the upper margin

more curved.  They are held upright and are 3-4 cm long, 5-7.5 mm wide and leathery in texture, grey-

green in colour.  The flower heads are in pairs and are globular and golden in colour, to 5 mm in diameter.

The pods are linear, to 6 cm long, 4 mm wide.

Flowering Period:  June-July.  Young pods have been collected in September.

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from two populations over a geographic range of 45 km in the Three Springs-Coorow area.  Grows

in sandy clay and granitic clay-loam in 

Melaleuca uncinata shrubland on or near breakaways.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SW of Three Springs

TS

Nature Reserve



22.10.1992

70+


Good

2. N of Coorow

Ca

Shire Road Verge,



Private

19.9.1991

100 est.

Partly disturbed



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that road verge population is marked.

-  Maintain liaison with landowner and Shire.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



16

References

R. Cowan and B. Maslin (personal communication).



17

Acacia retrorsa Meisn.

MIMOSACEAE



Acacia retrorsa was first described in 1855 by Meisner from material collected by James Drummond from

between the Moore and Murchison Rivers.  In 1864 it was described by Bentham as 



A. sphacelata var.

retrorsa (Meisner) Benth.  The specific name refers to the phyllodes which point backwards on the stems.

A. retrorsa is a prostrate sprawling shrub to 1.5 m tall and 2 m in diameter.  The phyllodes are linear, terete

to flat, without stems, and with pungent points.  They are usually held reflexed on the stems.  The flower

heads are globular, light golden in colour, about 0.5 cm in diameter.  The pods are twisted, hairless and

dark brown in colour, to 6 cm long, 3.5 to 4.5 mm wide and restricted between the seeds.

This species is similar in appearance to 

A. sphacelata which has spreading or upright phyllodes and hairy

pods.


Flowering Period:  August-September.  Mature pods have been collected in November.

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Endemic to the Moora District and known from between Jurien and Eneabba over a geographic range of 35

km.

Grows in low open heath or low open woodland of 



Eucalyptus wandoo and E. loxophleba or E. calophylla

in sand or sandy loam, sometimes with lateritic gravel, usually low in the landscape.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SE of Mt Lesueur

D

Shire Road Verge



18.11.1992

2

Disturbed



2. E of  Jurien

D

Shire Road Verge



22.9.1992

20+


Disturbed and weed

infestation

3. N of Mt Benia

D

Shire Road Verge,



Education Reserve

14.8.1991

60+

Partly disturbed



4. SW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



1993

3

On track alignment



5.* NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



12.11.1979

-

-



6.* Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



21.8.1949

-

-



7.* N of Coorow-

Greenhead Road

Co

-

2.9.1979



-

-

8.* Cockleshell Gully



D

-

9.1938



-

-

Response to Disturbance

At population 1, the plants were growing on a scraped road verge, producing vigorous prostrate growth

with stems to 2 m in length, the plants reaching to 4 m in diameter.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

18

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that markers are in place at road verge populations.

-  Maintain liaison with Shire.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required to refind populations 5-8 and to survey fully and to determine the full extent

of the species in the area.

References

Bentham (1864), B. Maslin (personal communication), Meisner (1855).



19

Acacia telmica A.R.Chapman & Maslin

MIMOSACEAE

This species was described in 1992.  It was first collected in 1948 when it was identified as 

Acacia

perryana

A. telmica is a dense rounded shrub, to 1-3 m tall, and 1.5-5 m wide.  The young growth, branchlets and

raceme axes have spreading hairs.  The phyllodes are elliptic and obtuse, usually 2-nerved, 2-4 cm long, 8-

20 mm wide, dark green in colour.  The racemes are 15-25 mm long, with 3-5 flower heads which are

globular and golden, borne on peduncles 6-10 mm long which occur singly along the raceme axis.  The

legumes are ca. 5 cm long, 4-5 mm wide, containing grey-brown seeds with an orange or cream aril.

A. telmica is distinguished from A. rostellifera and A. xanthina by the dimensions of the phyllodes and by

the spreading hairs.  



A. startii, which occurs further north, has these characters but differs in its coiled,

more narrow legumes.




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