Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Flowering Period:  December-February

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from four populations north and west of Eneabba over a range of ca. 40 km, but herbarium records

indicate a larger range of ca. 70 km also to the south and east of Eneabba.

Grows in high open shrubland or open low woodland over heath, on coarse brown sand, white to yellow

clayey sand, white sand over gravel, and on grey or yellow sand, sometimes in seasonal swamps.

Associated species include



 Eucalyptus todtiana and Banksia attenuata. 

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. N of Eneabba

I

VCL


25.11.1993

1000+


Healthy

2. NE of Eneabba 

TS

Shire Road Verge,



Private

25.11.1993

200+

Healthy


3. E of Lake Indoon

Ca

Shire Road Verge



9.12.1992

20 est.


Recently burnt and

partly disturbed

4. NW of Eneabba

Ca

VCL



8.1.1992

5+

Undisturbed



5.* E of Jurien

-

-



12.1978

-

-



6.* 8 km S of Eneabba

-

-



5.2.1977

-

-



7.* E of Eneabba

-

-



1.1968

-

-



8.* 14 km S of Eneabba

-

-



16.12.1976

-

-



9. 25 km S of Eneabba

-

-



Undated

-

-



Response to Disturbance

35

At one population the plants were growing well on the disturbed soil of a firebreak.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that road verge populations have markers.

-  Liaise with Shire and landowner.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required to determine the present geographic range and conservation status of this

species.

References

Craven (1987b).



36

Calytrix drummondii Craven

MYRTACEAE

This species was first collected by James Drummond from an area in the north of the Moora District

between the Irwin and Arrowsmith Rivers.



Calytrix drummondii is a shrub to 1 m tall with closely spaced leaves, which are linear, 4-20 mm long, to 1

mm wide.  There are no stipules.  The flower heads are scattered, with bracteoles joined to form the

narrowly funnel-shaped cheiridium, which is 6-8 mm long, with a long spreading apex.  The hypanthium is

8-13 mm long, with 8 to 10 ribs, hairless and unequally triangular in cross-section, completely joined to the

style.  The calyx segments are joined at the base, produced into an awn to 15 mm long.  The petals are

yellow, 6-8 mm long.  There are 55-85 stamens, the filaments yellow, and the anther connective prominent,

often produced into a blunt horn. 

Flowering Period:  November-January

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from five populations in the Moora District over a range of 40 km but occurs north from the

District to the Kalbarri area with a total geographic range of over 300 km.

Recorded as growing on sand over gravel and white, yellow or grey sand, in low heath.  Associated with

species of 

Jacksonia, Melaleuca, Banksia and Hibbertia species

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Badgingarra

D

MRWA & Shire Road



Verges

8.1.1992


3

Undisturbed

2. Brand Highway, N of

Tootbardie Road

Co

MRWA Road Verge



8.1.1992

6+

Undisturbed



3. E of Warradarge Hill

Co

Shire Road Verge



8.1.1992

2

Undisturbed



4. Marchagee Track

Co

-



5.12.1992

-

-



5. Tathra

Ca

National Park



3.12.1992

-

-



6.* W of Winchester

Ca

-



6.12.1978

-

-



7.* Greenhead Road 

Co

-



14.1.1979

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



37

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that markers are in place at road verge populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey work is required for this species, particularly northwards from the Badgingarra area in

the Moora District towards Mingenew, where earlier collections have been made, and in the Kalbarri to

Northampton area of the Geraldton District.



References

Craven (1987b).



38

Calytrix eneabbensis Craven

MYRTACEAE

This species was described in 1987 and was first collected in 1966.

Calytrix eneabbensis is a shrub growing to 1 m or more in height, with alternate leaves which are

overlapping to widely spaced, the stipules absent.  The leaf blade is lanceolate, 3.5-10.5 mm long,

shallowly lunate to lunate in cross-section.  The cheiridium is funnel-shaped, 8-9 mm long, with a lateral,

scabrid keel.

The hypanthium is 10-13 mm long, 10-ribbed, hairless and partly free from style.  The free region tightly

surrounds the style.  The calyx segments are joined at the base and each has a scabrid awn to 10 mm long.

The petals are purple and yellowish-white at the base and there are 40-60 stamens in three or four rows.

This species is closely related to 



C. depressa, which has narrower leaves which are triangular in cross-

section and in which the hypanthium is free, not fused to the style. 



Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species has been recorded in the past over a range of ca. 36 km from the Eneabba area.  However,

known populations recently inspected are located to the north of Eneabba over a range of ca. 11 km. 

C. eneabensis is recorded growing in heath on sand, high shrubland on grey sand over laterite, and in open

low woodland on yellow sand.  Associated species include 



Eucalyptus todtiana, Nuytsia floribunda,

Banksia attenuata, B. menziesii, B. hookeriana, Adenanthos cygnorum, Xylomelum angustifolium and

Hakea obliqua.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. NW of Eneabba

Ca

Nature Reserve, VCL



& Shire Road Verge

24.9.1992

1000+

Undisturbed



2. NW of Eneabba

Ca

VCL



19.8.1993

100+


Undisturbed

3. N of Eneabba

I

VCL


25.11.1993

500+


Healthy

4.* SW of Eneabba

Ca

-

1.10.1981



-

-

5.* SE of Eneabba



Co

Nature Reserve

27.9.1979

-

-



6. NW of Eneabba

Ca

Nature Reserve



20.11.1992

-

-



7. Eneabba

Ca

Townsite Reserve



12.9.1990

Common-WH

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

39

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that road verge populations are marked.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind and fully survey populations 4-7.



References

Craven (1987b), Elliot and Jones (1990).



40

Calytrix platycheiridia Craven

MYRTACEAE

This species was described in 1987 and was first collected in 1971.

Calytrix platycheiridia is a glabrous shrub to 0.5 m tall.  The apices of the flowering stems continue the

growth, with the leaves overlapping or closely spaced.  They are hairless, with an ovate blade to 4.5 mm

long and to 2.5 mm wide.  There are no stipules.  The cheiridium is nearly flat, to 5 mm long.  The

hypanthium is up to 4 mm long, glabrous and 8-10 ribbed.  There are five calyx segments which are short,

to 0.5 mm long, ending in short projections.  The petals are cream in colour and yellow in the basal half.

The flowers are 1 cm in diameter.  The stamens are yellow, 35-50 in number.

This species is superficially similar to 

Calytrix ecalycata (formerly Calythropsis aurea) which has four

petals rather than five.



Flowering Period:  October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known from four populations over a range of 12 km to the north-west of Watheroo. 

It has been recorded growing in open low vegetation on pale yellowish-brown sand of a low sand ridge, and

on a flat site in tall open scrub and open 



Banksia attenuata woodland on white sand, and also in a slight

depression on pale yellow sand.  It also occurs in tall shrubland with 



Actinostrobus  sp. and species of

Baeckea, EremaeaLeptospermum and Verticordia on pale yellow-brown sand.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Pinjarrega

Co

Nature Reserve



9.10.1991

30+


Undisturbed

2. Pinjarrega

Co

Nature Reserve



23.10.1992

100+


Undisturbed

3. E of Lake Eganu

Co

Nature Reserve



23.10.1992

5+

Undisturbed



4. Marchagee Track

Co

Nature Reserve,



Shire Road Verge

& National Park

23.10.1992

200+


Good, but

firebreak running

through population

5.* Marchagee Track

Co

-

29.10.1981



-

-

6.* NW of Watheroo 



-

National Park

7.10.1971

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



41

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  The species may well be more common in the area where the known populations occur, which has a

series of large conservation reserves.  Further survey on foot is required north and south along the

drainage lines on which this species occurs as there are few tracks and more populations may exist

within the national park between the northern and southern known populations and also further south

(population 6). 



References

Craven (1987b), Elliot and Jones (1990).



42

Calytrix superba C.A.Gardner & A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

Superb Starflower

This species was described in 1963 from specimens collected by Charles Chapman in 1961. 



Calytrix superba is a hairless shrub sometimes growing to 1 m tall, but is usually shorter, 0.3-0.6 m in

height.  The leaves are scattered or overlapping, oblong-linear, 4-8 mm long with short stalks.  There are

small stipules present, to 0.3 mm long.

The flowers are in terminal clusters, with longer leaves below the clusters, to 11 mm long with white

membranous margins.  The bracteoles are 10-12 mm long, free almost to the base, with sharp recurved

apices.  The hypanthium is 10-15 mm long, hairless, 10-ribbed, completely joined to the style.  The

rounded calyx lobes are joined at the base and are produced into awns at the tip, which are 13 mm long.

The petals are large, bright pink in colour and yellow at the base.  The flowers are up to 3.5 cm in diameter.

There are about 25 stamens with pink filaments swollen at the middle.

The flowers of 



C. superba are much larger than those of any other species of Calytrix.  The swollen anther

filaments are also unique to this species.



Flowering Period:  November-February

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The species is at present known from populations over a range of 6 km to the north-west of Eneabba.

Herbarium records indicate that the range has extended in the past over 30 km to the north and south of

Eneabba.


C. superba has been recorded as occurring in low heath, on grey sand over clay, on lateritic sand and on

white sand, and in high shrubland with open shrub understorey on brown sand and lateritic gravel at the top

of a rise.  It has also been recorded in low heath with open low woodland of 

Eucalyptus todtiana on white

sand.  Species of



 Conospermum, Melaleuca, Calothamnus and Allocasuarina have been recorded as

growing in association with it. 



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

2. S of Beekeepers Road

Ca

Nature Reserve



30.4.1992

20+


Undisturbed

3. NW of Eneabba

Ca

VCL ?now Nature



Reserve

8.1.1992


1000+

Undisturbed

4.* S of Eneabba

Ca

Nature Reserve



5.2.1977

-

-



5.* N of Eneabba

-

-



6.12.1982

-

-



6.* Eneabba South Road

Co

-



24.1.1979

-

"common"



7.* S of Lake Indoon

-

-



16.12.1976

-

-



8.* Eneabba

Ca

-



10.2.1971

-

-



Response to Disturbance

43

Plants have been observed to be larger in open situations around a sand quarry than those in adjacent heath.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required throughout the range indicated by herbarium records to establish the present

range and conservation status of the species.  Full survey is required for population 1.

References

Craven (1987b), Dixon (1990), Elliot and Jones (1990) Gardner and George (1963).



44

Caustis gigas Meney & Dixon ms

CYPERACEAE



Caustis gigas ms is an undescribed species first collected in 1969.

It is a robust perennial herb to 2 m, with thick fibrous roots and straight green stems, arising from a

rhizome.  The leaves are reduced to dark brown bracts up to 4.5 cm long, which sheath the stem and are

produced into a pungent point on one side.  There are several branchlets arising from the axil of each bract.

The male and female spikelets are solitary and separate, 1 cm in length.  The spikelets have at least one or

more bisexual flowers with male flower below.  The glumes are spirally arranged, brown in colour with

pungent points.  The lower sterile glumes are shorter than the floral glumes.  There are no perianth

segments.  There are 3-6 stamens and three or more branches of the style.  The fruit is a nut, with no more

than one nut maturing in each spikelet.

Flowering Period:  May

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs over a limited range of 12 km in an area to the south-west of Coorow.

It has been recorded growing in sand heath, in white or grey sand, in open low woodland of 

Eucalyptus

todtiana over heath on pale brown sand on a flat low plain, and in open tree mallee over low scrub on white

sand and laterite on slopes.  Associated species include 



Adenanthos cygnorum, Lambertia  multiflora,

Actinostrobus acuminatus, Dryandra and Melaleuca species.

C. gigas ms has been recorded several times from the national park which is its only known area of

occurrence.  However, there is an extensive area of uncleared vacant crown land to the south of this which

has not been fully surveyed for this species. 

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SW of Coorow

Co

National Park



14.8.1991

100+


Undisturbed

2. SW of Coorow

Co

National Park



1.5.1991

59 est.


Partly disturbed by

firebreak

3. SW of Coorow

Co

National Park



1.5.1991

Approx. 50

Partly disturbed

4. SW of Coorow

Co

National Park



1.5.1991

Approx. 20

Partly disturbed

5. SW of Coorow

Co

MRWA Road Verge



1.5.1991

Approx. 20

Partly disturbed

6. SW of Coorow

Co

Shire Road Verge



1.5.1991

Approx. 10

Partly disturbed

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

45

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that road verge populations are marked.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey needs to be undertaken, particularly in uncleared areas adjacent to the location of the

known populations.

-  Further taxonomic study is required.



46

Comesperma rhadinocarpum F.Muell.

POLYGALACEAE

Slender-fruited Comesperma

Comesperma rhadinocarpum was first collected in November 1877 by Mueller "in thickets near the

Greenough, Arrowsmith and Irwin Rivers" and a description of the species was published in 1878.  The

species was presumed extinct until refound in 1977 south of Eneabba, although was not recognised until a

further population was found in 1988.

This species is a low perennial herb to 45 cm in height.  The leaves are linear lanceolate, 6-10 mm long,

with slightly roughened margins.  The pea-like flowers are blue and yellow, in long racemes at the end of

the stems.  The fruit capsules are long and narrow, to 9 mm long, 1.5 mm wide, containing brown seeds

each with a tuft of long hairs at the tip.  The specific name refers to these characteristic capsules, from the

Greek, 

rhadinos, slender, and karpos, fruit.

Flowering Period:  Late September-January

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The species has been recorded five times since Mueller's early collection.  Its distribution ranges from

south-west of Mullewa to the Perth Region, with two collections from the Moora District between

Badgingarra and Eneabba.

Grows in yellow or grey sandy clay or sandy soils, in open low scrub.  The species may be a disturbance

opportunist, having been found twice in disturbed areas and once on a graded road verge.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Badgingarra

D

Shire Road Verge



6.1.1992

5

On graded road edge



2.* S of Eneabba

Ca

-



30.9.1977

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Appears to be a disturbance opportunist.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that population 1 has markers in place on the correct road verge.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements


47

-  Further survey is required.



References

Leigh 


et al. (1984), Mueller (1878).

48

Crassula helmsii (Kirk) Cockayne

CRASSULACEAE

Swamp Stonecrop, Swamp Crassula

Crassula helmsii is an annual plant with branches up to 12 cm long which spread along the ground.  The

leaves are lanceolate to oblong elliptic, 3-8 mm long and 1.5-2.5 mm broad.  The flowers grow singly or up

to three from the axil of one leaf per node and have the parts in fours.  The calyx is shorter than the corolla,

the four lobes are triangular, to 0.8 mm long.  The corolla is cup-shaped, white in colour, with four

spreading lobes to 2 mm long. 

The style is about half as long as and tapering into the ovary, and the carpels each have 4-16 ovules.




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