Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SW of Three Springs

TS

MRWA Road



Verge, Private

10.7.1991

10

Area disturbed, at



gateway to recently

fenced block

2. W of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Verge



3.10.1990

3

Undisturbed



3. W of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Verge



3.10.1990

10

Undisturbed



4.* Yandanooka

TS

Nature Reserve



13.3.1986

Big population-

WH

-

5.* Yandanooka



TS

-

21.4.1988



-

-

6.* NNE of Eneabba



TS

-

28.5.1983



-

-

7.* E of Eneabba



Ca

-

25.7.1974



-

-

8.* Brand Highway



D

-

10.7.1973



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



63

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Brooker and Kleinig (1990), Napier



 et al. (1988a).

64

Gompholobium sp. Marchagee (B.R.Maslin 1427)

FABACEAE


This undescribed taxon is known from only six collections made between 1954 and 1971.

It is a straggling shrub to 60 cm tall, with branchlets covered with short, fine, erect hairs.  The leaves are

short, 3-7 mm long, divided into three or more narrow lobes with blunt ends and covered with short, stiff

hairs.  The flowers are borne at the ends of the branches, solitary or in clusters of two or three.  The flowers

have pedicels 1-2 cm long with linear, fine bracteoles.  The calyx is shortly hairy and the petals are pink in

colour, or very pale pink, cream and black or white with purple outside.  The keel and wings are about

equal in length.

This taxon has been confused with 



Gompholobium aristatum.  The latter differs in its short pedicels, stiff,

tapering bracteoles, yellow flowers with the keel longer than the wings, pointed, sparsely hairy leaves and

branchlets with long, soft hairs.

Another, more common taxon similar to 



G. sp. Marchagee has longer leaves and a more densely hairy

calyx with long, soft hairs.  See E.A.Griffin 5560. 



Flowering Period:  Late September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs between Moora and Coorow.

Has been recorded growing in yellow sand, and sandheath.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* W of Watheroo

-

National Park



6.10.1971

-

-



2.* W of Coorow

-

-



25.9.1962

-

-



3.* Watheroo

Mo

-



4.11.1954

-

-



4.* W of Coomberdale

-

-



2.11.1974

-

-



5.* S of Marchagee 

Co

-



20.10.1970

-

-



6.* W of Coorow

Co

-



30.9.1966

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

65

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required particularly in the area between Moora and Coorow on sand heaths, in order

to determine the conservation status of the taxon. 

-  Further taxonomic work is required in this group.



References

E. Griffin (personal communication), Marchant 



et al. (1987).

66

Goodenia trichophylla de Vriese ex Benth.

GOODENIACEAE



Goodenia trichophylla was described in 1868 by Bentham from specimens collected by James Drummond

in south-western Western Australia.



G. trichophylla is an erect herb, to 30 cm tall.  The basal leaves are tufted, linear, 2-4 cm long, ca. 2 mm

wide.  The flowering stems have leaf-like bracts, which are smaller than the leaves.  The flowering section

of stem is up to 20 cm long.  The flowers are in clusters of up to three on stalks to 9 mm long, each flower

stalk thread-like, to 5 mm long.  The sepals are narrow, to 1.5 mm long.  The flowers are blue, or pink with

a yellow throat or purplish-blue with a white throat, to 12 mm long, with five winged lobes.

The plant is covered with a viscid varnish when mature, with appressed peltate hairs.

This species is closely related to 

G. caerulea and G. glareicola but differs in its peltate hairs, which are

hidden by the secretion of viscid varnish.  These hairs cover the younger leaves and outside of the flowers.

There are also simple hairs on the calyx and corolla and the flower is smaller.

A specimen collected from north-east of Eneabba closely approaches this species but has little viscid

varnish.

Flowering Period:  November-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Two collections from the Moora District occur over a range of 30 km north and east of Eneabba.  Only one

population, occurring north-east of Eneabba has been seen recently.

This species is also known from two collections made 500 km to the south-east in the Lake King to

Ravensthorpe area in 1983 and 1986, growing in brown clayey sand with lateritic gravel in shrubland with

Malleostemon roseus and Callitris, Hakea and Verticordia species.

Has been recorded in the Moora District growing in grey sand and lateritic gravel in regenerating heath and

low heath with 

V. grandis, Hakea sp. and Xanthorrhoea sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. NE of Eneabba

TS

Shire Reserve



24.11.1993

1

Healthy



2.* E of Eneabba

Ca

National Park



11.11.1978

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Population 1 was growing in an area which had been burnt the previous summer.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


67

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.

-  Further taxonomic work is required to clarify the relationship of this species with closely related taxa.

References

Bentham (1868), Carolin (1990a, 1992).



68

Grevillea biformis Meisn. subsp. cymbiformis P.Olde & N.Marriott

PROTEACEAE

[

Grevillea integrifolia subsp. Eneabba (P.Olde 91/103)]

An upright shrub 1-1.7 m tall.  The leaves are boat-shaped and flattened, obovate in shape with the upper

surface hairless, the lower surface silky-hairy.  The inflorescence is a cluster of several racemes of flowers,

each raceme 8-13 cm long.  The flowers are creamy-white in colour, each ca. 5 mm long.  The fruits are 10-

12 mm long, 3-4 mm wide, obovate in shape, with a rough surface.

This subspecies differs from subsp. 



biformis in the obovate, not linear leaves, with one surface glabrous,

and in the wider fruit.  The leaves are similar to the juvenile leaves of 



Grevillea biformis, but at the type

location a number of plants have some leaves approaching those of 



G. biformis, which indicates that the

two taxa are conspecific (Olde and Marriott 1995).



Flowering Period:  Spring-summer

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This subspecies occurs in a small area to the south-south-west of Eneabba.  There are also two specimens in

the Western Australian Herbarium from the Wongan Hills area, one of which is recorded from a road

verge.


It grows in yellow-brown, grey or white sand, in low heath with 

Grevillea integrifolia, G. althoferorum,

Verticordia grandis, Hakea prostrata and Jacksonia sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SW of Eneabba

Ca

Shire Road Verge



30.5.1994

5+

Undisturbed



2.* W of Eneabba

Ca

-



27.2.1981

-

-



3.* S of Eneabba

Ca

-



28.9.1979

-

-



4.* S of Eneabba

Ca

?Nature Reserve



22.3.1981

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that road verge population has markers present.


69

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Olde and Marriott (1995).



70

Grevillea bracteosa Meisn.

PROTEACEAE

Bracted Grevillea

An erect loose shrub to 1-2 m tall, with narrow leaves which are usually simple but are rarely divided from

near the base into two or three linear segments.  They are 5-25 cm long, 1-3 mm wide, without hairs.  The

margins are rolled over and the midvein is only evident on the lower surface, with two lateral veins evident

on either side of the midvein on the upper surface.  The inflorescences are terminal, 3-9 cm long, globular

in shape.  The floral bracts are broad and conspicuous on the buds, 7-14 mm long, elliptic to obovate in

shape. The flowers are hairless on the outside, pink, purplish-pink or pale mauve in colour (a white-

flowered form occurs near Miling) and they are smaller from the southern part of the species range in the

Moora District than from those in populations further north.

The pistil including ovary is glabrous, 17-23 mm long, with a transverse torus.  The fruits are erect, to 15

mm long and 5 mm wide.

The collection from New Norcia has unusually short pistils, 11-12 mm, longer leaves and the perianth

appears pubescent, but Olde and Marriott (1995) state that the differences in the small conflorescence form

found in the south of the range are inconsistent and do not warrant formal infraspecific recognition.



Flowering Period:  September-December in the Moora District, August-October in the Geraldton District

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species was described from material collected by James Drummond.  It is known from the Geraldton

District, between the Moresby Range, north of Geraldton to Mullewa, and near Morawa, a geographic

range of ca. 140 km.  There are also records from a few localities further south in the Moora District, from

Mogumber and New Norcia and north-east of Moora.

Grevillea bracteosa is recorded growing in rugged, stony soil on hills and on granitic loam in heath or tall

shrubland, growing with 



G. petrophiloides in the Moora District.  In the Geraldton District it has been

recorded from grey sandy loam in closed scrub, gravelly clay, gravelly sand, sand and sand over gravel.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. N of Miling

Mo

Private


21.9.1991

500


Diseased

2.* Near Mogumber

VP

-

12.1962



-

-

3.* New Norcia



VP

-

11.1918



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback


71

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Population 1 requires monitoring.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is urgently required.



References

Bentham (1870), Lehmann (1848), McGillivray (1993), Olde and Marriott (1995).



72

Grevillea makinsonii McGill.

PROTEACEAE

The earliest collection of 

Grevillea makinsonii was made in 1903 by W.V. Fitzgerald from Arrino, but the

species was not described until 1986.



G. makinsonii is a shrub to 1.6 m, the leaves with a short petiole, obovate with flat margins and a blunt

apical point.  They are silky-hairy with a dense, appressed indumentum, and are 1-3 cm long and 3-8 mm

wide.  The flowers are in erect, usually terminal spikes, 3-7.5 cm long, the flowers with pedicels 2.7-4.3

mm long.  The perianth limb is nodding to declined in bud, 1.3-1.4 mm long, the outside of perianth

glabrous, pale yellow in colour.  The ovary is glabrous, the pollen presenter cone-shaped.  The fruits are 6

mm x 4.5 mm with a rough dark brown to black surface.

Most of the earlier collections were identified as 

G. integrifolia which has the perianth limb straight and

erect in bud.  It has also been confused with



 G. polybotrya which has glabrous or sparsely hairy leaves and

flowers which are sometimes hairy on the outside and which have pedicels less than 1 mm long.



Flowering Period:  July-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from Arrino westwards and south to east of Eneabba over a geographic range of ca. 45 km.  Most

known populations have been found recently.

Grows in clay, loam or sand over laterite, emergent in low heath on hill slopes, or in sandy loam and

laterite in low, open mallee woodland and scrub.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1.

SW of Arrino



TS

Nature Reserve,

Shire Road Verge

3.10.1990

500

Good


2.

SW of Arrino

TS

Shire Road Verge



3.10.1990

10

Disturbed



3.

SW of Three Springs

TS

Nature Reserve



22.10.1992

9+

Undisturbed



4.

SW of Three Springs

TS

Nature Reserve



22.10.1992

5+

Undisturbed



5.

SW of Three Springs

TS

Nature Reserve,



Shire Road Verge

22.10.1992

22+

Partly disturbed



6.

SW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Verge



22.10.1992

30+


Partly disturbed

7.

SW of Three Springs



TS

Shire Road Verge

22.10.1992

5+

Undisturbed



8.

SE of Arrino

TS

MRWA Road Verge 18.8.1993



1

Healthy, but on very

narrow road verge

9.

SW of Three Springs



TS

Shire Road Verge

18.8.1993

6

Undisturbed



10. SW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Verge



18.8.1993

50+


Undisturbed

11. SW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Verge



18.8.1993

5+

Undisturbed



12. E of Eneabba

Ca

Shire Road Verge



18.8.1993

20 est.


Healthy

13.* Arrino

TS

-

1969



-

-

14.* W of Watheroo



-

-

23.9.1926



-

-


73

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that markers are in place at all road verge populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required in the Watheroo and Arrino areas.



References

McGillivray (1986), Olde (1986), Olde and Marriott (1995).



74

Grevillea synapheae R.Br. subsp. pachyphylla Minyolo variant

PROTEACEAE



(S.Patrick & A.P.Brown SP 1139)

[

Grevillea pieronii Olde & Marriott ms]

A compact low shrub to 30-60 cm tall and 1-2 m wide with a lignotuberous habit and numerous branches

arising from the base.  The upper leaves below the flower heads are much smaller than lower leaves which

are deeply divided with seven or fewer narrow primary lobes, sometimes with secondary divisions.  They

are leathery with strongly recurved margins.  The floral bracts are not shed before the flowers open.  Each

flower head is dense and up to 6 cm long, borne conspicuously above the leaves.  The flowers are creamy-

yellow in colour.  The pollen presenter is short and has a slight basal collar.  The fruits are 8-13 mm long,

rounded with a blunt apex.

This taxon was included in the Declared Rare and Priority Flora List for 1992 as



 Grevillea pieronii ms.

Olde and Marriott (1993) stated that the differences between this form and 



G. synaphea subsp. pachyphylla

are not sufficiently clear to warrant separate ranking at this stage and in their publication it is treated

informally as the Minyolo form of subsp. 

pachyphylla.

It differs from 



G. synapheae subsp. pachyphylla in the lignotuberous habit, reduced upper leaves,

conspicuous inflorescences, deeply divided leaves and short pollen presenter.



Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been collected over a range of 25 km to the west of Dandaragan.  Occurs in low open heath and open

low woodland, on gravelly lateritic rises and grey sand above small creeks.  Associated species include

Eucalyptus todtianaAllocasuarina humilis and Gastrolobium spinosum.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Minyulo

D

Shire Road Verge



27.8.1992

5+

Undisturbed



2. Minyulo

D

Shire Road Reserve



5.8.1992

1

Undisturbed



3. Minyulo

D

Shire Road Verge



5.8.1992

4

Undisturbed



4.* Mullering Road

D

-



14.9.1991

-

-



5.* NW of Dandaragan

D

Private



11.8.1988

-

-



6.* S of Minyulo Brook

D

Shire Road Verge



20.9.1990

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

75

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Ensure that road verge populations are marked.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required to assess the conservation status of this form.



References

Olde and Marriott (1993, 1995).



76

Grevillea synapheae R.Br. subsp. synapheae Mt Misery variant

PROTEACEAE



(S.D.Hopper 6333)

This taxon was originally placed on the Priority Flora List as 



Grevillea sp. (Mt .Misery) S.D.Hopper 6333

aff. 


bipinnatifida.

It is a sprawling to prostrate shrub to 50 cm tall and 1 m across.  The leaves have a flexuose axis with

narrow almost pinnatisect primary lobes and pinnatifid secondary lobes.  The lobes are spreading or

directed backwards.  The flowers are in short, erect, pedunculate inflorescences and are cream in colour.

This taxon has been separated by Olde and Marriott as the Mt Misery form of 

G.  synapheae  subsp.

synapheae but some specimens closely approach the normal leaf type, so that no formal separation was

made until further sampling had been conducted.  They also noted an affinity to



 G. flexuosa in the flexuous

leaf rachis and spreading to backwardly directed leaf lobes, but the Mt Misery form differs in the fewer leaf

lobes and smaller fruits.



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