Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Flowering Period:  August-November, April

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from north of Eneabba east towards Winchester and south to the west of Watheroo National Park.

The earliest collection was made from Coorow in 1960 but no populations were found during this survey in

that area or so far east.

Grows in grey sandy clay or yellow or white sand in low heath under open low woodland of 

Eucalyptus

todtiana or mallees, low open banksia woodland or shrubland on flat plains or gentle slopes.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey No. of Plants

Condition

1.

Turkey Flat Road



Ca

Shire Road Verge

4.10.1990

30 est.


Partly disturbed

2a. Brand Mudge Road

Ca

Shire Road Verge



26.9.1990

20 est.


-

2b. Brand Mudge Road

Ca

Shire Road Verge



4.10.1990

40 est.


Undisturbed

3a. Carnamah-Eneabba

Road

Ca

MRWA Road Verge 15.11.1990



100+

Undisturbed

3b. Brand Mudge Road

Ca

Shire Road Verge



15.11.1990

50+


-

4.

Junction of Coalara



Road

D

Shire Road Verge



8.10.1991

5

Some regrowth of



plants damaged by

grading


5.

Big Soak Plain

Co

VCL


8.11.1991

30+


Disturbed by

Cannabis plantation

6.

S of Skipper Road



I

MRWA Road Verge 30.4.1992

2

Undisturbed



7.

Beekeepers Road

Ca

MRWA Road Verge 30.4.1992



2

Undisturbed

8.

S of Beekeepers Road Ca



Nature Reserve

30.4.1992

1

Undisturbed



9.

Marchagee Track

Co/D

Shire Road Verge



29.4.1992

50 est.


Undisturbed

10. Coalara Road

Co/D

National Park,



Shire Road Verge

20.11.1992

10+

Undisturbed



11. Coalara Road

Co

National Park



19.11.1992

10+


Undisturbed

93

12. Marchagee Track

Co/D

National Park



8.11.1991

10

Partly disturbed at



edge of graded road

13. N of Beekeepers Road Ca

VCL

1.9.1993


20+

Undisturbed

14. S of Yarra Yarra Lake Ca

Shire Road Verge

17.8.1993

4

Healthy



15. Beekeepers Road

Ca

VCL



19.8.1993

10+


Undisturbed

16. N of Beekeepers Road Ca

MRWA Road Verge 5.11.1992

3

Partly disturbed



Populations Known in the Moora District (Cont'd)

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey No. of Plants

Condition

17.* N of Eneabba

-

-



14.8.1976

-

-



18.* Coorow

-

-



1960

-

-



Response to Disturbance

The plants resprout from rootstock after mechanical damage.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be high.



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



References

Paust (ca. 1973).



94

Leucopogon glaucifolius W.Fitzg.

EPACRIDACEAE

An erect or spreading low shrub to 30 cm with finely-hairy branches and alternate, erect leaves to 13 mm

long and 2 mm wide.  They are glabrous, narrow-oblong in shape, with sharp pointed tips and rolled back

margins.  The flowers are distributed along the branches in 1-3 flowered spikes in the axils of the leaves

and are held erect.  The bracts and bracteoles are pale, with a prominent mucro.  The sepals are narrow,

pointed and glabrous, with shortly-hairy margins.  The calyx is longer than the corolla tube.  The corolla is

white, up to 5 mm long , the tube and lobes equal in length.  The lobes are revolute, bearded inside and

pointed.  The anthers are without sterile tips.  The fruit is globular, flat-topped with five ribs and is ca. 4

mm long.


This species is similar to

 Leucopogon brevicuspis and L. propinquus which are both larger shrubs with

longer, broader leaves.  The fruit of 



L. glaucifolius also differs in the flat-topped shape and the presence of

ribs.


Flowering Period:  November in the Moora District, also October and December further south.

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species was first collected in 1902 from Midland Junction and it is now presumed to be extinct in the

metropolitan area.

Since then several other collections of the species have been made.  Four are from locations to the west and

north-west of Dandaragan and one from south of Dongara in the Moora District.  There have been further

collections of the species from the Stirling Ranges and east of Geraldton.

In the Moora District, 

L. glaucifolius has been recorded occurring in white or grey sand in low woodland of

Banksia menziesii, B. attenuata and Eucalyptus todtiana in scrub.  The northern population was recorded

from low forest of 



E. erythrocorys and low scrub with Calothamnus quadrifidus, in brown-orange sand

over Tamala limestone.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Strathmore Road

D

Nature Reserve



5.11.1975

-

-



2.* Woolka Road

D

-



6.11.1988

-

-



3.* Mullering Road

D

Shire Reserve



1.12.1992

-

Long unburnt



4.* Bibby Road

D

National Park



7.12.1992

-

Long unburnt



5.* S of Dongara

I

Nature Reserve



20.11.1992

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Populations 3 and 4 and the population in the Geraldton District were recorded from areas that had been

long unburnt.


95

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Fitzgerald (1903), Kelly 



et al. (1993), Marchant et al. (1987).

96

Lysinema elegans Sond.

EPACRIDACEAE



Lysinema elegans is an erect shrub to 60 cm high with slender, shortly-hairy branches and small leaves.

These are oblong to ovate in shape, to 4 mm long, or shorter on side branches.  They are held erect and

appressed to the stem and are keeled.  The flowers form dense terminal heads, the bracts and sepals

forming a narrow cylindric involucre 10-15 mm x 1-2 mm and dark brown in colour around the base of

each individual flower.  The bracts have glabrous or nearly glabrous margins.  The corolla is creamy-white

in colour and has a narrow, cylindric tube up to 16 mm long, with spreading lobes to 6 mm long, which are

glabrous inside and out.  The anthers are long and  narrow, partly exserted from the corolla tube and

recurved.  The style is also exserted.



Flowering Period:  October-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

L. elegans has been recorded once in the Moora District when it was collected just north of Regans Ford in

1969.  It also occurs further south in the Swan Region where there is a large population in the Moore River

National Park and another west of Gingin, 40 km further south.  In the metropolitan area it occurs over a

range of less than 6 km in the Jandakot-Canning Vale District. 

The population at Regans Ford was recorded from a dry sandy depression.  No other details of habitat were

noted.  The populations in the Moore River National Park and at Gingin grow at the edge of damp

depressions on grey or white sand.  They occur in low woodland of

 Banksia attenuata and B. menziesii

over scrub.  Associated species in the Moore River National Park include 



Adenanthos cygnorum, B.

laricina, Verticordia nitens and Jacksonia eremodendron.

The location at Regans Ford has been searched but the population has not been refound.  The population in

the Moore River National Park is large (1000+ plants over a range of > 4 km).  There is also a population at

Gingin on private land of ca. 20 plants.  In the metropolitan area the species is known from a number of

populations with a total of several hundred plants, largely on private land. 

Areas of suitable habitat still exist to the north of Regans Ford and south of Gingin where the species may

still occur.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2 



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* N of Regans Ford

D

-

17.10.1969



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Favours open sites and is often found growing on firebreaks or cleared areas.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback


97

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required around its known occurrence in the north of the Swan District and south of

the Moora District.

References

Bentham (1869), Kelly



 et al. (1993), Leigh et al. (1984), Marchant et al. (1987).

98

Macarthuria apetala Harv.

MOLLUGINACEAE

A low perennial, herbaceous shrub to 30 cm tall, with erect slender stems forming a dense tuft.  The leaves

are linear, the lower ones 6-12 x 0.5-1 mm, or reduced to small scales.  The flowers are grouped in small

cymes of up to 20 in each, situated in the axils of the leaves or branches.  Each flower is very small, ca 2

mm long with a short stalk.  The calyx is divided to the base into five equal segments, oblong-elliptic in

shape, green and white in colour and 2 mm long.  The petals are absent.  There are eight stamens.  Each cell

of the three-celled ovary contains one ovule.  There are three styles, with small terminal stigmas.  The

persistent calyx encloses the capsule which splits by three valves to release the seeds.

Flowering Period:  September-November in the Moora District, February in the metropolitan area.

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Three populations of this species have been found recently over 50 km in the central part of the Moora

District between Badgingarra, Eneabba and Watheroo.  There are also earlier records from near Jurien Bay

and just south of Regans Ford.  It also occurs at two locations in the metropolitan area.  There is a

collection from Dryandra State Forest further south which has an affinity to this species.

Macarthuria apetala grows in grey sand, in open low banksia woodland and heath, sometimes in areas of

disturbance.  Associated species include species of 



DryandraHypocalymma, Hakea and Conospermum. 

Two populations in the Moora District occur on national parks, and a third, which is known only from a

recent anonymous collection, may be from within a nature reserve.  The populations in the metropolitan

area are on a local government reserve and a nature reserve.  The species has been found on a recently

burnt area and on a firebreak, indicating that it may be a disturbance opportunist.

Further survey is required within the known range in the Moora District and further south to the

metropolitan area.  As the species is small and relatively inconspicuous, possibly evident only after

disturbance, it may be under recorded. 



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. W of Badgingarra

D

National Park



8.10.1991

50+


Healthy, plants

mainly on firebreak

2.* Cervantes

D

-



11.9.1978

-

-



3.* NW of Watheroo

D

National Park



17.11.1988

-

Occurred after fire



4.* S of Eneabba

Ca

-



11.1991

-

-



5.* S of Jurien Bay

D

-



12.9.1973

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Some populations have been found on recently burnt or disturbed soil.



99

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind populations 2-5.



References

Bentham (1878), G. Keighery (personal communication), Marchant 



et al. (1987).

100

Mesomelaena stygia (R.Br.) Nees

CYPERACEAE

subsp

. deflexa (Kuek.) K.L.Wilson

An erect perennial herb to 30 cm tall, forming loose tussocks.  The stems are without nodes, pale green in

colour, 0.5-0.7 mm in diameter.  The leaves have dull sheaths, yellow-brown in colour and the leaf blade is

rigid, channelled and pungent, with a membranous ligule.  There are two, unequal involucral bracts, the

lower much longer than inflorescence, deflexed at ca. 90 degrees to the stem, ca. 40-60 mm long.  The

inflorescence is subglobular, the glumes arranged in two opposite rows.  There are three perianth segments,

with broad bases enclosing the nut, and in the upper part abruptly narrowing to long, twisting points.  The

fruit is a nut, ca. 2.5 mm long .

This taxon differs from 

Mesomelaena stygia subsp. stygia in the deflexed involucral bract, more slender

stems, shorter nuts and less shiny leaf sheaths.



Flowering Period:  July-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

No populations were found during this survey in the District.  It has been recorded from south of Eneabba

and 60 km further to the north-east in an area west of Arrino where it was recorded in 1980.  There is an

unconfirmed report that this taxon also occurs north-west of this, in the Mt Adams area. 

Grows in clay and gravel, grey or white sand over clay or laterite, on breakaways or slopes, in low open

heath. 


Conservation Status

Current: Priority  2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* SSE of Eneabba

Co

-

16.10.1981



Common-WH

-

2.* WNW of Arrino



TS

-

22.7.1980



-

-

3.* S of Eneabba



Ca

VCL (Mining Lease)

25.10.1978

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

101

-  Further survey is required.



References

D. Corbyn (personal communication), Marchant



 et al. (1987), Wilson (1981).

102

Monotoca leucantha E.Pritz.

EPACRIDACEAE

A slender, upright shrub to 40 cm tall, the leaves overlapping and appressed to the stem, broad at the base,

1-2 mm long, with 6-9 ribs, terminating in an incurved, pungent point.  The flowers are white, with 3-5

flowers on each peduncle, in dense spikes at the ends of the branches.  Each flower is small, bell-shaped,

with five glabrous petals 1 mm long, above the tube, and five stamens with filaments inserted at the top of

the tube.  There is a two-lobed stigma and the ovary is two-celled.

Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from one population near the southern boundary of the Moora District and from another population

in the Swan Region 12 km to the south-west.  Earlier records indicate that it also occurred to the north of

Mogumber, ca. 14 km to the west.

The species has also been collected recently from west of Bruce Rock and near Hyden, in the Narrogin

District of the Wheatbelt Region, giving a total geographic range for the species of over 300 km and a total

of 1700+ plants.

Occurs in the Moora District on low rises or near the crest of ridges, on cream loam with quartzite gravel,

in open shrub mallee over dense heath, with associated species including

 Eucalyptus accedens, Dryandra

armata and Melaleuca uncinata.  Elsewhere it is recorded on white clay quartz sand below breakaways.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. S of New Norcia

VP

Nature Reserve



10.9.1991

100+


Undisturbed

2.* Babilion Hills

VP

-

25.9.1934



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



103

References

Blackall and Grieve (1981), Diels and Pritzel (1905).



104

Nemcia axillaris (Meisn.) Crisp

FABACEAE


A diffuse, sprawling shrub to 40 cm tall, with terete branchlets, and stipules present at the base of the

leaves.  The leaves are opposite, elliptic, broadly ovate or broadly obovate, the upper surface glabrous and

faintly reticulate, the lower surface covered with short silky hairs and with an open reticulation.  There are

6-8 flowers in each axillary cluster.  The calyx is covered with long, soft hairs and has five lobes, the lower

three are acute, the upper two blunt.  The flowers are pea-shaped, the petals yellow and dark red in colour.

The standard petal is 10-11 mm broad.  There are four ovules in the ovary and the fruit is a pod. 

This species can be distinguished from 

Nemcia reticulata by its smaller flowers, obtuse upper calyx lobes

and elliptic leaves.  The standard petal in 



N. reticulata is 14-15 mm broad, the upper calyx lobes are blunt

and the leaves are obovate to linear in shape.

Originally described as 

Gastrolobium axillare by Meisner in 1855, but since 1864 has been treated as

Oxylobium reticulatum var. gracile (Bentham 1864), until 1923 when it was included in Nemcia by Domin.

In 1987 the classification of 



Gastrolobium was revised by Crisp and Weston, who resurrected the genus

Nemcia  from synonymy and expanded it to include species of Gastrolobium with trifid bracts and

condensed inflorescences.



Flowering Period:  August-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

The species is known over a range of 100 km from Regans Ford to the Lesueur area, and extending south of

the Moora District to Bindoon.

It occurs on grey or white sand, loamy sand or brown loam and laterite, or lateritic gravel over clay, in low

heath usually on slopes below breakaways.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.

SE of Cataby



D

MRWA Road Verge 30.7.1991

10+

Disturbed



2.

SE of Cataby

D

Nature Reserve 



30.7.1991

Undisturbed



3.

Coomallo


D

Nature Reserve

11.9.1993

10+


Healthy

4.* NW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



27.8.1979

-

-



5.* Wolba Road

D

-



11.8.1988

-

Disturbed



6.

N of Dandaragan

D

Shire Road Verge



13.8.1991

1

Undisturbed



7.

Mimegarra Road

D

Shire Road Verge



11.9.1991

1

Undisturbed



8.

W of Dandaragan

D

Private


25.9.1991

5+

Undisturbed



9.

Minyulo


D

Nature Reserve

26.9.1991

5+

Undisturbed



10. Minyulo

D

Nature Reserve



26.9.1991

1

Undisturbed



11. Waddi Road

D

Shire Road Verge



26.9.1991

5+

Undisturbed



12. Badgingarra

D

National Park



20.10.1992

10+


Plants on edges

of firebreak

13. Banovich Road

D

Shire Road Verge



18.11.1992

10+


Undisturbed

14. Coomallo 

D

Nature Reserve



18.11.1992

30+


Undisturbed
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   44




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