Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



Yüklə 2,5 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə37/44
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü2,5 Mb.
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   44

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



120

References

Rye (1995).



121

Stylidium aeonioides Carlquist

STYLIDIACEAE

A tufted perennial with flowering stems to 18 cm high, one to several arising from each rosette.  The basal

rosette of elliptic spathulate leaves is flattened to the soil.  The leaves are 3-6 mm broad, about 10 mm long,

glabrous, with a transparent fringe along the margins.  There are scattered, narrow leaves on the stems

alternating annually with zones of small scale leaves which cover the older stems. 

The inflorescence is a panicle.  The calyx is top-shaped with obtuse lobes.  The flowers have four ovate-

elliptic lobes, yellow in colour, slightly unequal, the larger ca. 3 mm long. and with six minute throat

appendages, two of which may be bifid, so that there appear to be eight.  The labellum is minute, triangular

in shape.  The fruit is a capsule ca. 2 mm long.



Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Endemic to the Moora District where it occurs from the Lesueur area south to Cataby, a geographic range

of ca. 75 km. 

Occurs among low heath in sandy pockets or gravelly loam on lateritic slopes of mesas or breakaways, or

in shallow white sand over sandstone. 

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Coomallo

D

Nature Reserve



18.11.1992

5+

Undisturbed



2. SE of Cataby

D

Nature Reserve



25.9.1991

10+


Population partly

on firebreak

3. W of Dandaragan

D

Private



25.9.1991

1+

Undisturbed



4.* NW of Dandaragan

D

Shire Road Verge



23.9.1988

-

-



5.* NNW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



4.9.1979

-

-



6.* NW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



4.9.1979

-

-



7.* W of Badgingarra

D

-



26.10.1967

-

-



8.* Mt Peron

D

National Park



1.10.1957

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Population 2 occurred partly on a firebreak.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

122

-  Maintain liaison with landowner.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Carlquist (1969), Grieve and Blackall (1982).



123

Stylidium diuroides Lindl. subsp. paucifoliatum

STYLIDIACEAE

A.Lowrie & Carlquist

Northern Donkey Triggerplant

An erect stilted herb with flowering stems to 30 cm tall.  The lower leaves are grass-like, to 4 cm long,

forming a basal tuft.  There are two whorls of linear, leaf-like bracts on the flowering stem, and a few

bracts above them.

The flowers are in a loose raceme.  The calyx is shorter than the flower stalk, with five narrow lobes, longer

than the tube, hairless except for glandular hairs on the margins.  The petals are yellow in colour, each petal

rounded-oblong in shape and with a red nerve on the back.  They are paired, the lower pair slightly smaller.

There are six yellow, linear throat appendages and an oval labellum with a long narrow point.  The column

is longer than the petals and the anthers are dark.  The ovary is densely glandular hairy.  The fruit is an

ovoid capsule. 

Differs from 



Stylidium diuroides subsp. diuroides in the sparsely leaved rosette, with smooth leaf surfaces,

not minutely papillate, a 2-whorled flower stem, rather than 1-whorled, a terete axis to the flower spike, not

angular, glandular margins of the calyx lobes and densely glandular ovaries, not sparsely glandular.

Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs in the Moora District over a 100 km range from east of Dongara south to the Lesueur area and

eastward for ca. 60 km.  There is another early record made in 1905 from further east at Jibberding in the

Merredin District.  It has also been collected recently from further north of the Moora District and in 1931

from the Mullewa area ca. 70 km further north, in the Geraldton District .

Grows in white or grey sand over laterite, or in sandy loam over sandstone, sometimes at the top of

breakaways, in low open heath to 1 m.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. W of Mingenew

I

Rail Reserve



23.9.1990

1000 est. 

Good

2. N of Badgingarra



Co

National Park

12.1.1993

Frequent


-

3. N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



6.10.1991

10+


Good

4.* S of Eneabba

Ca

?VCL


7.11.1978  

-

-



5.* NW of Eneabba

 I

?VCL



17.10.1975

-

-



6.* W of Arrino

TS

-



3.10.1973

-

-



7.* Watheroo

Mo

-



4.11.1954

-

-



8.* Cockleshell Gully

D

?National Park



15.10.1946

-

-



Response to Disturbance

124

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Erickson (1981), Lowrie and Carlquist (1991).

Illustration by A. Lowrie.


125

Stylidium nonscandens Carlquist

STYLIDIACEAE

A glabrous perennial with a shrub-like habit to 45 cm tall, branching from near the base with quadrangular,

reddish-brown stems.  The leaves are linear, to 40 mm long, arranged in dense whorls along the stems,

spaced ca. 6 cm apart.  The flowers are in terminal solitary racemes up to 9 cm long.  The flowers are borne

on stalks to 1.5 cm long with a pair of bracts at the base of each.  The calyx lobes are acute, ca. 3 mm long

about the same length as the tube.  The corolla is pale pink, with a short tube and obovate lobes 7 mm long

by 5 mm wide.  There are six throat appendages, four are minute and united into pairs, the anterior two are

larger.  The labellum is ca. 2 mm long, with glandular hairs, and with a pair of filiform basal appendages as

long as the labellum.  The fruit a capsule ca. 6 mm in diameter.

This species is related to

 Stylidium scandens, which has a more southerly distribution.  S. nonscandens

differs in its quadrangular stems, lack of tendril tips to the leaves and thus a non-climbing habit, narrow

acute calyx lobes, pale not deep pink corolla colour, with corolla lobes united for half their length.  The

throat appendages are much smaller and the labellum has short basal appendages.  The vesiculate hairs

among the anthers are more conspicuous.  The capsules have a crescent-shaped septum, not a globose

placenta.  It is therefore regarded as a northern variant of 



S. scandens.

Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is endemic to the Moora District.  The main area of occurrence is between Tathra and

Alexander Morrison National Parks, extending west to the Lesueur and Coomalloo areas.  There is also an

earlier record made in 1974 from the south of the District west of Mogumber.  This population was not

refound during the survey.

Occurs on white sand over laterite, greyish white clayey sand or sandy clay with gravel, sometimes on

slopes, in low open heath and open mallee scrub.  Associated species include 

Eucalyptus drummondii,

Dryandra and Conospermum species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Garibaldi-Willis Road Co

Shire Road Verge,

?Gravel Reserve

5.11.1992

60+


Undisturbed

2. Garibaldi-Willis Road Co

Shire Road Verge,

Shire Gravel Reserve

5.11.1992

6

Undisturbed



3.* Alexander Morrison

Co

National Park



8.1988

Occasional-WH

 -

4.* Alexander Morrison



Co

-

12.9.1985



Occasional-WH

-

5.* N of Mt Michaud



D

National Park

12.10.1982

-

-



6.* Alexander Morrison

Co

-



29.9.1979

Common-WH

-

7.* N of Alexander



Morrison

TS

Reserve for use and



benefit of Aboriginals

22.11.1978

-

-

8.* Coomallo



D

-

9.8.1977



-

-


126

9.* Red Gully Road

VP/G

-

6.10.1974



-

-

Response to Disturbance

May be favoured by disturbance.  It was noted at a population west of Coorow that the plants were

especially abundant on road margins.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that road verge populations are marked.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Carlquist (1976).



127

Thysanotus spBadgingarra (E.A.Griffin 2511)

ANTHERICACEAE

An erect perennial to ca. 35 cm tall, with a rhizome and fibrous roots.  The leaves are absent and the stems

are terete and striate, branching acutely in the upper part.  The flowers have six fringed purple tepals.

There are six stamens, the three inner anthers are 7 mm long, the three outer anthers are 2.5 mm long. 

This species appears to be closely related to



 Thysanotus sparteus but plants in the field were noted to have

distinct characters differing from those of that species, including stem width, striations and branching, and

there were also differences in the stamens and sheathing bracts.

However, recent taxonomic studies in the genus



 Thysanotus have concluded that T. sparteus is an

extremely variable species and requires further study before division into subgroups can be made.  The

characters noted in 

T. sp. Badgingarra (E.A.Griffin 2511) are considered to fall within the variation in T.

sparteus and it is considered that the taxon does not warrant separation from T. sparteus at this stage.

Flowering Period:  November-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from two collections in the Lesueur and Badgingarra areas.

Recorded as growing on grey sand in high shrubland and on dark grey to orange sandy loam with lateritic

gravel in low open heath.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.*S of Cockleshell Gully

D

-

10.11.1979



-

-

2.*Badgingarra



D

-

15.12.1976



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further taxonomic research is required.



128

References

E. Griffin (personal communication), H. White (personal communication).



129

Tricoryne robusta Keighery ms

ANTHERICACEAE

A semi-prostrate, rhizomatous herb to 85 cm tall.  The stems are robust and the lower part of the stem is

densely hairy.  The leaves are basal and linear, the lower part densely hairy.  The flowering stems are terete

and branched, with linear bracts.  Each branch has a terminal umbel of flowers.  These are large, with a

yellow perianth, of six free, narrow segments ca. 8 mm long, which become spirally twisted when the

flower withers.  There are six upright stamens, the filaments ca. 2.5 mm long, attached at the base of the

perianth.  Each has a tuft of hairs below the anther, which is ca. 1 mm long.  The superior ovary is deeply

three-lobed with three locules, breaking into three mericarps.  The style is filiform, with a simple stigma.

This species differs from others in the genus in its robust habit, large flowers and woolly basal part of the

stem.

Flowering Period:  September-January

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been recorded from near Cataby north to the Arrowsmith area and also further north in the Geraldton

District to the north of Northampton.

Occurs on flat land, growing in white sand or sandy clay over clay, grey-yellow sandy gravel on flats or

gentle slopes, sometimes on lateritic uplands or on coastal limestone, in low open heath, shrubland, or

banksia scrub.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Twyata

D

MRWA Road Verge 6.11.1992



2+

Undisturbed

2. S of Cockleshell Gully

D

National Park



10.12.1992

15

Partly disturbed



3. N of Eneabba

I

-



14.1.1989

Common-WH Regrowth after fire

4.* NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



3.11.1979

-

-



5.* S of Eneabba

Ca

VCL (Mining Lease) 25.10.1978



-

-

6.* Mimegarra Road



D

-

28.10.1973



Common-WH -

7.* W of Watheroo

-

-

30.11.1961



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Regenerates from rootstock after fire.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

130

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

G. Keighery (personal communication), Thongpukdee (1987).



131

Triglochin stowardii N.E.Br.

JUNCAGINACEAE

Stoward's Arrowgrass

An erect hairless, annual herb, 10-17 cm tall.  The leaves are terete-filiform, 3-5 cm long and 0.5 mm wide.

The flowering stalks are 4-12 cm long, with the flowers in a simple raceme.  There are six perianth

segments, in two whorls of three, concave and ovate lanceolate in shape, with acute tips.  The outer three

are 1.5-2 mm long.  There are six anthers and the ovary is made up of three carpels.  The flowers are green

or greenish-yellow in colour.

This species has affinities with 

Triglochin calcitrapa but differs in the stalked fruits which are smaller and

narrower.



Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been recorded from north-east of Watheroo and north of Moora in the Moora District.  Also occurs

eastwards in the Merredin District and further south in the Narrogin District. 

Grows in sand, or loamy sand on winter-wet flats, amongst other herbs. 



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* N of Moora

Mo

-

29.9.1966



-

-

2.* NE of Watheroo



Co

Road Verge

29.9.1966

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



132

References

Blackall and Grieve (1974), Brown (1914), Grieve and Blackall (1982).



133

Trymalium urceolare (F.Muell.) Diels

RHAMNACEAE

This species was described in 1904 from a Drummond collection made last century and was also known

from specimens collected by Diels from near Toodyay at the turn of the century.  It was presumed extinct

until refound north of Bindoon in 1986.

Trymalium urceolare is an erect shrub to 80 cm tall with ovate leaves to 1.5 cm long, ca. 7 mm wide.  They

are glabrous above, white woolly beneath.  The flowers are cream in colour, in short panicles with a zigzag

axis.  The panicles are not much longer than the leaves.  The calyx is hairless and the five petals are hooded

but the small stamens are released as the petals open.  The fruit is an urn-shaped capsule ca. 3 mm long

with a persistent disc. 

Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs on the southern boundary of the Moora District south of Calingiri.  The species also occurs further

west in the Swan District to the north and north-east of Bindoon.

Grows in brown gravelly loam or in red-brown clay loam in woodland of wandoo and York gum, jarrah or

marri over low heath or open low scrub. 

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SW of Calingiri

VP

Shire Road Verge,



Public Utility Reserve

9.9.1991


100+

Undisturbed



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in conservation reserves.



134

References

Blackall and Grieve (1981), Diels and Pritzel (1904), Leigh 



et al. (1984), Rye (1995).

135

Verticordia blepharophylla A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

An erect open shrub to 1 m tall, with one basal stem and no lignotuber.  The leaves are broad elliptic, 2-5

mm long, edged with prominent cilia which are up to 1 mm long.  The flowers are in spike-like groups at

the ends of the branches.  There are five green reflexed appendages, each ca. 1 mm long on the ribbed

hypanthium.  The sepals are five to seven-lobed, and fringed, 4-4.6 mm long.  The petals are 4-4.5 mm long

with a fringe to 1.5 mm long.  The flowers are usually pinkish-mauve in colour, sometimes bright pink.

The stamens and staminodes are glabrous, the stamens 1 mm long.  The style is up to 5 mm long and

bearded below the apex.

This species is closely related to 



Verticordia pennigera but differs in its non-lignotuberous habit, the larger

hypanthium appendages, the sepals lacking auricles, and ovate petals with slender fringe segments and the

shorter stamens. 

Flowering Period:  November-February

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from the Mt Adams area south to the Badgingarra area.  A collection made in 1991 from Mimegarra

Road south of Badgingarra is a hybrid with 

V. lindleyi.

Grows in white to yellow brown sand or clayey sand and gravel in swampy areas and near drainage lines.

Populations are found in open scrub and open shrub mallee with species of 

Eucalyptus, Banksia,

Melaleuca, Acacia, Calothamnus, Conospermum and Anigozanthos.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 2



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1. N of Badgingarra

Co

Shire Road Verge



4.1.1995

100+


Numerous seedlings

on road shoulder

2. S of Cockleshell Gully D

National Park

10.12.1992

100 est.


Partly disturbed

3. Lake Indoon

Ca

MRWA Road Verge 9.12.1992



200 est.

Recently burnt and

disturbed

4. E of Warradarge Hill

C

MRWA Road Verge 10.12.1992



5

Partly disturbed

5. SW of Mt Adams

-

-



30.11.1988

-

-



6. S of Mt Adams

-

-



30.11.1988

-

-




Yüklə 2,5 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   ...   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   ...   44




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə