Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Response to Disturbance

Population 2 was recorded in an area burnt two years previously.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



474

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in the Lesueur National Park where it has been reported from many

populations.

References

Bentham (1863), Blackall and Grieve (1985).



475

Conospermum eatoniae E.Pritz.

PROTEACEAE

A small shrub to ca. 75 cm tall and about 1 m wide, intricately branched with many stems, forming a dense

rounded shape.  The stems are glabrous and leafless and the leaves arise from the base of the plant, disappearing

with age.  They are obovate to oblong in shape.  The flowers are arranged in short, terminal panicles which are

dichotomously branched.  They are bright blue in colour and hairless.  The perianth is two-lipped, the upper lip

with an acute, recurved apex, and the lower lip three-lobed.  The nut has orange hairs and is ca. 2 mm long.

The degree of branching in the panicle is less in younger plants and is also less in plants at the north of the range.



Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species has been recorded over a wide range, from north of Badgingarra and Watheroo to Gillingarra in the

Moora District and through the central wheatbelt from Dowerin, Kellerberrin, Tammin and Quairading, and

further south.  There is also a report of the species from west of Coorow.

It grows in grey or yellow sand on low areas sometimes near lakes, in scrub heath, or open low banksia

woodland.  One population was recorded from sandy clay loam over granite.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* NW of Watheroo

Mo

National Park



7.10.1971

-

-



2.* N of Badgingarra

Co

-



29.9.1979

Occasional-WH

-

3. N of Gillingarra



VP

-

25.7.1985



-

-

Response to Disturbance

One population had regenerated in a paddock cleared and sown with tagasaste.

Two healthy populations are on areas which are grazed at times.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind populations previously recorded in the District.



References

Bennett (1995), Diels and Pritzel (1904-5), Sainsbury (1991).



476

Conostephium minus Lindl. 

EPACRIDACEAE

Pink-tipped Pearl Flower

An erect shrub up to 60 cm tall.  The leaves are linear, to 2 cm long, with revolute margins, clustered towards the

ends of the branches.  The flowers are solitary, in the axils of the upper leaves.  They have pedicels less than 2

mm long, which become recurved so that the flowers are held horizontally or nodding.  The flower is surrounded

by overlapping bracts and sepals from which the end of the purplish-red corolla tube projects.  It is broadest in

the middle, tapering at both ends.

At the northern end of the species range the plants are taller, with longer leaves and flowers.  Further taxonomic

work is required.



Flowering Period:  July-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from several populations in the metropolitan area, extending north into the Moora District as far as

Badgingarra.

Grows on grey or yellow sandy soils of the coastal plain, usually in banksia woodland.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. S of Badgingarra

D

MRWA Road Verge 14.8.1991



1

Undisturbed

2.* Koojan

Mo

-



20.9.1976

-

-



3. N of Cataby

D

National Park



12.6.1988

-

-



4. NW of Regans Ford

D

Nature Reserve



10.9.1988

-

-



5. E of Cataby

D

Private



16.9.1988

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Regenerates after fire.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind populations 2-5 and complete full surveys.

-  Further taxonomic research is required to elucidate differences between the populations at the north of the

range and those further south.



References

Kelly 


et al. (1993), Marchant et al. (1987).

477

Cryptandra nudiflora F.Muell.

RHAMNACEAE

Wedge-leaved Cryptandra

A low shrub about 30 cm tall with spreading branches which are rigid and with short branchlets sometimes

ending in spines.  The leaves are linear-cuneate, with a broad apex, sometimes bilobed, and tapering towards the

base.  They are up to 12 mm long.  The flowers are clustered along the branches on pedicels ca. 3 mm long.  The

calyx is tubular, the short lobes and tube glabrous, ca. 4 mm long.  It is deep pink in colour, bell-shaped, as long

as the five hooded petals.  The disc and ovary are glabrous.



Flowering Period:  July-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species was originally collected from Port Gregory and the Murchison River and is known from several

populations in the Geraldton District in the Northampton to Port Gregory area.  However, the species has been

collected twice from the Moora District in the Koojan area, south of Moora.  There are no records of the habitat

in which it was found in the Moora District.  Near Northampton it grows in shallow clay loams or sandy clay,

often associated with sheet granite, in winter-wet areas, growing amongst low heath.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* S of Koojan

VP

-

17.8.1978



-

-

2.* Near Koojan



VP

-

9.9.1969



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required in the District for this species.



References

Bentham (1863), Blackall and Grieve (1985).



478

Daviesia epiphyllum Meisn.

FABACEAE


Staghorn Bush

A spreading leafless shrub to 1 m tall.  The stems are flat, broadly winged and glaucous.  They are pinnately

lobed with triangular to lanceolate, pungent lobes and are up to 2 or 3 cm broad.  The flowers are in few-

flowered clusters on the branches.  The calyx has short, broad teeth and the flowers are scarlet to orange-scarlet

in colour, to 2 cm or more in length.  The pod is triangular in shape, ca. 2 cm long with a long pungent point.

Flowering Period:  May-July

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is endemic to the Moora District, occurring in the Lesueur area and Gairdner Range, north to

Eneabba, south to Badgingarra and east to the Boothendarra area, a range of ca. 50 km.

Grows on lateritic uplands, sometimes above breakaways, in pale brown loam or sandy clay or white sand in

scrub, or low heath often with emergent mallees, including 

Eucalyptus drummondii, E. gittinsii, Calothamnus

species


 and Dryandra aff. falcata.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.

S of Eneabba



Ca

Nature Reserve

28.8.1991

1

Disturbed



2.

E of Mt Lesueur

D

Private


1991

20

Undisturbed



3.

NE of Badgingarra

D

Shire Road Verge



29.4.1992

1

Undisturbed



4.

Mt Peron


Co

National Park

26.4.1993

Frequent-WH

-

5.

Coomallo



D

Nature Reserve

18.11.1992

10+


Undisturbed

6.

Cadda Road



D

Shire Road Verge

30.5.1994

10+


Growing on and

around gravel

scrape

7.

N of Cockleshell



Gully

Co

Gravel Reserve



19.6.1989

1+

At edge of gravel



scrape

8.

SE of Mt Lesueur



D

Shire Road Verge

10.1990

10-20


-

9.* SW of Mt Lesueur

D

-

24.7.1969



-

-

10.* Brand Highway



Co

-

30.5.1980



-

-

11.* Mt Lesueur



D

National Park

22.7.1962

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



479

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in the Lesueur National Park.  The species is probably under-collected

owing to its winter flowering period.

References

Bentham (1864), Blackall and Grieve (1985), Crisp (1995).



480

Desmocladus elongatus L.A.S.Johnson & B.G.Briggs ms

RESTIONACEAE

[

Loxocarya elongata, Loxocarya sp. (B.Briggs 7481), Loxocarya sp. C]

An erect, tufted, rhizomatous sedge to 35 cm high.  It is usually glabrous, but sometimes with hairs.  The leaves

are yellow-brown in colour, reduced and scale-like, 15-20 mm long, enclosing a cluster of leaf-like branchlets.

The branchlets are often curved, 30-60 mm long.  The flowering spikelets are 7-10 mm long, the male

inflorescences broader than those of the female inflorescences and paler in colour.

Flowering Period:  August-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from Eneabba south to Dandaragan.

Grows in grey to white sand with laterite, or red-brown sandy clay over laterite, on slopes and uplands in heath.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.

Coomallo



D

MRWA Road Verge 14.8.1991

1

Undisturbed



2.

W of Dandaragan

D

Shire Road Verge



2.7.1992

5+

Partly disturbed



3.

Alexander Morrison Co

Shire Road Verge

5.11.1992

5+

Partly disturbed



4.

N of Badgingarra

D

Shire Road Verge



6.11.1992

23

Partly disturbed



5.

NE of Badgingarra

D

Shire Reserve



10.12.1992

5+

Undisturbed



6.

S of Eneabba

Co

Nature Reserve



9.12.1992

10+


Partly disturbed

7.

E of Eneabba



Ca

National Park

5.11.1992

10+


Undisturbed

8.

S of Eneabba



Co

MRWA Road Verge,

Gravel Reserve

9.12.1992

50+

Some disturbance



9.* S of Hill River

D

-



25.9.1976

-

-



10.* S of Badgingarra

D

-



2.9.1970

Common-WH

-

11. Eneabba



-

-

10.1987



Common in

1984-WH


-

12. Badgingarra

D

Townsite Reserve



23.9.1988

-

-



13. Boothendarra Road

D

Shire Road Verge



7.11.1988

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



481

References

Marchant 



et al. (1987).

482

Desmocladus gigas L.A.S.Johnson & B.G.Briggs ms

RESTIONACEAE

[

Restio gigas ms]

A clumped, rhizomatous perennial herb 2-2.5 m tall and up to 1 m in diameter, with many erect stems.  The

leaves are soft and finely divided.  The male and female inflorescences are borne on separate plants.  The female

inflorescences are ca. 2 cm long, surrounded by several broad, grey-brown bracts with long pungent points and

edged with white woolly hairs.  The male inflorescences are numerous, in long compound panicles, each ca. 1 cm

long, brown in colour.



Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been recorded over a narrow range of ca. 25 km in an area between Eneabba and Badgingarra.

Grows in grey or pale brown lateritic sand, emergent from low heath, sometimes in open low woodland of

Eucalyptus todtiana.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Brand Highway 

Co

MRWA Road Verge



6.11.1992

60

Some disturbance



2. N of Tootbardie Road Co

Private


10.1992

-

-



3. N of Badgingarra

Co

National Park, Shire



Road Verge & VCL

8.11.1991

500+

Undisturbed



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



483

Dryandra echinata A.S.George PROTEACEAE

[

Dryandra sp. 7 (A.S.George 11703) [aff. polycephala]]

A spreading, much-branched shrub to 3 m tall, without a lignotuber.  The branches are spreading.  The leaves are

dark green and dull on the upper surface and pale beneath.  They are narrow, 3-15 cm long, 6-15 mm wide with

9-25 triangular lobes on each side.  The flower heads are crowded towards the ends of the branches.  The bracts

are narrow, rusty brown at the apex, and pale below.  Each inflorescence is small, less than 4 cm in diameter.

The perianth is pale yellow, 17-23 mm long, the limb dark yellow, glabrous or with a few hairs near the base.

The pistil is 22-26 mm long, glabrous except for a few hairs on the ovary.

The specific name refers to the prickly habit of the plant.  

Dryandra echinata is related to D. polycephala but is

smaller and more compact, with broader leaves with larger lobes and larger flowers.



Flowering Period:  July-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species occurs mainly in the south of the Moora District between Regans Ford and New Norcia, extending

south into the Swan Region, where it occurs on a nature reserve north of Gingin with a population of ca. 150

plants and also in the Moore River National Park to the west of Wannamal.  A population was recorded from

much further north near Badgingarra in 1985.

Grows in lateritic gravel, clay loam or grey sand over laterite in low heath.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.

W of Mogumber



D

Shire Road Verge

24.11.1993

1+

On edge of road on



very narrow verge

2.

NE of Regans Ford



D

Nature Reserve

25.9.1991

100+


Undisturbed

3.

NE of Regans Ford



D

Nature Reserve

8.8.1991

1+

In restored quarry



4.

E of Regans Ford

G

Shire Road Verge



30.7.1991

110+


Above road cutting,

some plants dead

5.

E of Regans Ford



G

Shire Road Verge

30.7.1991

5

Road edge, damaged



by grading

6.

E of Regans Ford



G

Private


11.2.1994

22

Healthy



7.* New Norcia

VP

-



20.7.1920

-

-



8.* S of Mogumber

VP

-



1977

-

-



9.* Between New Norcia

and Gillingarra

VP

-

16.9.1973



-

-

10.* NE of Gillingarra



VP

Shire Road Verge

31.7.1983

-

-



11.* N of New Norcia

VP

-



9.1954

-

-



12. S of Dandaragan

D

Private



9.9.1988

-

-



13. N of Badgingarra

Co

National Park



1985

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


484

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

George (1996).



485

Dryandra pteridifolia R.Br. subsp. vernalis A.S.George PROTEACEAE

[

Dryandra sp. 22 (A.S.George 16779)]

Tangled Honeypot

A low shrub, forming clumps to ca. 40 cm with prostrate, underground stems.  The leaves are 50-120 mm wide,

pinnately divided almost to the midrib into linear segments with the leaf margins strongly rolled back, obscuring

the lower surface.  The involucral bracts are broadly ovate, the inner ones to 20 mm long, with obtuse apices.

They are stiff and tomentose, rusty red in colour.  The flowers are cream and pale gold in colour.  The perianth is

ca. 39 mm long.  The pistil is 40-45 mm long and the pollen presenter is ca. 8 mm long.

Differs from the typical subspecies, which occurs on the south coast, in the leaf lobes, which are not twisted, the

flowers, which are slightly larger, and in the flowering period, which is in spring, rather than in autumn.  The

subspecific name refers to the flowering period.

Flowering Period:  September-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from south of Eneabba to just north of the Moore River. 

Grows in sandy loam or grey sand over lateritic gravel in low heath or mallee heath.  Associated species include

Eucalyptus drummondii, Dryandra species and Hibbertia hypericoides.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Tootbardie Road

Co

-

25.9.1994



-

-

2. Marchagee Track



Co

Shire Road Verge

28.7.1994

20-30


-

3. S of Dandaragan

D

Nature Reserve



2.10.1988

-

-



4.* Dandaragan

D

-



8.1958

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Populations 1 and 3 should be refound and fully surveyed.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



486

References

George (1996), Griffin (1985).



487

Dryandra speciosa Meisn. subsp. macrocarpa A.S.George

PROTEACEAE

Shaggy Dryandra

An erect, bushy shrub 1 to 2 m in height with tomentose branches.  The leaves are very narrow, and linear, 5-10

cm long, with the margins closely revolute and without lobes.  The flower heads are pendulous, on the upper

branches and are surrounded by long narrow bracts with hairy margins, 40-50 mm long.  The flowers are pale

yellow to pinkish-brown, the perianth is 24-30 mm long. 

Dryandra speciosa subsp. speciosa occurs near Tammin and has 85-115 flowers in the head, and the follicles are

18-21 mm long.  



D. speciosa subsp. macrocarpa A.S.George occurs in the Moora District and has 65-75 flowers

in the head and has larger follicles, 24-25 mm long.

Plants in the Moora District tend to flower later, the flowers are more yellow than orange-red, the bracts are

narrower and the leaves are reticulate and hairy.  The separation of these subspecies is based on the number of

flowers in the inflorescence and fruit size, rather than the other differences which are not consistent.



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