Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



513

References

Bentham (1870), Kelly 



et al. (1993), Marchant et al. (1987), Sainsbury (1987).

514

Isopogon tridens F. Muell.

PROTEACEAE

Three-toothed Coneflower

An erect, bushy shrub to 1.2 m tall.  The leaves are flat, narrow-cuneate, usually three-toothed at the apex.  They

have a long petiole, are thick in texture, and are 3-7 cm long.  The flowers are white to purple in colour.  They

are grouped in terminal, sessile heads which are depressed globular in shape with a convex receptacle.  The

inflorescence is surrounded by bracts which are numerous and overlapping.  The perianth is glabrous.  The pollen

presenter is spindle-shaped.  The exposed tips of the cone-scales are white-woolly and the nuts have a tuft of

hairs at the tip.

Flowering Period:  June-August

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species was searched for in the Eneabba area in 1981 by J. Lewis and it was reported to have been found at

84 sites, which were mapped, the species having a restricted distribution from Arrowsmith to south of Eneabba.

Lewis also reported that the species was more or less continuous throughout its range.  Its range has more

recently been found to extend north-east to west of Yandanooka, population 2.  Many of the populations found by

Lewis occurred in an area north of Eneabba which has since been gazetted as a nature reserve (approx. 24

populations).  Others occur in a nature reserve and mining lease on Vacant Crown Land to the south of Eneabba

(Lewis 1981), but part of the area is mined and some populations may have been destroyed.  No voucher

specimens have been deposited at the Western Australian Herbarium to confirm these populations of 

Isopogon

tridens and the locations and population sizes were not recorded in Lewis 1981.  He noted that this species tends

to occur as solitary, widely separated plants.

Grows in white or grey sand over laterite in low open heath, or high shrubland.  Lewis found that it grows on

interdunal swales as well as the crests and slopes of dunes in undulating topography, and also occurred on pale

yellow and pinkish sand.  He listed a number of emergent species occurring in association, 

Eucalyptus todtiana,

Xylomelum angustifolium, Banksia attenuata, B. candolleana, B. hookerana, B. menziesii, B. sphaerocarpa and

Hakea obliqua.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* S of Eneabba

Ca

VCL (Mining Lease)



27.4.1978

-

-



2.* W of Yandanooka

Mi

-



4.8.1983

-

-



3.* Eneabba-Carnamah Road

Ca

-



3.8.1983

-

-



4.* S of Eneabba

Co

-



20.7.1978

-

-



5.* SE of Lake Indoon

Ca

-



16.12.1976

-

-



6.* SW of Eneabba

Ca

-



14.8.1972

-

-



7.* W of Three Springs

TS

-



1.11.1974

-

-



8.* Arrowsmith

I

-



28.6.1970

-

-



9.* NE of Lake Logue

Ca

-



27.8.1948

-

-



Response to Disturbance

It was found that this species did not show preference for disturbed areas (Lewis 1981).



515

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in reserves to the north and south of Eneabba where the species was

recorded by Lewis.  If found to be as common as indicated by Lewis in those areas, it should be removed

from the Priority Flora List.



References

Bentham (1870), Blackall and Grieve (1988), Lewis (1981), Mueller (1868).



516

Jacksonia anthoclada Chappill ms

FABACEAE


[

Jacksonia sp. Mt Lesueur (E.A.Griffin 5571) sp. 42]

A tall, single-stemmed, leafless shrub to 2.5 m tall, the juvenile leaves are elliptic with dentate margins, reduced

to scale leaves as the stems become older.  The flowers grow singly on short stalks on the flattened stems.  The

calyx is split to the base, with silky grey hairs on the outside of the lobes, which are recurved at flowering.  The

flower has yellow-orange petals, the standard is wider than tall, with red markings.  The fruit is a broadly

elliptical pod with long woolly hairs and is covered by the calyx during development.

Differs from 

Jacksonia densiflora in the presence of flowers on the phylloclades.

Flowering Period:  November-April

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from south of Eneabba to south of Dandaragan.

Grows in white or grey sand over laterite in heath with species of 

Adenanthos and Banksia.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.

N of Tootbardie Road



Co

-

14.3.1990



-

-

2.



N of Coorow-Greenhead Road

Co

-



25.4.1992

-

-



3.

N of Wongonderra Road

D

-

29.4.1992



-

-

4.



S of Koonah Road

D

-



3.9.1992

-

-



5.

Banovich Road

D

-

12.12.1991



-

-

6.



Banovich Road

D

-



12.12.1991

-

-



7.

N of Banovich Road

D

-

25.4.1992



-

Seedlings present

8.

S of Halfway Mill Roadhouse



Co

-

12.12.1991



-

-

9.* SE of Eneabba



Co

-

23.12.1980



-

-

10.* SE of Eneabba



Co

-

30.4.1980



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



517

References

J. Chappill (personal communication).



518

Jacksonia carduacea Meisn.

FABACEAE


An erect, bushy shrub to 50 cm tall, with straight, erect branches.  There are numerous thick, rigid leaf-like

branchlets, which are flat, sessile, cuneate-oblong in shape, with prickly toothed edges.  They are up to ca. 2.5 cm

long.  The flowers are in heads, which are sessile in the axils of the upper phyllodes and are somewhat hidden,

being shorter than the phyllodes.  The flower stalks are very short, the calyx has long, silky hairs and the narrow

lobes have long narrow points.  The petals are nearly equal in length and are shorter than the calyx, which is ca.

12 mm long.  The flowers are yellow or yellow and red in colour.  The fruit is a pod.



Flowering Period:  August-January

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs between Watheroo, Alexander Morrison National Park and south-east of Badgingarra.

Grows in grey sand or sandy clay in low heath, sometimes beneath low open woodland of 

Eucalyptus todtiana,

and with 



Eremaea pauciflora and Adenanthos cygnorum.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Watheroo West Road 

D

-

7.11.1988



-

-

2. Alexander Morrison



Co

National Park

20.10.1987

Occasional-WH

-

3.* S of Badgingarra



D

Nature Reserve

5.11.1975

-

-



4.* W of Watheroo

-

-



11.1967

-

-



5.* NE of Badgingarra

D

-



14.12.1962

-

-



6.* W of Watheroo

D

-



9.1962

-

-



7.* Watheroo

Mo

-



4.11.1954

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Bentham (1864), Meisner (1855).



519

Kunzea incognita Toelken ms

MYRTACEAE

An erect shrub to 2 m tall with white hairs on the branches.  The leaves are elliptic to spathulate in shape,

arranged closely on the branches.  The flowers are in terminal, globular heads to 2.5 cm in diameter with many

flowers in each.  The petals are pink.  The fruits are campanulate, arranged in long clusters around the branches

in the axils of the leaves.



Flowering Period:  September-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Endemic to the Moora District where it occurs from Watheroo to Moora.

Grows in clayey sand or lateritic soil, sometimes with chert.  Occurs in open scrub or heath.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. NW of Watheroo

Mo

National Park



20.9.1991

150+


Partly disturbed,

heavy recreational

use

2. NW of Watheroo



Mo

National Park

20.9.1991

9

Undisturbed



3. N of Watheroo

Mo

MRWA Road Verge 17.10.1991



4

Undisturbed

4. SW of Moora

D

Shire Road Verge



19.9.1991

2

Undisturbed



5. SW of Moora

D

Shire Road Verge



15.10.1991

2

Disturbed



6. N of Moora

Mo

Railway Reserve



16.10.1991

15

Undisturbed



7. SW of Watheroo

Mo

Private



16.10.1991

317


Undisturbed

8. SW of Gunyidi

Mo

Nature Reserve



9.10.1992

-

-



9. W of Moora

D

Shire Reserve



15.10.1991

Occasional-WH

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.  Most populations are small and several are on road verges. 

-  Further taxonomic work is required.


520

Lasiopetalum lineare Paust

STERCULIACEAE

An erect, multistemmed shrub to 40 cm tall.  The leaves are alternate, narrowly linear in shape, 20-40 mm long,

1-4 mm wide.  The flowers are in leaf-opposed cymes with about eight flowers, contracted into loose heads.

The calyx lobes are linear, the bracteoles are equal to or longer than the calyx, thread-like, ca. 4 mm long.  The

calyx is lilac in colour, with white stellate hairs on the outside, divided to the base into five linear-lanceolate

lobes. There are five orbicular petals ca. 0.5 mm long.  The five anthers are almost sessile and the globular 3-

celled ovary is covered with white stellate hairs.  The filiform style has reflexed stellate hairs.

Some populations, particularly those in the Eneabba area, appear to be intermediate with 

Lasiopetalum

drummondii, with the leaves shorter and broader than those of L. lineare and the flowers slightly larger.

Flowering Period:  July-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from Eneabba and Watheroo, south to the Badgingarra area and south of the Moora District in the Swan

Region.

Grows in white to grey sand in open scrub or open low banksia woodland.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. W of Brand Mudge Road

Co

Shire Road Verge



5.11.1992

4

Undisturbed



2. Cadda Road

D

-



7.12.1992

-

-



3.* Badgingarra

D

National Park



6.10.1981

Occasional-WH

-

4.* N of Eneabba



Ca

-

1.6.1980



-

-

5. Cooljarloo



D

-

1.1987



-

-

6.* Bibby Creek



D

-

14.10.1978



4

-

7.* S of Eneabba



Co

-

20.7.1978



-

-

8.* S of Badgingarra



D

Nature Reserve

5.11.1975

-

-



9.* S of Badgingarra

-

-



17.10.1969

-

-



10.*W of Watheroo

D

-



30.10.1966

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be high.



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

521

-  Further taxonomic work is required.

-  Further survey work is required.

References

E. Bennett and K. Shepherd (personal communication), Paust (1974).



522

Lepidobolus densus L.A.S.Johnson & B.G.Briggs ms

RESTIONACEAE

[

Lepidobolus sp. (B.Briggs 7770)]

A large, many-stemmed plant forming a dense tussock, to 40 cm high, with rhizomes. The stems are yellow-

green, glabrous and terete.  Each stem has pale chestnut sheathing bracts each with a pungent point.  The glumes

of the female flower heads are broad and pale chestnut in colour with a darker pungent point, and are edged with

white hairs.  Those of the male inflorescence are narrower, with a conspicuous, pale margin.

Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

In the Moora District this species is known from three populations on a nature reserve south-east of Coorow, and

from a population ca. 30 km further west on a road verge near the edge of a national park, where further survey

may well discover further populations.

The species is also known from Dirk Hartog Island, Shark Bay and Kalbarri.

Grows on yellow or grey sand with lateritic gravel or white grey sandy clay near lakes.  It occurs in open

shrubland or sandheath with 

Lepidobolus preissianus, L. chaetocephalus and species of Grevillea, Melaleuca,

Banksia, Acacia and Verticordia.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Marchagee

Co

Nature Reserve



3.11.1992

70

Partly disturbed



2. Marchagee

Co

Nature Reserve



3.11.1992

400+


Partly disturbed

3. Marchagee 

Co

Nature Reserve



17.10.1991

100


Undisturbed

4. SW of Coorow

Co

Shire Road Verge



5.11.1992

20

Partly disturbed



5.* N of Marchagee

Co

-



1.10.1984

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that road verge population is marked.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in Alexander Morrison National Park and in the Kalbarri area.



523

Lepidobolus quadratus L.A.S.Johnson & B.G.Briggs ms

RESTIONACEAE

[

Lepidobolus sp. (EA.Griffin 2093)]

A tufted, erect perennial sedge to 15-30 cm high with rhizomes.  The stems are light green, square and glabrous.

The sheathing bracts are pale brown, with a pungent point.  The female inflorescences have fewer flowers and are

smaller and less conspicuous than those of the male inflorescences and the styles are maroon.  The glumes on the

male inflorescence have long, pointed tips, giving the inflorescence a bristly appearance.  The anthers are cream

in colour.



Flowering Period:  August-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Grows in white, grey to yellow sand or sandy clay with laterite in open low scrub, or low heath with 



Calothamnus

sanguineus, Lambertia multiflora, Xanthorrhoea preissii and Dryandra species on breakaways and uplands.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.

Coomallo



D

Nature Reserve

2.7.1992

10

Undisturbed



2.

N of Cataby

D

Shire Road Verge



2.7.1992

30

Partly disturbed



3.

E of Badgingarra

D

Shire Road Verge



6.11.1992

20+


Some disturbance

4.

Brand Highway



Co

MRWA Road Verge 6.11.1992

20+

Some disturbance



5.* Badgingarra

D

Townsite Reserve



23.9.1988

-

-



6.* S of Eneabba

Ca

-



20.10.1978

-

-



7.* S of Cataby

D

-



9.7.1988

-

-



8.* E of Badgingarra

D

-



28.9.1984

-

-



9.* Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.7.1979

-

-



10.* W of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



1.9.1979

-

-



11.* SE of Badgingarra

D

-



10.9.1979

Common-WH

-

12.* N of Regans Ford



D

-

13.8.1972



-

-

13.* S of Cataby



D

?Gravel Reserve

4.9.1981

Fairly common-

WH

-

Response to Disturbance



One population was recorded on a previously burnt area.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

524

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind populations 5-13, and to survey further in the Lesueur area

where many populations have been reported but not vouchered.


525

Leucopogon oliganthus E.Pritz.

EPACRIDACEAE

This species was first collected by Diels and Pritzel from west of Moora in 1901 and from Dandaragan by C.A.

Gardner in 1920.



Leucopogon oliganthus is a low shrub to 70 cm high  The leaves are lanceolate, shortly hairy, with acute tips, 7

to 10 cm long.  They are 6-nerved on the lower surface and convex above.  The flowers are grouped in short few-

flowered spikes at the ends of short side branches.  There are five white tomentose petals.  The ovary is two-

celled and the style is short.



Flowering Period:  May-August, November-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Recent collections have been made from west of Moora south to the Cataby area and several other populations

have been found from just south of the Moora District in a nature reserve on the south side of the Moore River

and further south-west to the area north of Gingin.

Grows in grey sand over laterite, or sandy clay on hillslopes in low heath, often in very open woodland of

banksia, 



Eucalyptus calophylla or Nuytsia floribunda.


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