Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. W of Moora

D

Shire Reserve



27.6.1988

-

-



2.* S of Cataby

D

-



29.11.1974

-

-



3. N of Cataby

D

Camping Reserve



1.12.1992

-

-



4. SE of Cataby

D

Nature Reserve



10.7.1988

Scattered-WH

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Blackall and Grieve (1981), Diels and Pritzel (1904).



526

Melaleuca sclerophylla Diels

MYRTACEAE

A low shrub, prostrate to erect, to 1 m tall and up to 2 m in diameter, but usually smaller.  The leaves are

alternate and are covered with small tubercles.  They are thick and leathery, oblanceolate in shape, flat and 1-

nerved with a blunt tip, 1-2 cm long and ca. 2 mm wide.  The flowers are in terminal heads, the calyx tube and

lobes with white hairs.  The flowers are purple-pink in colour, with stamens less than 1 cm long, the anthers

golden.  The fruits are in globular clusters of small, cup-shaped capsules.

Similar to



 Melaleuca nesophylla, which has wider, non tuberculate, thinner leaves, and a glabrous calyx tube.

Flowering Period:  June-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

A population has been reported from north-east of Carnamah and the species has been collected recently from

north of Coorow south to Watheroo and Moora with an earlier record from New Norcia.  It is recorded from east

of the Moora District in the Ballidu-Wongan Hills-Manmanning area.

Grows in sandy soil with gravel, sometimes associated with chert or granite, in low heath or shrubs or low

wandoo woodland.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. SW of Gunyidi

Mo

Nature Reserve



9.19.1992

-

-



2. E of Moora

Mo

-



7.11.1990

-

-



3. N of Coorow

Co

-



19.9.1991

Frequent-WH

-

4.* New Norcia



VP

-

6.1924



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Blackall and Grieve (1980), Holliday (1989), Mollemans 



et al. (1993).

527

Myriocephalus appendiculatus Benth.

ASTERACEAE

White-tip Myriocephalus

An erect annual herb to 20 cm tall, with few branches and both woolly and glandular hairs.  The leaves are linear

to narrowly ovate, to 35 mm long, 5 mm wide.  The flowers are in a compound terminal head, up to 1.5 cm in

diameter.  There are several rows of white involucral bracts forming a ray around the yellow flower cluster.  Each

partial head has 4-6 flowers.  The fruits have small hairs.

Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

In the Moora District this species has been recorded from the Eneabba area with an early record from Gillingarra,

near the southern boundary of the District.  Outside the District it occurs much further north around Cue in the

Geraldton District, and to the south in the metropolitan area at Ellen Brook.  There is also a record from Cape

Arid.

In the Moora District it has been recorded growing in deep, coarse sand on a slope at one locality and in sandy



clay in low lying areas.  Near Cue it grows in red sandy loam at the edge of water pans or on areas which have

been previously wet.  In the metropolitan area it grows on clay soil of a winter swamp.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* S of Eneabba

Ca

VCL (Mining Lease)



18.9.1977

-

-



2.* W of Lake Indoon

Ca

Shire Recreation Reserve



8.9.1979

Dense colonies-WH

-

3.* Gillingarra



VP

-

13.11.1906



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Bentham, (1867), Kelly 



et al. (1993), Marchant et al. (1987).

528

Nemcia acuta (Benth.) Domin

FABACEAE


An open, low shrub to 1 m high.  The leaves are in whorls of three or four, sessile, narrowly elliptic in shape,

broadest at or below the middle.  They taper to the apex which has a pungent point, and they are up to 22 mm

long and 9 mm wide.  There is a pair of stiff stipules at the base of each leaf.  The flowers are in loose axillary

clusters, with three-lobed ovate bracts.  The standard petal is yellow and dark reddish-brown, to 12 mm long.

The wings and keel petal are reddish-brown.  The fruit is an ovoid hairy pod to 8 mm long.

This species is similar to 



Nemcia epacridoides which has broader leaves with a rounded to cordate base, and no

stipules at the base of the leaf stalk. 

Originally described as 

Gastrolobium, but since has been treated as Oxylobium for many years (Bentham 1864).

Marchant 



et al. (1987) reinstated the species as Gastrolobium on the basis of the ovule number, which is

consistently two.  In 1987 the classification of 



Gastrolobium was revised by Crisp and Weston, who transferred

all toxic species of 



Gastrolobium and Oxylobium to Gastrolobium and related non-toxic species to Oxylobium,

Callistachys or Nemcia.  Thus species of Gastrolobium  with trifid bracts and condensed inflorescences were

transferred to 



Nemcia.

Flowering Period:  August-September

Fruiting Period:  November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Most populations of this species are known from the western edge of the Darling Scarp and Range in the Perth

area, within the Swan Region.  It also occurs just north of Bindoon, and has been collected in the past from south

of Mogumber and from east of Regans Ford.  Both these records are on the southern boundary of the Moora

District.

Grows in shallow, heavy soils and lateritic gravel sometimes near granite boulders, in very open wandoo and

marri woodland, over open scrub.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* 70 mile peg, Geraldton Highway

-

-

1.9.1958



-

-

2.* 8 miles east of Regans Ford



-

-

26.8.1964



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Regenerates well from seed after fire.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



529

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required in suitable habit for this species in the southern part of the Moora District and

adjoining parts of the Swan Region.

References

Bentham (1864), Crisp and Weston (1987), Marchant 



et al. (1987).

530

Olax scalariformis A.S.George

OLACACEAE

A spreading, diffuse shrub to 70 cm tall with flattened young branchlets, which are slightly zig-zag.  The leaves

are linear to narrowly ovate, concave, 2-6 mm long with a hooked tip.  They are in two opposite rows and fall

after the first year leaving prominent scars on the branches.  The floral leaves are little wider than the stem

leaves.  The calyx is very short and the corolla is white and five-lobed.  It has a few hairs at the base of the lobes

and is papillose in the throat.  There are three stamens and five staminodes which are bifid and papillose in the

lower half.  The fruit is fleshy with a hard seed and is 8-10 mm long.

This species is similar to 

Olax benthamiana which has a smaller fruit, shorter, broader floral leaves and a smooth

corolla throat.



Flowering Period:  October-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

O. scalariformis occurs in the Moora District from north of Eneabba to the Lesueur area.  It has also been found

to occur to the south of the District in the Moore River National Park and the Gingin area, and in the

metropolitan area at Forrestfield.

Grows in white-grey sand or sandy loam sometimes over laterite or limestone.  May occur in or near swamps or

open flats usually in open shrubland or open heath.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.*E of Jurien

D

-

3.12.1982



-

-

2.*E of Jurien



D

-

3.12.1982



-

-

3.*E of Jurien



D

-

3.12.1982



-

-

4.*S of Eneabba



Co

VCL (Mining Lease)

12.11.1976

-

-



5.*N of Arrowsmith River

-

VCL



4.8.1976

-

-



6.*N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



22.11.1979

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



531

References

George (1984a).



532

Patersonia argyrea D.A.Cooke

IRIDACEAE



Patersonia argyrea is a tufted herb with several basal linear leaves which are biconvex and have sheathing bases.

The leaves are 20-42 cm long, the leaf surface with deep, pilose grooves, the margins and bases also with silvery

hairs.  The flowering stems are 20-35 cm long, leafless and covered with long soft hairs.  The inflorescence is

enclosed by two opposite spathes which are dark chestnut brown, sparsely silky, to 5.2 cm long.  The flowers

have three very small petals and three broad, spreading sepals, violet in colour.  There are three yellow stamens.

The plant has a silvery grey appearance and grooved biconvex leaves, which distinguishes it from other species.



Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs mainly in the Lesueur area but two other populations have been found recently, further south to the west

of Badgingarra.  This species is reported to occur at over fifty locations in the Lesueur area but is at present very

poorly represented in the Western Australian Herbarium by only six collections (E. Griffin, personal

communication).

Grows in grey sand or brown loam and lateritic gravel in open low heath, sometimes in open low marri

woodland.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Banovich Road

D

Shire Road Verge



18.11.1992

5

Disturbed



2. Cadda Road

D

Shire Road Verge



20.10.1992

3+

Disturbed, on



graded road edge

3.* N of Mt Benia 

-

-

23.9.1979



-

-

4.* Mt Lesueur



D

National Park

4.11.1962

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required to map the full distribution of the species, particularly in the Lesueur area.



References

Cooke (1984, 1986).



533

Persoonia pungens W.Fitzg.

PROTEACEAE

An erect, spreading to almost prostrate shrub to 0.8 m tall with branchlets which are white-tomentose when

young.  The leaves are glabrous, narrow-elliptic or narrow-oblong and pungent, and sometimes twisted.  They are

one-nerved, 0.5-15 mm long, and 1-5 mm wide.  The flowers are in 1-5 flowered terminal or axillary

inflorescences.  They are glabrous, and the tubular perianth is symmetrical with four lobes, and is bright yellow

in colour.  The anthers have no appendage and are shorter than the perianth.  The ovary is glabrous and the

gynoecium is as long as the stamens.

This species differs from all others in the combination of the characters of anthers without appendages, glabrous

tepals, the pungent leaf and the leaf shape and size.



Flowering Period:  September-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs in the Moora District from Coorow southwards and south-east of the District to Dowerin and

Kellerberrin.  It occurs on three nature reserves.

Grows in white or grey to yellow sand to loam, in heath and sometimes in very open woodland, usually on flats

or lower slopes, often near lakes.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Pinjarrega

Co

Nature Reserve



23.8.1992

5+

Undisturbed



2. SW of Coorow

Co

Private



7.1.1992

100+


In area of regeneration

after burning and

ploughing 5 years

previously

3.* Piawaning

VP

-



10.12.1982

-

-



4.* N of Watheroo

-

-



17.12.1980

-

-



5.* SW of Winchester

-

-



9.9.1969

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Regenerates from a lignotuber after disturbance.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



534

References

Fitzgerald (1912), Weston (1994).



535

Persoonia rudis Meisn.

PROTEACEAE

An erect shrub to 1 m tall, sometimes somewhat spreading.  The leaves are linear, 1.5-4.5 cm long, to 1.4 mm

wide.  They are densely covered with long hairs when young, less so with age.  The leaves are concave, with no

prominent veins, and are sometimes grooved on the upper surface.  The flowers have a regular perianth, yellow in

colour, with hairy tepals.  The anthers are yellow and have an appendage.  The ovary is densely hairy and the

gynoecium is as long as the stamens.

This species is most similar to 



Persoonia filiformis but differs in the long, spreading hairs on the young shoots,

non-pungent, unribbed leaves, and exserted gynoecium with a hairy ovary.



Flowering Period:  October-January

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from north of Eneabba south to the Lesueur area and eastwards to north of Badgingarra.  It is reported to

occur commonly in the Lesueur area.  It also occurs on the southern boundary of the District between Regans

Ford and Mogumber, extending south into the Swan Region where it was recorded in 1974 between Muchea and

Bullsbrook.

Grows in yellow, grey or white sand or sandy loam and laterite in very open shrub mallee and low scrub, and in

open marri woodland in the south of the District.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. N of Eneabba

I

VCL


21.1.1992

-

In burnt heath



2. S of Eneabba

Co

Nature Reserve



6.11.1992

2+

Undisturbed



3.* Cockleshell Gully

D

National Park



22.9.1979

-

-



4.* NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



11.10.1979

-

-



5. E of Regans Ford

D

Public Utilities Reserve



1991

-

-



6.* N of Coomallo

Co

-



21.10.1966

-

-



7.* Mt Peron

D

-



11.10.1951

-

-



8.* W of Mt Peron

D

-



15.11.1971

-

-



9.* Mogumber

VP

-



11.1930

-

-



10.*W of Three Springs

TS

-



1.11.1974

-

-



11. Alexander Morrison

Co

-



1991

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Regenerates after fire (population 1).



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



536

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required in the Lesueur area, also in the area north of Badgingarra and in the south of the

District between Regans Ford and Mogumber.

References

Leigh 


et al. (1984), Weston (1994).

537

Petrophile biternata Meisn.

PROTEACEAE

A many-stemmed, rigid shrub to 1.6 m tall.  The leaves are mid-green, and rigid, divided pinnately into three or

five segments, the lower ones divided again into two or three lobes.  The lobes are flat and pungent-pointed, to 4

cm long.

The flowers are cream to yellow, glabrous and viscid, ca. 10 mm long, with an orange pollen presenter.  They are

grouped in sessile, ovoid, terminal heads.  The cone scales are grey and viscid, particularly the outer ones.  The

inner ones are densely villous with a glabrous tip.

Two taxa described by Sainsbury (1987) as 

Petrophile sp. from east of Jurien and P. sp. aff. biternata from north

of Mogumber are regarded by Foreman (1990) as referable to 



P. biternata.

Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from Eneabba and Coorow, south to New Norcia.  Grows in lateritic gravel and yellow to grey sand with

mallees in shrubland, or in quartzite or pale loam soil, sometimes on slopes or ridges.  In the south of the range it

grows in open, low woodland of 



Eucalyptus wandoo over low heath or scrub

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Gillingarra 

VP

Nature Reserve



9.11.1990

Uncommon-WH

-

2. N of Badgingarra



D

-

1.9.1984



Scattered-WH

-

3. S of New Norcia



VP

-

14.9.1984



Common-WH

-

4. SE of Eneabba



Ca

-

6.9.1984



Common-WH

-

5. N of Eneabba



Ca

-

3.9.1984



-

-

6.* E of Jurien Bay



D

-

18.9.1976



-

-

7.* Between Eneabba and Coorow



Ca

-

24.9.1962



-

-

8.* N of Marchagee 



Co

-

29.9.1966



-

-

9.* S of Marchagee



Co

-

31.8.1965



-

-

10.*N of Marchagee



Co

-

5.9.1957



-

-

11.*Moora



Mo

-

30.9.1946



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

538

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind several populations recently reported (R. Sainsbury, personal

communication).

References

Bentham (1870), Foreman (1990), Sainsbury (1987).



539

Petrophile plumosa Meisn.

PROTEACEAE

An erect shrub to 1.3 m tall with minutely hairy branches.  The leaves are linear and spathulate.  They are either

entire or divided into three flat, pointed lobes.  The outer cone scales have white, ciliate margins.  The flowers

are yellow, in terminal, depressed globular heads.  Each flower is ca. 2.5 cm long, very villous.  The style has a

spindle-shaped pollen presenter. 



Flowering Period:  July-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from a small area north of Mogumber and to the south-east.  There is also an old record from south of

Mogumber.  The species is represented by large populations on three nature reserves but occurs over a range of

less than 25 km.

Grows in loam and laterite on hills, also on lower areas, in shrubland or heath.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey No. of Plants

Condition

1. E of Mogumber

VP

Nature Reserve



10.9.1991

50+


Undisturbed

2. Gillingarra

VP

Nature Reserve



8.8.1991

50+


Undisturbed

3. S of Gillingarra

VP

Railway Reserve



1984

1200


-

4. N of Gillingarra

VP

Railway Reserve



1984

500


-

5. Gillingarra

VP

Nature Reserve



1984

3500-4000

-

6. Koodje



VP

Nature Reserve

1984

500


-

7.* Between Mogumber and Gingin

-

-

9.1932



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Blackall and Grieve (1988), Sainsbury (1987).



540

Phlebocarya pilosissima (F.Muell.) Benth. subsp. pilosissima HAEMODORACEAE

A tufted perennial herb to 40 cm, with a short stem and leaves to 35 cm long.  The larger leaves are flattened, to

2 mm wide and hairy on the margins and usually on both surfaces.  The bracts are also hairy along the margins.

The flowers are creamy-white in colour, with three petal-like sepals and three petals.  There are six stamens with

the anther connective somewhat longer than the locules.  The style is divided into three at the tip, with three

stigmas.


This subspecies differs from sub species

 teretifolia in its flattened, hairy leaves.  In the latter, the leaves are terete

and glabrous apart from cilia on the margins on the upper 1-2 cm. 



Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Has been recorded in the past between Eneabba and Dandaragan, although the more recent collections have been

from the Badgingarra area.  There is also one record from the coastal plain south of Perth.

Grows in white, brown or grey sand over lateritic gravel, on slopes or in depressions between hills.  Occurs in

low heath, sometimes beneath open, low woodland of 

Eucalyptus todtiana and  Banksia  species.  Other

associated species include 



Hakea prostrata, Isopogon linearis and Conostylis species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. N of Badgingarra

D

Agricultural Research



Station Reserve

23.9.1988

-

-

2. Badgingarra



D

National Park

8.10.1985

-

-



3.* Willis Road 

Co

-



16.9.1982

-

-



4.* SSE of Eneabba

Co

-



17.10.1981

Common in area-WH -

5.* Marchagee Track

D

-



15.11.1984

-

-



6.* Hill River

D

-



17.8.1975

-

-



7.* SE of Badgingarra

D

-



10.9.1979

Common-WH

-

8.* E of Cervantes



D

-

8.7.1975



-

-

9.* S of Badgingarra



D

-

2.9.1970



Common-WH

-

10.*WSW of Coorow



Co

-

17.9.1976



-

-

11.*E of Jurien Bay



D

-

2.9.1976



-

-

12.*SW of Badgingarra



D

-

14.10.1978



-

-

13.*S of Eneabba



D

-

13.9.1970



-

-

14.*E of Eneabba



Ca

-

30.9.1966



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


541

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind and survey previously recorded populations.



References

Bentham (1873), Macfarlane (1987).



542

Rinzia crassifolia Turcz.

MYRTACEAE

Although first collected by James Drummond in 1849, there have been few collections since then and the most

recent was made in 1983.



Rinzia crassifolia is a low open, spreading or prostrate shrub to 20 cm tall and 40 cm in diameter.  The leaves are

linear to narrow-oblong, 2-9.5 mm long, slightly spreading and scattered on the branches.  The flowers are

solitary in the axils of the leaves, one to six or up to twelve on each shoot.  They are 7.5-11 mm across.  The

petals are white.  There are 10-12 stamens which form a cone around the style.  The seeds are verrucose, with

rounded ends, dark brown in colour, with an aril.

The verrucose seeds are distinctive within the genus.



Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from Calingiri north to the Watheroo area.  Also occurs outside the Moora District from the Perth area to

east of York.

In the south of the range, this species grows on lateritic rises in heath with thickets of 



Allocasuarina species and

wandoo.  Near Watheroo it has been recorded from sandy soil and chert, beneath scattered 



Allocasuarina

species.


Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* NW of Watheroo

Mo

-

9.9.1978



Scattered-WH

-

2.* SW of Calingiri



VP

-

8.9.1978



-

-

3.* N of New Norcia 



VP

-

18.8.1973



Rare-WH

-

4.* Between Bolgart and Calingiri



VP

-

28.9.1971



-

-

5.* W of Watheroo



Mo

-

9.1926



-

-

6.* Between Moora and Watheroo



Mo

-

13.9.1938



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is urgently required.



543

References

Marchant 



et al. (1987), Mollemans et al. (1993), Trudgen (1986).

544

Scaevola globosa (Carolin) Carolin

GOODENIACEAE

[

Nigromnia globosa]

A prostrate shrub to 70 cm high and 1 m in diameter, covered with a felt-like pubescence of yellowish-white

hairs, maturing to grey.  The leaves are scattered along the stems.  They are obovate to elliptic, 3-6 cm long.  The

inflorescence is a sessile, globular head in the axil of the leaf, to 15 mm in diameter, with the flowers buried in

the mass of soft hairs.  Each flower is ca. 3 mm long, the corolla yellow.  The fruit is up to 2 mm long, ribbed and

hairless.



Flowering Period:  October-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

In the Moora District this species occurs between Carnamah and Watheroo.  It has also been recorded from north

of Mingenew and between Geraldton and Mullewa in the Geraldton District and was described from the original

collection made between Yuna and Dartmoor, where it has recently been refound.

Grows in white-grey sand, sandy loam or clay in open shrubland.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  N of Watheroo

Co

Nature Reserve,



Private

28.8.1992

5000+

In area burnt 2-3 years



previously

2.  SSW of Carnamah Ca

Shire Road Verge

15.11.1990

200+

Plants regrowing on



graded road edge

3.  SW of Carnamah

Ca

Shire Road Verge,



Private

15.11.1990

120

Burnt a few years



previously

4.  SSW of Carnamah Ca

Shire Road Verge

15.11.1990

4

Plants partly dead



5.  S of Carnamah

Ca

Shire Road Verge



4.10.1990

6

Two plants alive, the



remainder dead,

senescence



Response to Disturbance

Growth of new plants is stimulated by fire and by soil disturbance.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Monitor known populations.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required on conservation reserves.



545

References

Carolin (1974, 1990b, 1992).



546

Schoenus benthamii F.Muell.

 

CYPERACEAE



A perennial herb to 45 cm tall, with compressed, ribbed stems, and basal leaves, which are usually shorter than

the stems and with a glabrous leaf sheath.

The inflorescence is of one spikelet or of up to ten spikelets which are 13-17 mm long, in a dense, terminal head,

with a leaf-like involucral bract which is erect and up to 220 mm long, appearing to form a continuation of the

stem.  The glumes are usually glabrous.  There is only one empty basal glumes or there may be none.  The

perianth segments are flat, white and 2.5-3 mm long.  There are three stamens, the anthers are 5-6 mm long.  The

fruit is a three-ribbed nut.

Flowering Period:  September-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known from Mogumber in the Moora District but also occurs south to the Swan Region and to

south of Busselton.

Grows in winter-wet areas in white sand or grey sandy clay over clay in low, open heath.  Associated species

include species of 

Tribonanthes.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Mogumber

VP

-

1.1967



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Bentham (1878), Marchant 



et al. (1987).

547

Stenanthemum reissekii Rye

RHAMNACEAE

[

Cryptandra sp. Mt Benia (G.J.Keighery 11080)]

This recently described species, was first collected by Charles Gardner in 1957.



Stenanthemum reissekii is an erect to decumbent shrub, to ca. 0.5 m tall, often growing entangled with other

shrubs.  The leaves are broad at the tip, narrowing towards the base, and are up to 2.4 cm long and 7 mm wide at

the broadest point.  They are papillate on the upper surface and on the lower surface they are densely clothed

with hairs which are rusty in colour on the young leaf, fading with age.  The flowers are cream in colour and are

clustered in dense heads at the ends of the flowering stems.  Each flower cluster is surrounded by broad chestnut

bracts fringed with long white hairs.  The flowers are ca. 4 mm long, densely hairy on the outside and tubular in

shape, with five short spreading lobes, each ca. 2 mm long. 

Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is known from a geographical range of ca. 40 km in the area from Jurien Bay to Badgingarra.

Grows in white sand over laterite, brown loam over laterite, yellow sandy loam or lateritic grey sandy gravel.

Occurs in low heath or dwarf scrub up to 1 m tall, sometimes in very open low woodland of 



Eucalyptus

calophylla or of mallee clumps.  It has been collected in upland areas, at the upper edge of a breakaway, on the

summit and slopes of mesas, and at the base of a sandstone ridge.  Associated species include 



Dryandra

carlinoides, Lambertia multiflora, Calothamnus torulosus and species of Melaleuca.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Coomallo

D

Nature Reserve



18.11.1992

10+


Undisturbed

2. Coomallo

D

Nature Reserve



11.9.1993

5+

Undisturbed



3. E of Jurien

D

Nature Reserve



21.10.1992

5+

Undisturbed



4. N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



6.10.1991

5+

Undisturbed



5. W of Badgingarra

D

National Park



8.10.1991

3+

Undisturbed



6. W of Badgingarra 

D

Road Verge



8.10.1991

 6+ 


Undisturbed

7. W of Badgingarra 

D

Shire Road Verge



20.10.1992

 20+ 


Partly disturbed

8. E of Badgingarra

D

Townsite Reserve



23.9.1993

-

-



9.* Mt Benia

D

Education Reserve



26.8.1989

Rare in area-WH

-

10.*W of Dandaragan



D

Nature Reserve

27.9.1988

-

-



11.*Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



13.10.1974

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


548

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

Rye (1995).



549

Thysanotus anceps Lindl.

ANTHERICACEAE

An upright herb to 50 cm tall, with 10-15 channelled, hirsute leaves present only in young plants.  The stems are

erect and are quadrangular at the base, becoming flattened higher up, and branching 3-4 times.  The purple

flowers are in terminal umbels.  Each has an erect stalk ca. 7 mm long.  The six perianth segments are 13-14 mm

long.  There are six anthers, three of which are 3.5-4 mm long and straight, the other three are 7-8 mm long and

curved.  All the anthers are twisted and dehisce by terminal pores.

Flowering Period:  October-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

In the Moora District this species is known from the Lesueur area south to Dandaragan.

It also occurs in the Perth Region and further east.  It grows in lateritic gravel, grey sand over laterite, yellow

sandy gravel or white sand over sandstone.  In the Moora District it grows in open, low heath and open

shrubland, sometimes with 

Eucalyptus haematoxylon.  Further south it has been recorded from woodland of

E. marginata and E. calophylla.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Coomalloo 

D

Nature Reserve



7.12.1979

-

-



2.* Mt Peron

D

National Park



23.11.1979

-

-



3.* NW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



22.11.1979

-

-



4. Dandaragan

D

Private



1991

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind all previously recorded populations and complete survey.



References

Marchant 



et al. (1987).

550

Verticordia amphigia A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

An open, branched shrub to 1.3 m tall.  The leaves are entire and slender.  The bracteoles are persistent, fringed

and boat-shaped.  The flowers are bright yellow, with 5-7 lobed sepals, which are 2-2.5 mm long and petals

which are 2.5 mm long.  The anthers are 0.3 mm long.  The staminodes are narrowly triangular and lobed and are

1.3-1.7 mm long.

Related to 

Verticordia chrysantha which has broader leaves, larger flowers, broadly linear staminodes, and larger

anthers.


The specific name is derived from the Greek

 amphigyos, meaning pointed at both ends, and refers to the boat-

shaped pair of bracteoles beneath each flower, which when dried sometimes resemble pixie ears.



Flowering Period:  October-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs south of Eneabba and in the Cockleshell Gully area.  All populations are in conservation reserves and are

of a reasonable number of plants.

Grows in winter damp sandy loam, clay or gravelly sand in low heath or scrub.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. S of Eneabba

Ca

Nature Reserve



12.9.1985

-

-



2. S of Cockleshell Gully

D

National Park



16.10.1984

-

Young plants in



burnt area

3. Cockleshell Gully

D

National Park



16.10.1984

-

-



4. W of Cockleshell Gully

Road


D

National Park

16.10.1984

-

Plants regenerating



from seed only

5.* Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



1.11.1973

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Regenerates from seed after fire.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly to refind and survey fully all previously recorded populations.



551

References

George (1991).



552

Verticordia densiflora Lindl. var. roseostella A.S.George

MYRTACEAE



Verticordia densiflora var. roseostella is an openly-branched shrub to 1.3 m tall with narrowly ovate floral leaves

1.5-2 mm wide.  The groups of flowers are small and rounded on stalks 2-4 mm long.  The flowers are pink or

pink and cream in colour, with sepals which are 2.3-2.6 mm long.

V. densiflora var. roseostella is distinguished from other varieties of V. densiflora by several characters.  The

pink or pink and cream flowers distinguish it from the most closely related variety 



stelluligera which has yellow

or cream flowers and occurs in the same area.  Its openly-branched habit and broad floral leaves distinguish it

from var. 

densiflora and var. cespitosa which both have pink flowers and occur further south. 

The varietal name refers to the rose-pink flower colour and its similarity to var. 



stelluligera.

Flowering Period:  October-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs in the Three Springs to Mingenew area in the north of the Moora District.  This variety extends further

north through the Geraldton District to the Kalbarri area.

It grows in deep sand and sand over gravel, in tall shrubland or heath.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. S of Mingenew

TS

-

30.10.1986



-

-

2. Bunny Road



TS

-

17.10.1984



-

-

3.* West Arrino



TS

-

1983



-

-

4.* NE of Three Springs



TS

-

3.10.1980



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

George (1991).



553

Verticordia huegelii Endl. var. decumbens A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

A slender shrub to 10 cm high and 30 cm wide with decumbent branchlets and a fire tolerant rootstock.  The

leaves are 3-6 mm long, 0.4-0.6 mm thick.  The creamy-white flowers turn maroon with age.  They have sepals

which are 7-8 mm long and petals 1.7-1.8 mm long.  The staminodes are ovate-lanceolate, acuminate and finely

fringed.  The style is 5 mm long, with white hairs and a golden yellow stigma.

This variety differs from other varieties of 

Verticordia huegelii in its fire tolerant rootstock, slender habit,

decumbent branches and smaller flowers.  It flowers later than the typical variety.



Flowering Period:  Late October-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

A collection thought to be var. 



decumbens  has been recorded from the Coorow-Greenhead Road east of the

Brand Highway.  There is also an earlier collection from Badgingarra.  Elsewhere it has been recorded from

granite outcrops from the Perth District east to Mount Saddleback, growing in shallow clay loams and gravel near

granite in low heath.  In the Moora District it is recorded from gravel and clay on gravelly ridges.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Coorow-Greenhead Road

Co

Private


9.1984

-

-



2.* Badgingarra

D

-



4.11.1964

-

-



Response to Disturbance

The rootstock is fire tolerant, unlike the typical variety which is killed by fire.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

George (1991).



554

Verticordia insignis Endl. subsp. eomagis A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

A slender, upright shrub to 1 m tall, with linear triquetrous leaves to 9 mm long.  The flowers are white to pale

pink, the petals with dark pink bases, so that the flowers have darker pink centres.  The sepals are 7-9 mm long,

deeply fringed, the basal reflexed lobes with upturned fringed tips forming a ring around the hypanthium.  The

petals are 3.5-5 mm long and are also fringed.  The stamens are 5-6 mm long and the style is 6-7 mm long. 

This differs from other subspecies of 

Verticordia insignis in its larger flowers, which have more concave petals,

and the staminodes are pale rather than red.  The staminodes have hairs on the inner surface which are very long,

almost reaching the style. 

Flowering Period:  September-early November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs between Eneabba and Coorow in the north of the Moora District south to the Badgingarra to Moora area.

Grows in white or grey sand over laterite, sometimes on lateritic rises, in heath, sometimes with emergent

mallees.


Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Wandawulla Road 

Mo

Gravel Reserve



3.11.1992

-

-



2. Tathra

Ca

-



5.11.1992

Frequent-WH -

3. N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



6.10.1991

20+


Undisturbed

4. SW of Moora

Mo

Shire Road Verge



14.9.1988

-

-



5. Boothendarra

D

Nature Reserve



25.9.1988

-

-



6. Marchagee Track

D

-



13.9.1985

-

-



7. NW of Dandaragan

D

-



31.10.1986

-

-



8.* Coorow Road

Co

-



15.10.1981

-

-



9.* Coorow Road

Co

-



23.10.1981

-

-



10.*Marchagee West Road

D

-



5.10.1981

A few plants

only-WH

-

11.*Coorow-Greenhead Road



Co

-

29.10.1981



-

-

12.*S of Coorow-Greenhead



Road

Co

-



23.9.1981

-

-



13.*WSW of Winchester

Ca

-



2.10.1980

-

-



14.*E of Brand Highway on

Coorow Road

Co

Private


8.1984

Frequent-WH -

15.*W of Coorow

Co

-



18.10.1981

-

-



16.*Alexander Morrison

Co

National Park



18.11.1978

-

-



17.*W of Coomberdale

D

-



2.11.1974

-

-



18.*Coorow Road

Co

-



19.10.1978

-

-



19.*WNW of Coorow

Ca

-



29.9.1979

Common-WH -

20.*Mt Peron

D

National Park



26.8.1949

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


555

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in the conservation reserves from which it has been recorded.



References

George (1991).



556

Verticordia luteola A.S.George var. luteola 

MYRTACEAE

An erect, open shrub to 1 m tall, without a lignotuber.  The leaves are elliptic-obovate and concave, with a ciliate

margin, and are up to 3.5 mm long.  The flowers are spreading, in spikes and are sulphur yellow, or yellow with

cream centres, and those in the most northerly population are described as greenish-white.  The hypanthium has

five green reflexed appendages.  The sepals are 5-6 mm long, with 7-9 fimbriate lobes and no basal auricles.  The

petals are 5-6.5 mm long without basal auricles and the petal fringe is fimbriate.  The stamens and staminodes are

glabrous, the stamens are 1.5 mm long, the staminodes are narrow, not clubbed.  The anthers are oblong, attached

basally and opening by slits.  The style is bearded below the apex. 

Related to 



Verticordia bifimbriata from which it differs in the flower colour, the sepals which have more

numerous lobes but lack auricles, the shorter stamens, and the more swollen reflexed appendages on the

hypanthium.

Flowering Period:  November-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from south of Dongara to west of Three Springs.  Grows in grey sand over gravel, or sandy clay, in open

low woodland of 

Eucalyptus todtiana, or open shrubland with Banksia attenuata and mallees and heath.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Nebru Road

TS

Shire Road Verge



9.11.1991

60+


Road verge weed

infested, some plants

growing on edge of

road 


2. SW of Three Springs

TS

MRWA Road Verge 9.12.1992



5

Undisturbed

3. W of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road Verge



9.12.1992

53

Some disturbance



4. Mt Adams Road

I

Shire Road Verge



9.12.1992

200+


Undisturbed

5. NE of Eneabba

TS

Shire Road Verge



1993

20 est.


-

Response to Disturbance

Some young plants at population 1 were growing in the scraped road edge.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly on conservation reserves and VCL within the known range of the

species.


557

References

George (1991).



558

Verticordia muelleriana E.Pritz. subsp. muelleriana

MYRTACEAE

An upright, slender shrub to 2 m with spreading, sparse branches.  The leaves are large, orbicular in shape, with a

narrow white margin.  The flowers are deep red to maroon in colour, fading with age.  The sepals are 5 mm long

and the fringed petals are 5 mm long including the fringe which is up to 1.5 mm long.  The staminodes are very

glandular and the style has a curved apex and a beard of hairs to 1.2 mm long, surrounding the style.

This variety is similar to subspecies 

minor which has smaller flowers and shorter style hairs.  It occurs east of

Geraldton.



Flowering Period:  Late October-early January

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from south of Three Springs to Coorow and Watheroo, with one record from south of Dalwallinu in the

Merredin District.

Grows in deep yellow, grey or white sand or sandy loam in tall shrubland.  Associated species include 



Banksia

prionotes, Xylomelum angustifolium, Verticordia densiflora and Actinostrobus sp.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1. Marchagee

Co

Nature Reserve



27.1.1994

200+


Undisturbed

2. SW of Carnamah

Ca

Shire Road Verge,



Private

8.1.1992


10+

Undisturbed

3. Dookanooka

TS

-



11.12.1988

-

-



4. E of Carnamah

Ca

-



17.10.1984

-

-



5. W of Coorow

Co

-



9.1984

-

-



6.* Namban West Road

Mo

Private



14.12.1982

-

-



7.* SW of Coorow

Co

-



29.10.1981

-

-



8.* S of Coorow

Co

Nature Reserve



16.1.1982

-

-



9.* WSW of Winchester

Ca

-



22.11.1980

Occurs over a

wide area-WH

-

10.*W of Marchagee



-

-

1.11.1982



2

-

11.*N of Marchagee



Co

-

5.12.1978



-

-

12.*SE of Coorow



Co

-

25.11.1959



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Survey fully the large population known on a nature reserve.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.


559

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required.



References

George (1991).



560

Verticordia rutilastra A.S.George

MYRTACEAE

An erect shrub to 70 cm tall.  The leaves are linear, almost terete.  The flowers are in corymb-like groups and are

bright yellow, ageing to red or bronze from the centre of the flower.  The bracteoles are united and persistent.

The sepals are 4.5-5 mm long and the petals are lobed and are 4 mm long.  The stamens have a divided

appendage and are 0.5-1 mm long.  The staminodes are fringed and the style is 0.2 mm long.

This species is closely related to 

Verticordia grandiflora and  V. nobilis.  However, it differs in its smaller

flowers, more fringed and smaller staminodes and in the shorter style.

The specific name refers to the appearance of the flower as it ages, turning red (from the Latin

 rutilus, red with a

metallic lustre) and the star-like appearance of the flower as the petals change in colour first (from the Latin



aster, a star).

Flowering Period:  October-November

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs from the Lesueur area and south-west of Coorow south to the Dandaragan area.

Grows in white or grey sand or sandy loam over laterite or sandstone, in heath and open mallee heath, with

Eucalyptus tetragona, Xanthorrhoea drummondii, Dryandra, Melaleuca and Beaufortia species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1. S of Koonah Road

D

Private



31.10.1986

-

-



2. NE of Mt Lesueur

D

-



15.10.1984

-

-



3. Coorow-Greenhead Road

Co

-



29.9.1985

-

Area burnt 5-



6 years ago

4. Coorow-Greenhead Road

Co

-

31.10.1985



-

-

5. N of Cockleshell Gully



D

-

16.10.1984



-

-

6. S of Warradarge Hill



Co

Private


16.10.1984

-

-



7. E of Mt Lesueur

D

-



15.10.1984

-

-



8.* N of Coomalloo

Co

Private



16.10.1981

-

-



9.* Marchagee West Road

D

-



5.10.1981

A few plants

only-WH

-

10.*Coorow-Greenhead Road



Co

Public Recreation

Reserve

18.11.1978



2

-

11.*Badgingarra



D

-

9.1965



-

-

12.*W of Moora



D

-

3.11.1954



-

-

Response to Disturbance

Population 3 had regenerated after fire with single and multiple upright stems.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



561

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly in conservation reserves within the range of the species.



References

George (1991).



562

Walteranthus erectus Keighery

GYROSTEMONACEAE

An erect, soft green shrub to 1.7 m tall, with linear to elliptic leaves which are semi-succulent, held erect, 5-8 cm

long, 4-7 mm wide.  The flowers are either male or female and are borne on the same plant, the female flowers

singly towards the ends of the branches and the male flowers in a terminal raceme.  There are 9-12 stamens in a

single whorl on the small, pedicellate male flowers.  The female flower is sessile in a leaf axil.  It is globular, ca.

2 mm in diameter and the stigma has 2-4 lobes, 3-4 mm long.  The fruits are barrel-shaped, indehiscent and

woody, 7-9 mm in diameter.



Flowering Period:  September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs in the Eneabba to Jurien Bay area, where it grows in sand over limestone.



Conservation Status

Current:  Priority 3



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.* Stockyard Gully

Ca

-

27.2.1974



-

“after fire”

2.* Eneabba Flora Reserve

Ca

-



12.9.1963

-

-



3.* N of Cockleshell Gully

D

-



16.9.1957

-

-



4.* S of Greenhead

Co

-



-

-

-



Response to Disturbance

Population 1 was recorded as occurring after fire.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.



Research Requirements

-  Further survey is urgently required.



References

Keighery (1985).



Illustration by G. Keighery.

Document Outline

  • moora_wmp28.pdf
  • moora_drf
  • moora_p1
  • moora_p2
  • moora_p3


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