Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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simple

undivided; 



of a leaf, not divided into leafletsof a hair or an inflorescence, not

branched


sinuate

with deep, wave-like depressions along the margin. cf. 



undulate

sinus

a notch or depression in the margin of an organ



solitary

of flowers, borne singly, not grouped in an inflorescence

spathe

a large bract ensheathing an inflorescence



spathulate (= spatulate)

spoon-shaped; broad at the tip and narrowed towards the base



species

a taxon comprising individuals, or populations of individuals, capable of

interbreeding to produce fertile offspring; the largest group of individuals

between which there are no distinguishable, consistent differences in form or

reproductive mechanisms

spike

an unbranched, indeterminate inflorescence in which the flowers are without

stalks. adj. 

spicate

spikelet

a unit of the inflorescence in grasses, sedges and some other monocotyledons,

consisting of one to many flowers and associated glumes

spine

a stiff, sharp-pointed structure, formed by modification of a plant organ, e.g. a

lateral branch or a stipule

spindle-shaped

broadest near the middle and tapering toward both ends



spinescent

ending in a spine; modified to form a spine



spinose

bearing spines



spiral

of leaves or floral organs, borne at different levels on the axis, in an ascending

spiral. cf. 



cyclic

stamen

the male reproductive organ of a flower, consisting of an anther and a filament



staminode

a modified stamen which is sterile, producing no pollen, often rudimentary



standard

the posterior petal in the flower in Papilionaceae



xxviii

stellate

star-shaped; consisting of star-shaped cells



stem

the main axis or a branch of the main axial system of a plant, developed from

the plumule of the embryo and typically bearing leaves

stigma

the pollen-receptive surface of a carpel or group of fused carpels, usually

sticky

stipe

a small stalk



stipule

one of a pair of appendages at the bases of leaves in many dicotyledons



stolon

a prostrate or trailing stem that produces roots at the nodes



striate

striped with parallel longitudinal lines or ridges



style

the usually narrowed portion of the pistil connecting the stigma to the ovary



subshrub

a small shrub



subulate

narrow and tapering gradually to a fine point



subterete

almost terete



sucker

a shoot originating from below ground



sulcate

grooved; furrowed



superior

attached above, as an ovary that is attached above the point of attachment of

the other floral whorls

taxon

a group or category, at any level, in a system for classifying plants or animals



tepal

a perianth segment in a flower in which all the perianth segments are similar in

appearance

terete

cylindrical or nearly so; circular in cross-section



terminal

at the apex or distal end



tessellate

with a chequered pattern



throat

of a corolla tube, the top, where the tube joins the lobes



tomentum

a covering of dense, matted, woolly hairs. adj. 



tomentose

tortuous

twisted or bent



torus

see 


receptacle

trifoliate

having three leaves



trigonous

three-angled



triquetrous

three-edged; with three protruding angles



truncate

with an abruptly transverse end, as if cut off



tuber

a storage organ formed by swelling of an underground stem or the distal end of

a root


xxix

tubercle

a small wart-like outgrowth



tuberculate

covered with tubercles



tuberous

swollen; of roots, tuber-like



turgid

swollen; expanded or inflated



umbel

a racemose inflorescence in which all the individual flower stalks arise in a

cluster at the top of the peduncle and are of about equal length

undulate

wavy, i.e. not flat. cf. 



sinuate

unisexual

bearing only male or only female reproductive organs



united

fused together



urceolate

urn-shaped



valve

one of the segments of a dehiscent fruit, separating from other such segments at

maturity

vein

a strand of vascular tissue



venation

the arrangement of veins in a leaf



verticillate

arranged in one or more whorls



vesicle

a bladder-like sac or cavity filled with gas or liquid



vestigial

reduced from the ancestral condition and no longer functional. cf.



rudimentary

villous

shaggy with long, weak hairs



viscid

of a surface, sticky; coated with a thick, syrupy secretion



whorl

a ring of leaves, bracts or floral parts borne at the same level on an axis



wing

a membranous expansion of a fruit or seed, which aids dispersal; a thin flange

of tissue extended beyond the normal outline of a stem or petiole; a lateral

petal of a flower in Papilionaceae



References

Harris and Harris (1994), McCusker (1981).



1

DECLARED RARE FLORA

2

A.

Extant Taxa

Acacia forrestiana E.Pritz.

MIMOSACEAE

Forrest's Wattle

Acacia forrestiana was first collected from near Dandaragan by Diels in 1901 and named by Pritzel in 1904

in honour of Sir John Forrest.  It is closely allied to 



A. huegelii, a species with a more southerly distribution

and with a different phyllode shape.  



A. forrestiana is an erect, hairy shrub growing to 1 m high and with

hairy branchlets.  The phyllodes are obtriangular, 1-2 cm long and 0.5-1 cm wide, with a midrib

intersecting the truncate, concave upper margin.  The flower heads are globular, pale yellow in colour.  The

pods are flat, red-brown, 3 cm long and 0.6 cm wide.



Flowering Period:  October-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is confined to lateritic hills and slopes between Dandaragan and Jurien Bay, a range of ca. 80

km.  It grows on laterite and clay loams in heath or low woodland of 

Eucalyptus wandoo and E. calophylla,

with associated scrub including 



Hakea lissocarpha and Grevillea, Acacia, Isopogon, Calothamnus and

Melaleuca species.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  Dandaragan

D

Private


25.9.1991

300


Good

2.  ENE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



19.4.1989

50+


Undisturbed

3.  ENE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



19.4.1989

250


Undisturbed

4.  E of Mt Peron

Co

National Park,



Private

19.4.1989

500+

Undisturbed



5.  E of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



19.4.1989

20+


Undisturbed, has not

been found recently

6.  SE of Mt Lesueur

Co

National Park



6.1989

50+


Undisturbed

7.  E of Mt Lesueur

Co

Private


6.1989

70+


Undisturbed

8.  N of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



13.6.1993

30+


Partly burnt, divided

by graded track, some

regeneration occurring

9.  NW of Dandaragan

D

Shire Road



Reserve

20.8.1993

10+

Relict vegetation, area



weed infested

10.  NNE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



8.12.1993

140+


Part of population

burnt, some seedlings

11.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



24.12.1993

100+


Undisturbed

12.  E of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



16.1.1994

100+


Undisturbed

13.  NE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



9.3.1994

300+


Undisturbed

3

1.*  SE of Dandaragan

D

Private 


21.9.1988

Small


population

Good condition



Response to Disturbance

The plants are killed by fire, regenerating from seedlings.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Maintain liaison with landowners and land managers.

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Record regeneration of burnt populations.

-  Ensure that markers are in place at population 9.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.


-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Survey population 14 from south-west of Dandaragan.

-  Conduct research on susceptibility to Phytophthora species.

References

Diels and Pritzel (1904), Hopper



 et al. (1990).

Illustration by B. Jones.



4

Acacia vassalii Maslin

MIMOSACEAE

Vassal's Wattle

Acacia vassalii was described in 1978 and named in honour of Dr Jacques Vassal.  At that time it was

known from only three collections, the earliest made from Wongan Hills in 1935, the others from unknown

localities. 

This species is a low spreading shrub up to 0.6 m in height, which forms a low, dense cushion up to 1 m in

diameter when growing in open areas, but is more diffuse and upright when shaded by other shrubs.  The

phyllodes are distinctive, 4-8 mm long by 1 mm wide, slightly horizontally flattened and with hooked tips.

The flower heads are yellow and globular and the pods are up to 2 cm long and 0.1-0.15 cm wide.

Flowering Period:  June-August

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from only four populations, one in the Wongan Hills area, Merredin District (population 1), and

three others in the Moora District, one to the east of Moora, the other two north-east of Watheroo, a total

range of ca. 85 km.  The population in the Merredin District which is located on an education reserve has

declined in recent years from eight plants to one.

Within the Moora District the southerly populations have been recorded over 7 km.  The main population

(population 2) occurs over 5 km on road and rail reserve.  A population of ten plants 2.5 km south of this

population (population 3) has not been refound recently despite several searches.  The location is on very

narrow road reserves with heavy weed infestation.  The most northern populations have been discovered

recently and require further survey.  



A. vassalii grows in low scrub and heath on brown sand with gravel

over laterite or on yellow sand.  Associated species include 



Allocasuarina campestris, A. drummondiana,

Dryandra frazeri, D. carlinoidesAstroloma serratifolium and Hakea and Drosera species.  The northerly

population grows with 



Actinostrobus arenarius, Ecdeiocolea monostachya and Grevillea integrifolia subsp.

biformis.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

2.  E of Moora

Mo

Shire Road Reserve,



Railway Reserve

30.7.1991

100 est.

Mainly good, some

disturbance and

weeds


3.  SE of Moora

Mo

Shire Road Reserve



11.7.1986

10 in 1986

Population has not

been found recently

4.  NE of Watheroo

Mo

Shire Road Verge



27.10.1992

-

Good



?Water Reserve

Response to Disturbance

5

Plants adjacent to the graded road edge and in open areas appear larger and healthier than those in shaded

situations, where they are often more diffuse, upright and partly dead.  Most plants at population 2 were

originally seen on or near a track between the road and railway.  The rail and road reserve where the

population occurs had been burnt annually prior to the discovery of the population.  This species is

probably a disturbance opportunist.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Maintain liaison with managers of land on which the population occurs.

-  Establish markers at population 4.

-  Weed control may be required at population 2.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.


-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Survey for new populations, primarily on reserves between the known populations in suitable habitat

particularly after fire or other disturbance.

-  Conduct research on fire response and susceptibility to Phytophthora species.

-  Survey population 4 to establish area of population, number of plants and land status. 

-  Further survey in the area of population 4 for new populations.



References

Hopper 


et al. (1990), Maslin (1978).

6

Acacia sp. Dandaragan (S.van Leeuwen 269)

MIMOSACEAE

Dandaragan Wattle

A tall, spindly shrub 1-4 m tall, or rarely a tree 5-6 m.  The branchlets are thick, slightly angled and

pruinose.  The phyllodes are glaucous, either oblong to elliptic, or falcate in shape, broadest near or above

the middle, 6-11 cm long and 3-7 cm wide.  The flower heads are oblong to globular, golden in colour and

are arranged in racemes 3-8 cm long.  Each flower head has 35-55 flowers.  The pods are up to 14 cm long

and 9-12 mm wide, flat and little constricted between the seeds.  This taxon has an affinity to 



Acacia

microbotrya with which it seems to intergrade.  It differs in the pruinose branchlets, raceme length, flower

head shape and colour, but there is a wide range of variation within the taxon.  It appears to be a good

species but its relationship with 

A. microbotrya needs to be clarified (B. Maslin, personal communication).

Flowering Period:  August-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from two populations, 8 km apart.  One large population in the Badgingarra-Dandaragan area is on

private land and a road reserve and is of 100+ plants, and the smaller population ca. 8 km further north is

on private land which is retained as a private nature reserve.  This population has not been fully surveyed

and at present has been noted only as being of a few plants.  At population 1 the taxon grows on a lateritic

breakaway system, in brown gravelly loam along the upper slopes of the breakaway.  The plants grow in

low woodland of 

Eucalyptus calophylla and E. loxophleba with low scrub including Xanthorrhoea species,

Hakea erinacea and Calothamnus quadrifidus.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  NW of Dandaragan

D

Private, Shire Road Reserve



26.9.1991

100+


Good

2.  NNW of Dandaragan

D

Private


1992

“a few”


-

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed not susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Assess the part of population 1 on private land to determine whether grazing is causing damage, and if

so, fence the population.



7

-  Protect populations from frequent fire, where possible, until fire response is known.

-  Continue efforts to acquire for a conservation reserve, part of the large road reserve on which

population 1 occurs.

-  Maintain liaison with landowners and local government authority.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Conduct electrophoretic research to elucidate the relationship with A. microbotra.

-  Conduct research to determine the fire ecology of the species and its susceptibility to Phytophthora

species.


-  Conduct further survey at population 2 to establish the full extent of the population, provide habitat

details and voucher specimens.



References

Hopper


 et al. (1990).

8

Anigozanthos humilis Lindl. subsp. chrysanthus Hopper

HAEMODORACEAE

Golden Catspaw

A robust herb, with flat, curved leaves to ca. 20 cm long, 15 mm wide.  The flowering stem is 20-40 cm

tall, with the flower head solitary on a simple or rarely once to twice-branched stalk.  The perianth is

tubular towards the base, with six lobes, the inner horizontal, the outer reflexed upwards.  It is yellow in

colour, with a dense covering of feathery hairs on the outside and is 2-3.5 cm long.  There are six stamens,

joined to the perianth near the base of the lobes at three levels on the perianth, the outer stamens being

lowest.  The style is up to 42 mm long.  The fruit is dry with several black seeds in each compartment. 

This subspecies differs from subsp. 



humilis in the shorter, uniformly yellow perianth, and in its taller

stature.  It intergrades with subsp. 



humilis to the north, south and west of its range.

Flowering Period:  September-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs in a small area at the foot of the Darling Scarp near Mogumber over a range of ca. 7 km.  The

southernmost part of the population extends into the Swan Region where it is well represented on a nature

reserve.  It also occurs to the west of Mogumber in the Swan Region on a nature reserve, road reserve and

private property and further south near Wannamal.  There is a population of 73 plants ca. 75 km further to

the south-east in the Swan Region on a shire reserve near Toodyay and an unconfirmed population ca. 20

km further south of this.

Grows in yellow brown or white sand, sandy loam or clay loam, in heath, sometimes below open low

banksia and eucalypt woodland.  Associated species include 

Banksia prionotes, B. menziesii, B. attenuata,

Eucalyptus calophylla, E. wandoo, Allocasuarina humilis and Hibbertia hypericoides.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  N of Mogumber

VP

Rail Reserve, MRWA



Road Reserve

28.9.1994

383

Burnt previous year,



some weed infestation

2.  N of Gillingarra

VP

-

1984



15

-

3.  Mogumber



VP

Shire Recreation

Reserve

2.7.1992


8

Good


Response to Disturbance 

Flowers best after dry-season fire.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

9

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Monitor populations at regular intervals.

-  Continue liaison with land owners and managers.

-  Conduct weed control at population 1 if necessary.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey to refind population 2 north of Gillingarra.

-  Conduct research on susceptibility to Phytophthora species.



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