Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



Yüklə 2,5 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə7/44
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü2,5 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   44

References

Hopper (1987, 1993), Hopper 



et al. (1990).

10

Anigozanthos viridis Endl. subsp. terraspectans Hopper

HAEMODORACEAE

Dwarf Green Kangaroo Paw

A dwarf rhizomatous herb with leaves which are subterete, 5-10 cm long and 0.1-0.2 mm wide.  The

flowering stem is 10-15 cm tall, not upright but arising at a 45-80 degree angle.  The flowers open away

from the flower stalk and are curved, with the margins parallel or constricted above the middle.  The six

lobes are reflexed and the flower is green in colour with a covering of feathery hairs on the outside of the

perianth.  This is 4.5-6 cm long and 4-5 mm wide at the narrowest point above the middle.  The six stamens

are in two rows, with the outer pair lower than the four inner stamens.  The seeds are grey-brown in colour.

Differs from subspecies 



viridis in the short flowering stems and the shorter, narrower flower.

Flowering Period:  August-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species has been found in an area west of Cataby in five populations over a geographical range of

about 20 km, but was not refound during this survey.  The areas in which it was known to occur had not

been burned recently and the species was not found at those localities, although it may have been present as

seed in the soil.  Two of the known localities were not visited as the locality descriptions are not precise,

and they were not refound with certainty.  Another population has been reported from north-west of Cataby

(population 4) but location information was not precise and it may have been one of the known

populations.

Occurs in winter-wet depressions where it grows on grey sandy clay loam or grey sand, in low post-fire

regenerating heath.  Occurs with 



Banksia  leptophylla, species of Melaleuca, Verticordia densiflora,

Conostylis species and sedges.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants Condition

1. & ?4. Emu Lakes

D

Private



13.11.1979

< 100

-

2.



SW of Emu Lakes

D

Nature Reserve



22.10.1980

210+


-

3.

SW of Emu Lakes



D

VCL


22.10.1980

200+


-

5.

Wongonderra Road



D

Private, Shire Road

Reserve

20.9.1989



500+

Vigorous,

dieback present

near this locality

in 1989

6.

Wolka Road



D

VCL (Mining Lease),

Shire Road Reserve

19.12.1988

800-1000

Flowered in

1988, not seen

since


Response to Disturbance 

11

Present at population 6 only on a disturbed firebreak.  Flowers best after a dry season fire and is a short-

lived post-fire opportunist, regenerating from seed.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


12

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that road markers are in place at populations 5 and 6.

-  Monitor populations regularly, particularly after fire.

-  Liaise with landowners and land managers at populations 1, 5 and 6.

-  Monitor progress of dieback in relation to population 5.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Conduct further survey for new populations in suitable habitats, particularly after fire.

-  Resurvey populations 1-3 and 6 and obtain accurate grid references for these populations.

-  Research is required on the fire response of the species.

-  Conduct research on susceptibility to Phytophthora species.

References

Hopper (1987, 1993), Hopper 



et al. (1990).

13

Asterolasia drummondii Paul G.Wilson

RUTACEAE


Gairdner Range Starbush

This species was first collected from Mt Lesueur by James Drummond in 1854 and was rediscovered there

by Charles Gardner in 1949.  It was included in Bentham's "Flora Australiensis" (1863-1878) as

Asterolasia phebalioides after earlier descriptions as Urocarpus phebalioides (1855) and Eriostemon

drummondii (1859).  Gardner (1931) listed it as Pleurandropsis phebalioides.  In 1971 it was regarded by

Wilson that 



Urocarpus  had priority, having been published first, and the combination Urocarpus

phebalioides was made.  The species was known by this name until 1987 when the nomenclatural change

was made to 



Asterolasia drummondii as a result of further evidence that Asterolasia had been published

several months before its synonym 



Urocarpus.

A. drummondii is an erect single stemmed shrub to 45cm tall, with the flowers, stems and leaves having

brown star-shaped hairs.  The leaves are up to 2 cm long and 1 cm wide, oblong or ovate in shape.  The

flowers have stalks 1-2 cm long and are clustered in the upper leaf axils, or terminally.  Each flower is ca. 1

cm in diameter and has five white petals.  There are ca. 10-15 yellow stamens.  The fruit consists of two

beaked carpels.

Flowering Period:  July-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Occurs between Dandaragan and the Gairdner Range near Jurien, where it grows on lateritic hills in sandy

clay or loam in low heath, or in the understorey of open woodland of 

Eucalyptus drummondii or E. lane-

poolei.  Associated shrubs include species of Calothamnus, Dryandra, Petrophile, Acacia and Hakea.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SE of Cataby

D

Nature Reserve,



Gravel Reserve,

Shire Road Reserve

30.7.1991

5000+


Good, rehabilitation

work carried out in

gravel reserve

2.  NE of Mt Lesueur

Co

National Park



19.4.1989

1000+


Good, near

boundary firebreak

3.  NE of Mt Michaud

D

National Park



23.9.1992

500+


Good, undisturbed

4.  Mt. Michaud

D

National Park



?1986

500 est.


-

5.  Mt. Lesueur

D

National Park



?1986

30

-



6.  SE of Mt Peron

D

National Park



6.1989

1500+


Recently burnt

7.  SE of Cockleshell

Gully

D

National Park



?1986

50 est.


-

8.  NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



6.1989

400+


-

                                                     

#

 now Priority 4 (updated at December 1999)



14

9.  NNW of Cockleshell

Gully

D

National Park



6.1989

20+


-

10.  W of Dandaragan

D

Private


20.9.1988

Common-WH Good



Response to Disturbance

Has regenerated well in a disused gravel pit, and on firebreaks in other areas, appearing to be a disturbance

opportunist.  Thought to be killed by fire, regenerating from seed.


15

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Liaise regularly with landowners and land managers.

-  Ensure that population 2 is protected during firebreak maintenance activities.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Survey population 10 to establish number of plants and extent of population.

-  Resurvey populations in the Lesueur National Park to establish current population sizes.

-  Conduct research on the susceptibility of this species to Phytophthora species.

-  Conduct research on population biology and fire response.

References

Bentham (1863-1878), Gardner (1931), Hooker (1855), Mueller (1859), Perry (1971), Rye and Hopper

(1981), Wilson (1971, 1987).


16

Banksia tricuspis Meisn.

PROTEACEAE

Lesueur Banksia, Pine Banksia

A small tree or shrub to 4 m in height with grey-brown bark.  The foliage is distinctive, the leaves are

crowded and scattered, pine-like in appearance, each leaf 10-15 cm long and 0.1-0.2 cm wide, with inrolled

margins and a notched tip which is roughly three-pointed, a character reflected in the name of the species.

The flowering cones are cylindrical, and up to 20 cm long and 10 cm in diameter.  The flowers are bright

yellow in colour.  The fruiting cones shed the dead flowers to expose numerous smooth follicles.

This is a distinctive species, distinguished by its tree-like, stunted habit, the leaves which are linear, each

having a three-toothed apex, and which are crowded at the ends of the branches, and by the conspicuous,

golden inflorescences.

Flowering Period:  May-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Restricted to rocky slopes, hilltops and gullies in the Lesueur area near Jurien where survey by van

Leeuwen has located 72 populations with a total of ca. 19000 plants, over a geographic range of ca. 15 km.

Banksia tricuspis grows as an emergent amongst low or tall shrubland, or itself forming an open woodland.

It grows sometimes in very shallow soil from crevices in sandstone rock, or on deeper soils derived from

laterite or sandstone.  Associated species include 

Hakea neurophylla, Banksia grossa and B. micrantha.  A

single population occurs on flat sandplain country with 



Banksia attenuata,  B. menziesii and Eucalyptus

todtiana.  Survey of this species was carried out in 1980 (Lievense 1981) and research on the reproductive

biology, genetic diversity and conservation status of the species has been undertaken by S. van Leeuwen,

who carried out more extensive survey of the species throughout its range.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora

#

Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  NNE of Mt Peron

Co

Private


28.4.1989

24

Undisturbed, fenced by



property owner

2.  NNE of Mt Peron

Co

Private


2.3.1987

38

Undisturbed



3.  NE of Mt Peron

Co

Private



28.4.1989

169


Some disturbance by

mining, fenced by

property owner

4.  NNE of Mt Peron

Co

Private


10.2.1987

13

Undisturbed



5.  NE of Mt Peron

Co

Private



2.3.1987

21

Undisturbed



6.  NE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park,



Private

24.6.1988

2

Undisturbed



7.  NNE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



17.6.1988

14

Undisturbed



8.  NE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



24.6.1988

79

Undisturbed



                                                     

#

 now Priority 4 (updated at December 1999)



17

9.  NE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



17.7.1988

26

Undisturbed



10.  NE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



16.6.1987

3

Undisturbed



11.  ENE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park,



Private

17.7.1989

304

Some damage to plants



along fenceline

18

Populations Known in the Moora District (Cont'd)

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

12.  ENE of Mt Peron

Co

National Park,



Private

1988-89


-

One plant destroyed

during fencing

13.  ENE of Mt Peron

D

National Park



12.10.1987

1018


Undisturbed, 2 seedlings

present


14.  E of Mt Peron

D

National Park



5.3.1988

47

Burnt in 1985, 5 seedlings



present

15.  E of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



15.3.1988

10

Burnt in 1985



16.  E of Mt Peron

Co

National Park



18.6.1989

45

Burnt in 1985



17.  ESE of Mt Peron

D

National Park



9.8.1988

282


267 plants burnt in 1985

18.  SE of Mt Peron

D

National Park



15.5.1988

361


116 plants burnt in 1985

19.  ESE of Mt Peron

D

National Park



17.6.1988

62

Burnt in 1985



20.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.6.1988

113


83 plants burnt in 1985

21.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



21.6.1988

228


28 plants burnt in 1985

22.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



21.6.1988

8

Burnt in 1985



23.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



21.6.1988

7

Burnt in 1985



24.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



21.6.1988

147


Burnt in 1985

25.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



21.6.1988

247


243 plants burnt in 1985

26.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



26.6.1988

33

Burnt in 1985



27.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

Co

National Park



5.10.1988

24

Burnt in 1985



28.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



31.3.1987

4150


195 plants burnt in 1985

29.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

Co

National Park



5.5.1988

2

Burnt in 1985



30.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

Co

National Park



5.5.1988

3

Burnt in 1985



31.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



11.6.1988

1698


340 plants burnt in 1985

32.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



31.3.1987

24

Undisturbed



33.  S of Mt Peron

D

National Park



10.2.1988

6

Undisturbed



34.  NNW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



9.3.1988

69

Burnt in 1985



35.  NNW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



9.3.1988

220


81 plants burnt in 1985

36.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



9.3.1988

311


255 plants burnt in 1985

37.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



26.10.1987

52

Burnt in 1985



38.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



15.8.1987

2

Undisturbed



39.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



16.8.1987

10

Undisturbed



40.  NE of Mt. Lesueur

D

National Park



5.6.1988

87

Undisturbed



41.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



10.6.1988

2776


130 plants burnt in 1985

42.  NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.6.1988

373


262 plants burnt in 1985

43.  NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



18.4.1988

48

14 plants burnt in 1985



44.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



31.3.1988

255


Burnt in 1985

45.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



26.10.1988

964


770 plants burnt in 1985

46.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



27.10.1988

89

Burnt in 1985



47.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



31.3.1988

6

5 plants burnt in 1985



48.  NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



18.4.1988

183


Undisturbed

49.  NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



1.12.1987

153


Undisturbed

50.  ENE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



25.7.1988

286


Disturbed by mining

exploration

51.  NW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.4.1988

5

4 plants burnt in 1985



52.  NW of Mt Lesueur 

D

National Park



18.4.1988

975


930 plants burnt in 1985

53.  N of Mt Lesueur 

D

National Park



17.5.1988

3

Burnt in 1985



54.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



26.10.1987

13

Burnt in 1985



19

55.  NE of Mt Lesueur

D

Private


18.4.1988

38

Regenerating from



lignotubers after clearing

56.  ENE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.6.1988

8

Undisturbed



Populations Known in the Moora District (Cont'd)

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

57.  ENE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.6.1988

24

Some plants destroyed by



seismic track

58.  ENE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.4.1987

48

Undisturbed



59.  NW of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



15.12.1987

5

Plants scorched in 1985



fire

60.  N of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



21.6.1988

443


Burnt in 1985

61.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.4.1988

17

Burnt in 1985



62.  ENE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



18.4.1988

102


Undisturbed

63.  ENE of Mt Lesueur

Co/D

National Park



11.3.1988

97

Undisturbed



64.  E of Mt Lesueur

Co

National Park



15.5.1988

108


Undisturbed

65.  Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



18.4.1988

1503


1316 plants burnt in 1985

66.  NNE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.3.1988

3

Burnt in 1985



67.  NE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



17.3.1988

88

Burnt in 1985



68.  ENE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



15.5.1988

108


92 plants burnt in 1985

69.  E of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



15.5.1988

125


19 plants burnt in 1985

70.  E of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



15.5.1988

122


118 plants burnt in 1985

71.  E of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



16.5.1988

5

4 plants burnt in 1985



72.  SE of Mt Lesueur

D

National Park



16.5.1988

98

17 plants burnt in 1985



Response to Disturbance

The plant resprouts from the lignotuber and epicormic buds.  Many populations of this species were

completely or partially burnt by a wildfire in autumn 1985.  Observations suggest that seedlings are killed

by fire and do not tolerate burning until at least 20 years of age.  It was found (Lamont and van Leeuwen

1988) that all viable seeds were released in response to an autumn wildfire, and that seedling establishment

only occurred immediately after the fire.  It was also found that most plants in a study population flowered

in the nineteenth year after fire.  Most flower heads were destroyed by moth larvae and larval seeking

cockatoos, with beetle larvae destroying 15% of mature seeds.  Burning is required for follicle rupture.



Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  Monitor populations regularly, particularly any recruitment since the fire in 1985.

-  Exclude off-road vehicle access.

-  Maintain liaison with landowners on whose property some of the populations occur.

-  Fence populations 2, 4-6 and 11.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Protect, where possible, from inappropriate fire regime.

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   ...   44




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə