Western australian wildlife management program no. 28 Declared Rare and Poorly Known Flora in the Moora District



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References

George (1981, 1984b), Holliday and Watton (1975), Lamont and van Leeuwen (1988), Lievense (1981),

Rye and Hopper (1981), Taylor and Hopper (1988), van Leeuwen (1985).


21

Calectasia arnoldii Keighery ms

DASYPOGONACEAE

[

Calectasia sp. Central Wheatbelt (K.Dixon 861)]

Stilted Tinsel Lily

An erect, perennial plant without underground rhizomes and forming clumps to ca. 10 cm in diameter.  The

upright branches or main stems are slender and woody, up to 60 cm long.  There are numerous stilt roots,

some projecting from the upper branches.  The stilt roots are 1-3 mm thick and 1-15 cm long.  The leaves

are narrow, linear and slightly prickly, arranged spirally on the main stems and at the ends of short shoots.

The flowers are similar to those of 

Calectasia cyanea, with six narrow perianth parts, but those of C.

arnoldii ms are of a more intense blue colour.  The six anthers change to red from yellow as they age.

This species is related to 



C. grandiflora, but differs in its erect growth, and in the presence of stilt roots.

Flowering Period:  August-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known in the Moora District from one population south-west of Coorow (population 7).  This species has

been reported to have been found ca. 6 km further north-east along the same road, in a population of the

same size and on the same side of the road (population 2).  This location has been searched several times

without success and is possibly the same population as 7.  Known elsewhere from seven other populations,

five in the Narrogin District and two in the Katanning District.  Of these, three are located on nature

reserves, with a total of 145 plants, two on townsite reserves with 204 plants, one on a shire road reserve, of

one plant, and one on a church site reserve of three plants.

The population near Coorow grows in pale yellow-grey sand in tall open scrub of 

Actinostrobus sp. over

heath with species of 



Verticordia, Eremaea, Leptospermum and Baeckea.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

2.  SW of Coorow

Co

Shire Road Reserve



7.8.1991

20

Healthy, but has not



been found since

7.  Capamauro

Co

Nature Reserve



10.1992

20

Undisturbed



Response to Disturbance

Killed by fire, regenerating from seed.  A population in the Narrogin District which was burnt produced

230 seedlings after the fire, with 123 remaining after two years.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


22

Management Requirements

-  The known population may require marking on the firebreak to prevent damage during maintenance.

-  Monitor population at regular intervals.

-  Protect from inappropriate fire regime where possible.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey is required, particularly within the Nature Reserve where the habitat for this species

appears to be common, and in areas which have been recently burnt.

-  Research is required on the population biology and fire response of the species and its susceptibility to



Phytophthora species.

References

Dixon (1991).



23

Chamelaucium griffinii N.G.Marchant & Keighery ms

MYRTACEAE

[

Chamelaucium sp. Cataby (G.J.Keighery 11009)]

Griffin's Wax Flower

This species was discovered in 1988 by E. Griffin and is known only from one population.  

Chamelaucium

griffinii ms is a much-branched, spreading shrub 30-50 cm tall with terete, obtuse leaves 7-10 mm long,

with a reddish tinge.  The flowers occur in leaf axils at the ends of the branches, on short stalks.  Each

flower has a narrow, 10-ribbed floral tube ca. 4 mm long and five fringed calyx lobes each ca. 1 mm long.

The five petal lobes are broadly elliptic, a little longer than 1 mm, white in colour, ageing to red.  There are

10 stamens alternating with 10 tapering staminodes.  The style is ca. 6 mm long.  This species is related to

C. ciliatum as is C. roycei ms which it resembles but C. griffinii ms differs in the shape of its anthers,

staminodes, petals and in characters of the leaf.

An Interim Recovery Plan has been written for this species by CALM and is currently being implemented.

Flowering Period:  June-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from one population of 30+ plants near Badgingarra which extends from a nature reserve onto

private land.  Despite intensive survey no other populations have been found.  It occurs on the edges of a

breakaway, to the slopes at the base, in brown loam, sandy clay and lateritic gravel between lateritic

boulders.  It grows in low heath, with associated species including 

Melaleuca radula,  Calothamnus

quadrifidus and Dryandra species and under open low woodland of marri.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SE of Cataby

D

Nature Reserve,



Private

25.9.1991

30+

Good, firebreak runs



through population

Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Presumed susceptible



Management Requirements

-  The population should be protected from frequent fire, where possible, until the fire response of the

species is known.


24

-  Continued liaison with landowners and local government authority is essential to ensure the survival of

the population.

-  Monitor the population at regular intervals, particularly in relation to the nearby recently established

lookout, walk trail and carpark.

-  Fence population if visitor pressure becomes deleterious.

-  Investigate the possibility of acquisition of private land on which part of the population occurs, if the

opportunity arises, as an addition to the nature reserve.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Research is required into the fire ecology of the species.

-  Continued survey work is required to discover more populations in the District.

-  Conduct research on the susceptibility of the species to Phytophthora species.



References

Hopper 


et al. (1990), N. Marchant (personal communication).

25

Conostylis micrantha Hopper

HAEMODORACEAE

Small-flowered Conostylis

A perennial herb forming tufts up to 30 cm in diameter.  The leaves are terete, 31-24 cm long, with a few

simple, spreading, white hairs on the lower margins, which are 3-9 mm long.  The flowers are in bifurcate,

flattened heads on stems 5-13 cm long with a hairy, papery bract 3-8 mm long, half way up.  The perianth

is 5-7.5 mm long, tubular in the lower half, dividing into six spreading lobes which are cream inside,

golden yellow towards the base.  The flowers are pale yellowish-cream ageing to brick red.  The stamens

are joined to the perianth at one level, the anthers are 1-1.7 mm long, slightly longer than the filaments.

The style is 3-4 mm long.

This species is related to 

Conostylis teretifolia, but has longer leaf hairs, which are confined to the base of

the leaf.  It flowers earlier and has smaller flowers which are arranged in a bifurcate, flattened, many-

flowered head, not in a few-flowered simple head.

Flowering Period:  July-August

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

This species is endemic to the northern part of the Moora District (extending into the Geraldton District)

where it occurs over a range of ca. 15 km in an area north-east of Dongara.  All but one of the populations

are now in the Geraldton District.



C. micrantha grows in white or grey sand, usually high in the landscape in heath or low heath.  Associated

species include 



Allocasuarina humilis,  Eremaea sp., Hakea trifurcata, Hibbertia hypericoides and

Dryandra fraseri.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  W of Strawberry

I

Railway Reserve



7.8.1992

14

Weed infestation,



disturbance, fire

close to population 



Response to Disturbance

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown


Management Requirements

26

-  Inspect population regularly.

-  Some weed control is required.

-  Maintain liaison with land managers.

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at population.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.

Research Requirements

-  Further survey for new populations, particularly on reserves and uncleared land in the area.

-  Consider establishment on a conservation reserve if no new populations are found.

-  Conduct research on the fire response of the species and its susceptibility to Phytophthora species.



References

Hopper (1987), Hopper 



et al. (1990).

27

Darwinia acerosa W.Fitzg.

MYRTACEAE

Fine-leaved Darwinia

Darwinia acerosa was first collected in the Mogumber area in November 1903 by W.V. Fitzgerald and

named by him the following year.  Further collections were made in 1934 and 1964 from the same area.

Since that time the type population has been destroyed due to a combination of extensive clearing, and

stock grazing of remnant vegetation.



D. acerosa is a densely branched, spreading, heath-like shrub to ca. 40 cm tall, characterised by its whitish

branchlets and crowded, finely pointed, often hooked leaves to 1 cm long and ca. 1 cm wide.  The flower

heads that terminate the short branchlets are drooping, hemispherical, ca. 1.5 cm across, with 40-50 flowers

surrounded by numerous spreading bracts.  The bracts are longer than the flowers but do not hide them.

The petals are yellowish-green.  The styles are hairy below the stigma.

This species resembles 



Darwinia masoni and D. purpurea but is readily separated from both by the above

characteristics.



Flowering Period:  September-October

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Restricted to the Mogumber area, growing in rocky soil on and near granite outcrops.  Known from three

populations in the Moora District and four populations to the south in the Swan Region.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  S of Mogumber

VP

Private


16.8.1993

500+


Healthy

2.  W of New Norcia

VP

Private


27.10.1982

1000+


Healthy

3.  S of Gillingarra

VP

Rail & Shire Reserves



9.7.1991

4

Poor, area



very weedy

Response to Disturbance

-  The plant resprouts from rootstock and stem shoots.

-  Susceptibility to weed invasion is high, the weeds competing with the plants.

-  Grazing impact is also high, one population (now extinct) was destroyed partially due to grazing of the

plants and associated vegetation by stock.

Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be high.



Management Requirements

28

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Continue close liaison with landowners/managers and local authorities.

-  Monitor populations regularly to determine their conservation status.

-  Control invasive weeds.

-  Ensure that stock grazing is excluded from known populations.

-  Protect from frequent fires, where possible, until more information is available on the fire response.

-  Investigate the possibility of land acquisition.

-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Further surveys should be carried out in areas of suitable habitat.

-  Resurvey population 2.

-  Conduct research on the fire response of the species and its susceptibility to Phytophthora species.



References

Fitzgerald (1904), Hopper 



et al. (1990), Rye and Hopper (1981).

29

Darwinia carnea C.A.Gardner

MYRTACEAE

Mogumber Bell

Darwinia carnea was discovered by Charles Gardner, in 1922 in the Babilion Hills near Mogumber.  It was

last seen there in 1970 and was presumed extinct until 1990 when a population was discovered by E.

Griffin not far from the original locality.  Soon after this, a second population was found nearby by J.

Gathe.  A southern form, the Narrogin Bell, is considered to be a separate subspecies of 



D. carnea, and is

known from a single population since its discovery in 1978 on private property near Narrogin.



D. carnea is a small shrub 20-30 cm tall.  The leaves are opposite, linear lanceolate in shape and keeled, 6-

10 mm long.  The flower head is nodding and is surrounded by broad, ovate, coloured bracts which are

yellowish-green to pinkish-red in colour, ca. 3 cm long and which conceal the flowers and their styles.

There are ca. 8 flowers in each head.  Each flower is tubular, with an unribbed calyx tube, and short, blunt

lobes ca. 1.5 mm long.  The five petals are white, 4 mm long.  There are short staminodes between the ten

stamens and the style is 13.5 mm long with a curved, bearded tip.

Plants found in the Babilion Hills area differ from plants in the Narrogin population which are taller, with a

different habit, a larger inflorescence and there is a colour difference in the bracts. 



Flowering Period:  October-December

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from two populations east of Mogumber.  Grows on lateritic gravel and brown loam amongst

massive laterite on breakaways in open low wandoo woodland over heath.  Associated species include

Hibbertia hypericoides, Petrophile heterophylla, Adenanthos cygnorum and Dryandra nobilis.  The species

also occurs in one population in the Narrogin District (population 1) on private property, where there are

now 26 mature plants and 72 seedlings since removal of rabbits from the population.  An attempt was made

in 1985 to re-establish the species on private property in the Moora District in an area where it was thought

to have occurred originally.  None of the transplanted plants survived.  There is also an unconfirmed report

that the species was found WSW of Highbury in the Narrogin District but the location information was not

precise and the population has not been refound.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

3.  SE of Mogumber

VP

Private


30.10.1994

200+ 


Undisturbed, damage to

flower heads possibly by

insects

5.  ESE of Mogumber



VP

Private


30.10.1994

70

Population cleared,



grazed and burnt ca. 5

years ago



Response to Disturbance

30

Unknown


Susceptibility to Phytophthora Dieback

Unknown, but thought to be high.



31

Management Requirements

-  Ensure that dieback hygiene procedures are carried out at all populations.

-  Maintain liaison with property owners.

-  Fence population 5 to prevent further damage from grazing.

-  Monitor populations regularly.

-  Investigate possibility of land acquisition.

-  Protect from frequent fire, where possible, until research has been conducted on the fire response of the

species.


-  Collect seed for storage according to the protocols of the Threatened Flora Seed Centre at the Western

Australian Herbarium.



Research Requirements

-  Investigate cause of damage to flower heads at population 3.

-  Continue electrophoretic research to determine the relationship between the Narrogin and Mogumber

populations.

-  Further survey in suitable habitat on remnant vegetation in the area.

-  Consider establishment in suitable conservation area.

-  Conduct research on the fire response of the species and its susceptibility to Phytophthora species.

References

Blackall and Grieve (1980), Erickson 



et al. (1979), Gardner (1928), Millar (1982), Rye and Hopper (1981).

32

Daviesia bursarioides Crisp

FABACEAE


[

Daviesia sp. Three Springs (M.D.Crisp 6480)]

Three Springs Daviesia

This species was first collected in 1937 from the Irwin District.  Survey by M. Crisp from 1975-1980

resulted in the discovery of only one population.  However in 1993 two others were discovered by C.

Straughan of the Three Springs Shire and a further two populations have been found more recently. 

Daviesia bursarioides is a straggling, divaricately branching shrub to 2 m tall, with blue-green spine-tipped

branches.  The leaves are scattered, small, narrow and obovate in shape, narrowing to the base, to 20 mm x

2.5 mm.  The flowers are grouped in 3-8 flowered racemes in the axils of the leaves, on a long stem to 35

mm, giving the raceme an open appearance.  Each flower has an upper standard petal 7 x 9 mm, yellow in

colour and maroon towards base.  The wing petals are 6 x 3 mm, deep pink, the keel is 5 x 2 mm, maroon

in colour.  The fruit is a triangular pod, to 10 x 9 mm.

This species is distinctive and cannot be confused with other species of 

Daviesia.  The regular, divaricate

branching of the stems, with spiny tips and the small phyllodes give a superficial resemblance to a 



Bursaria

species, hence the specific name.  It is thought to be related to 



Daviesia costata, D. longifolia and

D. pedunculata.

Due to its critically threatened status, an Interim Recovery Plan has been written for this species by CALM

and is currently being implemented.

Flowering Period:  July-September

Distribution and Habitat in the Moora District

Known from five populations over a range of ca. 10 km in the Three Springs area.  Occurs on lateritic

gravel and brown sandy loam on south-west, south and east facing slopes near the crest of hills in remnant

open mallee scrub and heath.  Associated species include 



Allocasuarina campestris, DryandraHakea and

Acacia species.  Four populations occur on very narrow road reserves, with weed infestation in some

populations and cleared or grazed paddocks adjacent.  Population 4 occurs on a disused gravel pit,

extending into uncleared vegetation.

Conservation Status

Current:  Declared Rare Flora



Populations Known in the Moora District

Population

Shire

Land Status



Last Survey

No. of Plants

Condition

1.  SW of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road



Reserve

9.8.1994


19

Road reserve narrow,

plants shaded by other

shrubs


2.  NNE of Three Springs

TS

Shire Road



Reserve

10.8.1994

11

Road reserve narrow



and weed infested

3.  NW of Three Springs

TS

MRWA Road



Reserve

10.8.1994

17

Good, but road reserve



very narrow, adjacent

cleared paddock

4.  W of Three Springs

TS

Private



3.1.1995

60+


Undisturbed

33

5.  NW of Three Springs

TS

MRWA Road



Reserve

24.10.1994

12

Narrow road reserve 



1.* S of Arrino

TS

-



1.7.1993

-

-


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