What's in a Name? Eugenia smithii, then



Yüklə 0,68 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix13.08.2017
ölçüsü0,68 Mb.

What's in a Name? 

Eugenia smithii



then

 

Acmena smithii



now

 

 

 

In 1790, Joseph Banks planted 



one  of  these  lovely  trees  in  the 

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. At that 

time  it  was  recorded  as  Eugenia 

smithii.  Since  then,  much  confusion 

concerning  the  name  has  ensued.  

For  many  years  the  horticultural 

industry  in  Australia  continued  to 

use  the  name  Eugenia  smithii,  then 

more  recently,    Acmena  smithii.  Now  taxonomists  have  reviewed  the 

work  of  German  botanist  Franz  Niedenzu  (1893)  and  decided  that  this 

species  belongs  more  appropriately  in  the  genus  Syzygium.  This 

change  has  been  accepted  by  the  Council  of  Heads  of  Australian 

Herbaria  (CHAH)  and  this  particular  Lilly  Pilly  is  now  recognised  as 



Syzygium smithii.   

 

 



Syzygium  smithii  is  widespread  along  the 

coast  of  Eastern  Australia,  from  King  Island 

(Tasmania),  Victoria,  New  South  Wales  to  far 

north Queensland. The more generally occurring 

form  is  a  tall  tree  with  rounded  leaves  and 

usually creamy  white  berries,  and  is  common  in 

gullies in the Sydney area.  

 

However,  Acmena  smithii 





  Rheophytic 

Race 

 or  Creek  Lilly  Pilly,  which grows  along 



streams  in  rainforest  gullies  north  from  Sydney  to  Queensland,  is  a 

relatively small tree with narrow leaves and brightly coloured edible fruit.  

The name rheophyte comes from Ancient Greek: 

ῥέω

 



 

rhéō –


 to flow 

and 


φυτόν

 



 phutón 

 a plant, thus rheophytes are plants that can grow 



in fast flowing creeks or rivers. This Lilly Pilly also has an abundance of 

common  names,  including  Coast  Satinash,  Eungella  Gum,  Lilly  pilly 



Satinash,  Narrow  Leaved  Lilly  Pilly,  Red  Apple,  Watergum,  Scrub 

Mahogany……..

 

Keep in mind that there are a number of genera and  many, many 

species  of  Lilly  Pilly  in  Australia.  All  belong  in  the  Myrtle  family, 

Myrtaceae,  which  includes  eucalypts,  bottlebrush  and  tea  trees.  Lilly 

Pillies are mostly found in rainforests of Eastern Australia and differ from 

most  of  their  Australian  relatives  from  dry  environments  in  that  they 

usually have large, dark green leaves  with relatively few oil glands and 

have  fleshy  fruits  rather 

than hard, dry fruit.  

 

Syzygium  smithii  will 

attract  parrots,  fruit  eating 

pigeons, 

doves, 


bowerbirds,  flying  foxes 

and  possums  to  your 

garden 

and 


is 

recommended  as  a  fire 

inhibitor  by  various  NSW 

Fire  Authorities  and  local 

councils.  

 

 



Look  for  this  Lilly 

Pilly  fruiting  now  in  the 

Bush  Tucker  Garden  on 

the 


southern 

side 


of 

Building  F7B  near  the 

thermal storage tower.    

 

Information  on  the  Bush  Tucker 



Garden  can  be  found  on  the 

pages 


of 

the 


Macquarie 

University Arboretum web site: 

http://www.mq.edu.au/arboretum

//Gardens/gardens.html

 

or contact Arboretum co-ordinator Samantha Newton at: 



samantha.newton@mq.edu.au

 

 



BPM Hyland, T Whiffin, FA Zich, Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants 

http://keys.trin.org.au/key-server/data/0e0f0504-0103-430d-8004-060d07080d04/media/Html/taxon/Syzygium_smithii.htmFamily

 

Niedenzu, F.J. (1893) Die Naturlichen Pflanzenfamilien 3(7): 85. 



Map modified from Australian Native Plant Society: 

http://anpsa.org.au/a-smi.html



 

 

Alison Downing, Kevin Downing and Brian Atwell 



Department of Biological Sciences 

Monday, 28

th

 July, 2014

 


Yüklə 0,68 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə