Wild Flowers of Western Australia



Yüklə 283,36 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/7
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü283,36 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7

Wild Flowers of Western Australia

 

Naturetrek Tour Report 

2 - 16 September 2005 

 

 



 

 

Naturetrek  Cheriton Mill 



Cheriton 

Alresford 

Hampshire  SO24 0NG 

England 


 

 

T:

 

+44 (0)1962 733051



 

 

F:

 

+44 (0)1962 736426



 

 

 



E:

 

info@naturetrek.co.uk



 

 

 



W:

 

www.naturetrek.co.uk



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Report compiled by Paul Harmes 

 

Hakea victoria - Royal Hakea 

P

a

u



H

a

rm

e

s

 


Tour Report  

Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

 

 



© Naturetrek     December 05 

 

Leaders:  



 

Paul Harmes(tour Leader & Botanist) 

Alan Notley (tour Guide & Botanist) 

Doug Taggart (driver) 

 

Tour participants: 



Rachel Benskin 

Juliet and Peter Dodsworth 

Pat Jones 

Bettye and John Reynolds 

Priscilla and Owen Silver. 

Day 1  

Friday 2nd September 

Weather: Warm and Sunny in London. Hot (34 degrees) in Dubai. 

 

Juliet,  Peter  and  Rachel  met  with  Paul  at  the  boarding  gate  for  Emirates  flight  EK002  Heathrow  to  Dubai, 



departing at 14-00hrs. However, due to industrial action by the in-flight meal providers, the flight was delayed 

for one and three-quarter hours, eventually taking off at 16-15hrs. Following a 7 hour flight we arrived in Dubai, 

where upon we had to make a quick dash across the airport to catch our connecting flight on to Perth. 

Day 2  

Saturday 3rd September 

Weather: Hot in Dubai. Cloudy and hazy sunshire, 18 degrees in Perth. 

 

The Emirates EK420 flight to Perth departed Dubai at 03-15hrs, arriving in Perth at 17-15hrs local time. After 



completing the immigration, customs and quarantine formalities, we met up with Doug Taggart, our Australian 

driver for the duration of the tour. Doug transported us into the city, showing us some of the sites on the way, 

including the Swan River and The Western Australian Cricket Ground, before taking us to The Miss Maudes 

Swedish Hotel, our base for the next two nights. After settling into our rooms, we met up with Pat, Bettye, John 

and Priscilla and Owen, who had all been slowly acclimatizing to the city, and introduced ourselves. From the 

hotel we walked the short distance to Hay Street and the Criterion Hotel Café, where we had a splendid dinner. 



Day 3  

Sunday 4th September 

Weather: Warm and sunny mainly, but some cloud and a little rain in the afternoon. 

 

After an early breakfast we gathered in the hotel lobby, at 08-30hrs, to meet Alan Notley, our local botanical 



guide,  and  Doug  Taggart,  our  driver.  After  introductions,  we  set  off  for  Kings  Park.  This  triumph  of  local 

planning comprises a formal public open space and gardens, over-looking the Swan River and the City. It also 

has an extensive area of natural bushland. Alan began by taking us through the formal planted gardens, and gave 

us an early familiarization with the Western Australian flora and its various regions. Red Wattle-birds, Australian 

Magpies,  Rainbow  Lorikeets  and  a  family  of  Australian  Wood  Duck  were  all  seen.  We  also  found  Caladenia 

latifolia  (Pink  Fairy  Orchid),  and  Microtis  media  ssp.  media  (Common  Mignonette  Orchid).  Moving  into  the 

bushland,  we  took  a  walk,  immediately  finding  Diuris  corymbosa  (Common  Donkey  Orchid),  Sowerbaea  laxiflora 

(Vanilla  Lily)  and  Anigozanthos  manglesii  (Mangle’s  Kangaroo  Paw),  Grevillias,  Banksias,  Myrtles  and  Eucalyptus 


Tour Report  

Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

 

 



2  

© Naturetrek     December 05 

 

species  were  all  seen.  Ring-necked  Parrots  were  also  very  much  in  evidence.  From  here  we  moved  on  to 



Herdsmans Lake. Here we saw Australian Shoveller, Musk Duck, Swamp (Marsh) Harrier and Grey Teal. Along 

the  margins  we  found  Yellow-billed  Spoonbill,  Purple  Swamphen,  Ducky  Moorhen,  Glossy  Ibis  and  a  Little 

Egret. and some obliging Welcome Swallow perched in a Bottlebrush Tree. After a brief stop, at the Grower’s 

Market at Wembley, to buy lunch, we drove out of the city to the Ellis Brook Valley Reserve, an area of semi-

wooded slopes, old quarries and natural bush. Alan led us on a circular walk up to the ridge and down the other 

side. Along the route we saw Brown and New Holland Honeyeaters, Red-eared Firetails, Western Rosella and 

Red-capped Robin. Plants included, Trymalium ledifolium (Water-bush), Hibbertia hypericoides (Yellow Buttercups), 

Isopogon  formosus  (Rose  Coneflower),  Hakea  trifuricata  (Tow-leaved  Hakea),  Drosera  micrantha  (A  Sundew)  and 

Stypandra glauca (Blind Grass). As we neared the car park, a pair of Splendid Fairy-wrens were spotted in some 

Calathamnus bushes. Before leaving this wonderfully rich site, we had a brief stop at an area of open woodland by 

the entrance. Here we found Drosera heterophylla (A Sundew), Patersonia occidentalis (Blue Flag), the parasitic Nuytsia 



floribunda  (Christmas  Tree),  Hakea  lissocarpha  (Honey  Bush)  and  Hypocalymma  angustifolium  (Swan  River  Myrtle). 

Black-faced  Cuckoo-shrike, White-checked  Honeyeaters  and  Silvereyes  were  also seen  and  Weebill  was  heard. 

Reluctantly, we now had to make our way back into the   city and back to our hotel to prepare for moving north 

tomorrow, and for dinner. 



Day 4  

Monday 5th September 

Weather: Cloudy and warm with sunny periods and occasional rain. 

 

After an early breakfast, we loaded our bags into the trailer and boarded our bus for the start of our journey of 



discovery of Western Australia. Leaving the city, we headed north to the outer suburb of Joondalup, where we 

picked up Alan. From here, we headed north and onto the Brand Highway, continuing on past Gingin, making 

our first stop in the Moore River National Park. Along the way, Straw-necked Ibis were spotted from the bus. 

We had a short time botanizing the margin of the reserve, whilst Doug prepared morning tea. Here we found, 



Blancoa canescens (Winter Bell), Calytrix tenuifoliaAganozanthus humilis (Cat’s Paw) and Eucalyptus todtiana – Prickly 

Bark. Moving on we made a short stop for fuel, before continuing to Badgingarra and our main objective for the 

morning,  Hi  Vallee  Farm.  We  made  a  short  stop  on  the  roadside  at  Cataby  to  see  the  splendid  Eucalyptus 

macrocarpa (Mottlecah) in full flower, the largest flowered member of the Eucalyptus Genus. As we approached 

Hi Vallee Farm, on the main road, we saw a Wedge-tailed Eagle being mobbed by two Australian Ravens. Our 

hosts, Joy and Don Williams, greeted us with a welcome picnic lunch, fresh fruit and damper with golden syrup, 

all washed down with ‘billy tea’. The afternoon was spent with Don as our guide, walking in the natural bushland 

on his property. His vast and detailed knowledge was imparted in a clear, passionate and extremely informative 

way.  He  introduced  us  to  some  of  the  fascinating  plant  families,  showed  us  some  rare  and  unusual  local 

specialties  and  opened  our  eyes  to  the  richness  and  diversity  of  this  part  of  Australia.  Eucalyptus,  Dryandra

ConospermumAstroloma and Darwinia species were all present. After thanking our hosts, we bid our farewells to Hi 

Vallee and the group of Western Grey Kangaroos, we had been watching, and made our way to our final stop of 

the day at the Nambung National Park and the Pinnacles Desert. Nankeen Kestrel and Black-shouldered Kite 

were both spotted as we traveled. As we arrived, we had some very close views of an adult male Emu and his 

seven chicks. We were treated to a short, but splendid, sunset, which, set against these fantastic rock formations, 

was rather memorable. As the light began to fade, we drove the short distance to the Jurien Hotel Motel, for the 

night and a well earned dinner. 

 


Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

Tour Report 

 

 



© Naturetrek     December 05 

 

Day 5  



Tuesday 6th September 

Weather: Fine and cloudy with some sunny periods and the odd shower. 

 

Following a splendid breakfast, we departed Jurien, continuing our journey northwards. We stopped briefly at 



Green Head where we saw Crested Terns as well as Scaevola crassifolia (Fanflower), Atriplex isotidia (Coastal Salt 

Bush) and Spiniflex longifolia (Hairy Spiniflex). As we moved north of Leeman, we spotted a flock of Stilts. These 

turned  out  to  be  Black-winged  and  Banded.  A  further  short  roadside  stop  produced  Alyogyne  huegelii  (Lilac 

Hibiscus),  Asphodelus  fistulosus  (Small  Asphodel)  and  Eucalyptus  dongarensis  (Coastal  Dongara  Malle).  During  our 

stop, for morning tea, at Dongara, by the marina, we saw Little Pied Cormorant, Pied Cormorant, and Pacific 

Gull. Among the plants were two grasses, Stenotaphrum secundatum (Buffalo Grass) and Cynodon dactylon (Bermuda 

or  Couch  Grass).  Lunch  was  taken  by  the  sea  in  Geraldton.  However,  before  we  ate,  we  visited  the  HMAS 

Sydney 2nd Memorial to the six-hundred and forty-five souls who perished during this infamous incident. As we 

still had some distance to travel to our destination today, Kalbarri, we soon continued on our way. We made two 

further short stops, one at the Hutt Lagoon ‘Pink Lake’ to see Alyogyne hakeifolia (Hakea-leaved Hibiscus), sadly, 

not flowering, and one a short way from Kalbarri to see a wonderful patch of Leptosema aphylla (Ribbon Pea). 

Our main objective for the afternoon was the Wildflower Centre at Kalbarri. This is an area of natural bushland 

that  has  been  opened  up  and  had  paths  added.  Many  of  the  plants  here  are  labelled  to  assist  identification, 

although none of the plants are obviously planted, accept those in the immediate vicinity of the buildings. Here 

we made some progress with our identification of plant families. After this it was time to check into the Kalbarri 

Beach Resort Motel, and prepare for dinner. 



Day 6  

Wednesday 7th September 

Weather: Cloudy and warm with a strong breeze. 

 

The  most  part  of  today  was  spent  in  the  Kalbarri  National  Park.  The  special  Sandstone  features  and  the 



Murchison River are situated about twenty seven kilometers from the gates of the Park. The sand roads are fairly 

hard going, but gave us opportunities make stops to study the flora. Our first such stop yielded Banksia sceptrum 

(Sceptre  Banksia),  Banksia  victoriae  (Wooly  Orange  Banksia),  neither  of  which  was  in  flower.  We  also  found 

Pimelia  floribunda  (A  Banjine)  and  Geleznowia  verrcosa  and  Grevillea  annulifera  (Prickly  Plume  Grevillea).  A  second 

stop in the bush yielded Darwinia sanguineaGrevillea didymobotrya and Pityrodia atriplicina. The first scheduled stop 

was  at  a  lookout  point,  called  ‘The  Loop’,  where  we  had  good  views  of  the  Murchison River  gorges  and  the 

surrounding  bush.  Here,  we  took  morning  tea  and  then  went  for  a  walk  finding  Grevillea  petrophiloides  (Pink 

Pokers)  and  Darwinia  vestita  (Pom Pom  Darwinia),  Acacia  linophylla  (Bowgada Bush),  Calindrinia  remota  (Round-

leaved  Parakeelya)  and  Keraudrenia  hermanniaefolia  (Crinkle-leaved  Firebush).  During  the  walk  we  visited  a 

viewpoint called ‘Natures Window’. Here took a walk along the ridge between the loops of the river, passing 

some magnificently formed sandstone cliffs and outcrops. After taking some pictures through the ‘Window’, we 

made  our  way  back  to  the  bus  and  moved  to  another  area  known  as  ‘Z  Bends’,  where  we  walked  down  to 

viewing  platform  over  the  Murchison  River.  Plants  recorded  included  Trachymeme  ornata,  Burchardia  rosea  (Pink 

Milkmaids) and Stylidium elongatum (Tall Triggerplant). Retracing our tracks we made our way back to the vehicle 

for lunch. Hunger satisfied, our next port of call was a further short stop in the bush, where we saw  Banksia 



prionotes (Acorn Banksia) and Banksia attenuata (Slender Banksia), before moving to the ‘Hawkshead’ area by the 

river,  for  a  further  two  stops.  The  plants  found  included  Alyxia  buxifolia  (Dysentry  Bush)  and  Calothamus 



Tour Report  

Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

 

 



4  

© Naturetrek     December 05 

 

sanguineus (A One-sided Bottlebrush). Here we began to see some interesting birds. Pied Butcher-bird, Variegated 

Fairy-wren  and  Chestnut-rumped  Thornbill  were  but  three.  Leaving  the  National Park  along  the  road  leading 

back to Kalbarri, we made a stop to look at Veriticordia chrysantha (Feather Flower) and Grevillea leucopteris (Smelly 

Socks). Whilst we were there an Australian Bustard flew overhead. The last part of the day was spent down by 

the Sea at Red Bluff. Sadly we saw no whales, but we did see Australian Gannets fishing, Red-capped Plover, 

Sooty Oystercatchers and Ruddy Turnstones. From here we returned to our hotel for our evening meal. 

Day 7  

Thursday 8th September 

Weather: Rain at times, some sun but mostly cloudy. 

 

Leaving  Kalbarri  early,  we  made  our  way  towards  Northampton.  Just  after  leaving  we  saw  a  Whistling  Kite 



hunting. On the verge where we stopped to watch it, we found Pityrodia oldfieldii (A Foxglove) and Lachnostachys 

eriobotrya (Lambs Wool). About ten kilometers further on, we stopped by a patch of  Grevillea leucopteris (Smelly 

Socks), because it had not been flowering when previously seen. We also found Calectasia grandiflora (Blue Tinsel 

Lily)  and  Orobanche  minor  (Common  Broomrape).  At  Northampton  we  stopped  for  fuel  and  morning  tea. 

During  the  break  we  saw  an  immature  White-bellied  Sea  Eagle.  From  Northampton  we  travelled  east  via 

Nabawa  to  Tenindawa.  Along  the  way  we  stopped  at  a  small  roadside  Nature  Reserve  where  we  saw  Hakea 

bucculenta (Red Pokers) and Ptilotus grandiflora ssp. grandiflora (Annual Mulla Mulla), Caledenia roei (Clown or Ant 

Orhid), and Caledenia longicauda ssp. eminens (Stark White Spider Orchid). Continuing onwards, we saw a flock of 

Little Corella in one field and a small group of Red-tailed Black Cockatoo in another. A brief stop at the glacial 

beds at Bindoo Hill in the Greenough river valley gave us a chance to see the remnants of the glacial morane and 

some different plants and Birds. White Fronted Chat and Australian Pipit were seen by the birders and  Senna 

glutinosa,  Maireana  carnosa  (Cottony  Bluebush)  and  Rhodanthe  chlorocephala  ssp.  splendida,  were  recorded  by  the 

botanists.  We  took  lunch  by  a  railway  siding  just  west  of  Mullewa.  As  we  neared  this  spot,  Doug  spotted  a 

Bobtail Skink crossing the road. Paul caught this lizard and everyone had an opportunity to see its wonderful 

blue, black tongue and to photograph it, before he released it, unharmed and unstressed, away from the road. 

The lunch spot had a few goodies too. These included Anthotroche blackiiBrunonia australis (Native Cornflower) 

and Grevillea obliquistigma. Our main aim today was to visit the site of Lechenaultia macrantha (Wreath Lechenaultia), 

at Pindar. Fortunately, there were a number of these rare and special plants flowering, together with Dampiera 

wellsiana  (Wells’  Dampiera),  Verticordia  grandis  (Scarlet  Featherflower)  and  Balaustion  microphyllum  (Bush 

Pomegranite).  A  little  further  down  the  road  we  stopped  to  find  Darwinia  purpurea  (Rose  Darwinea),  before 

continuing on to the Coalseam Conservation Reserve. Here the ground is covered with a colourful blanket of 

spring annuals and everlastings. Podotheca gnaphaloides (Billy Buttons), Lawrencella davenpoertii (Sticky Everlasting), 



Rhodanthe citrine as well as Eucalyptus loxophleba ssp. loxophleba (York Gum), and Acacia acuminata (Jam Wattle) were 

all present. Notable birds included Peregrine Falcon. It was now time to make our way to Dongara to the Old 

Mill Motel, our accommodation for the night. 

Day 8  

Friday 9th September 

Weather: Fine and sunny with a slight breeze. 

 

Seting off from Dongara, today was to be mostly a travelling day. However, we made a number of stops along 



the way noting the changing vegetation as we moved south. We left the town and joined the southbound Brand 

Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

Tour Report 

 

 



© Naturetrek     December 05 

 

Highway. One sharp eyed member of the group spotted a pacific or White-necked Heron hunting in a roadside 



ditch. Our first stop was on the side of the highway to see Banksia Hookeriana (Hooker’s Banksia) together with 

Jacksonia acicularis and Verticordia grandis (Scarlet Featherflower). Our second such stop yielded  Isotropis cuneifolia 

(Common Lamb Poison or Granny’s Bonnets) and Stackhousia brunonis (Winged Stackhousia). Morning tea was 

taken in the town of Eneabba, where we were joined by Magpie Lark, Magpie and Wattle Birds. Diurus corymbosa 

aff. (Rosy-cheeked Donkey Orchid) and Tersonia cyathiflora (Button Creeper) were also found. As we were leaving 

the town, Doug showed us White-backed Swallows sitting on an overhead Line. We soon made a roadside stop 

to see the Grasstrees Xanthorea priessii and Xanthorea drummondii both flowering after last years burn. Before long we 

turned east and left the Brand Highway behind us, and made our way to Coorow. Along the way we stopped in 

the Alexander Morrison National Park. Heare we found Hakea gilbertiiBoronia ternataPetrophile scabriusculus and 

Commersonia  pulchella,  and  along  the  roadway  a  Wedge-tailed  eagle  was  circling.  We  were  now  entering  an  area 

where  the majestic  Eucalyptus  salmonophloia  (Salmon  Gum)  are  to  be  found.  Lunch  was  taken  in  the bush  near 

Marchagee.  A  Bobtail  Skink  was  disturbed  as  we  arrived,  but  did  not  move  too  far  away  as  we  ate.  Melaleuca 

uncinata (Broom bush), Allocasuina obesa (Sheoak), Hakea brownii and Hakea platyphylla (Cricket Ball Hakea) were all 

present. One short stop near New Norcia produced Trymalium ledifolium and Pterostylis vittana (Banded Greenhood 

Orchid), as well as a Scarlet Robin. Another had Hibbertia miniata and Hakea undulata. We were now fairly close to 

our destination, the El Caballo Resort Hotel at Wooloroo, where we spent the night.  



Day 9  

Saturday 10th September 

Weather: Fresh and bright at first, becoming warmer. 

 

The prospect of the Dryandra Woodlands had us on the road promptly this morning, being seen on our way by a 



pair  of  Laughing  Kookaburra  as  we  left  our  hotel  near  Wooroloo.  Our  route  took  us  south  and  east  though 

York, stopping at Avon Assent for morning tea and some bird watching. The lookout point produced Striated 

Pardalote,  Rufus  Whistler  and  Horsefield’s  Bronze  Cuckoo.  We  travelled  on  through  Pingelly  and  on  to 

Popanyinning, where we took a comfort stop. From here the shortest route into the Dryandra Woodlands was 

along a series of gravel roads, and it wasn’t very long before we found ourselves botanising in this unique habitat. 

Our  first  stop  produced  Lechenaultia  formosa  (Red  Lechenaultia),  Caledenia  saccharata  (Sugar  Orchid),  Cyanicula 



deformis  (Blue  Fairy  Orchid),  Diurus  recurva  (Dainty  Donkey  Orchid)  and  Borya  scirpoides  were  all  found.  Grey 

Currawong were glimpsed by several group members. We took our lunch at the Old Mill Dam, passing stands of 



Eucalyptus astringens (Brown Mallet), the tree for which this area is famous. The bark was used for the Tanin it 

contained, until artificial alternatives were introduced in the 1960s.A short walk after lunch produced good views 

of  Rufous  Treecreeper  together  with  Stackhousia  monogyna,  Mirbilia  floribunda  (Purple  Mirbilia)  and  Cyanicula 

gemmata (Blue China Orchid). As were reached the vehicle Doug spotted a Numbat being chased by a Magpie. 

Several members of the group were able to glimpse this shy and rare marsupial. A short visit to the Congelin 

Dam produced a small group of Pterostylis aff. nana (Hairy-stemmed Snail Orchid), before we made our way to 

an area of Dryandra bush, as we traveled we stopped to photograph the magnificent  Dryandra nobilis (Golden 

Dryandra)  and  Dryandra  polycephala  (Pingle).  The  area  we  stopped  in  had several  plants  we  had  yet  to  become 

acquainted with. These included Isopogon crithmifoliusIsopogon formusus (Rose Coneflower), Hakea ruscifolia (Candle 

Hakea),  Santalum  murrayanum  (Bitter  Quandong)  and  Dryandra  subpinnatifida  var.  subpinnatifida.  Leaving  the 

National Park, we made our way to Narragin and the Albert Facey Motor Inn, our accommodation for the night. 

We arrived in time for a pre-arranged meal at 17-00hrs. This was in order that we could return to the National 

Park to undertake the night Marsupil spotting tour at Bana Mia. It was already dark when we re-entred the Park, 



Yüklə 283,36 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə