Wild Flowers of Western Australia



Yüklə 283,36 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə2/7
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü283,36 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7

Tour Report  

Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

 

 



6  

© Naturetrek     December 05 

 

and  we  soon  had  glimpses  of  Kangaroos  and  a  single  Bilby.  We  were  also  fortunate  enough  to  see  a  Tawny 



Frogmouth glide effortlessly across the road. The tour began with a short talk by our guide, Lin Chadwick. After 

this we followed her outside to visit four feeding stations, where we put out some pellets and fresh food, which 

represents only 10% of the required intake of these charming little animals. Under red touch-light, we saw four 

different small marsupials. These were Bilby, Burrowing Bettong, Boodie and Quenda. This evening was a very 

pleasant experience, and we returned to our hotel charmed by these fascinating creatures. 

Day 10  

Sunday 11th September 

Weather: Chilly and bright, warming up later. 

 

A few early morning risers found Pterostylis sanguinea (Dark-banded Greenhood) and Gastrolobium spinosum in the 



woodland  opposite  our  hotel.  Driving  east  from  Narrogin  we  made  an  early  stop  at  some  roadside  scrubby 

woodland  near  Highbury.  Here  we  saw  Regent  Parrot  as  well  as  Caladenia  falcata  (Forest  Mantis  Orchid), 



Prasophyllum gracile (Little laughing Leek Orchid), Petrophile squamata and Hakea lissocarpa. Our morning tea stop 

was taken at a bush location north of Katanning. A good sized flock of the increasing scarce Regent parrot were 

seen together with Grey fantails. Botanic highlights included Brachysema celsianum (Swan River Pea) and lots more 

Caladenia  falcata  (Forest  Mantis  Orchid).  After  a  comfort  stop  in  Gnowangerup,  we  continued  on  towards 

Borden,  stopping  to  explore  a  particularly  interesting  area  of  bush.  Verticordia  hughanii,  Pterostylis  recurva  (Jug 

Orchid),  Comesprma  volubile  (Love  Creeper)  and  Pterostylis  vittana  (Banded  Greenhood  Orchid  were  all  present). 

Doug found us a roadside layby for lunch, by an area of bush, so a little exploring was soon under way, salad roll 

in  hand!  Calactasia  grandiflora  (Tinsel  Lily),  Caladenia  discoidea  (Bee  Orchid),  Verticordia  chrysantha  (A  Yellow 

Featherflower), Calytrix tetragonia (A White Starflower) and Grevillea fistulosa were all present. However, a shout of 

excitement from Doug revealed the spectacular Thelymitra aff. variegata (Queen of Sheba Orchid) a plant he had 

been searching for fourteen years. We continued our journey, thrilled with the days plant and bird list additions. 

Arriving in Bremer Bay, we saw two Yellow-billed Spoonbills feed in a lake, before making our way down to the 

mouth of the Bremer River where we had a short walk through some dunes and coastal scrub. Templetonia retusa 

(Cockies Tongues), Melaleuca cuticularis (Salt Water Paperbark) and Hakea cygna ssp. cygna were seen. The Birders 

reported Caspian Tern and Silver Gull. Our last port of call was to the lookout point overlooking the bay. Here 

Alan showed us Anthocersis viiscosa (Sticky Tailflower) and Spiridium globulosum. We checked in to the Bremer Bay 

Resort around 17-00hrs, in time to shower before dinner.  



Day 11  

Monday 12th September 

Weather: Rain at first, bright and sunny for most of the day with more rain later. 

 

Our only destination today was the Fitzgerald River Nation Park. As we made our way into the National Park, 



we saw Eucalyptus tetraptra (Four-wiged Mallee) and Eucalyptus tetragona (Tallerack). Firstly we made a call into the 

CALM (Conservation and Land Management) Office to check various species locations with the Ranger, who 

was, unfortunately, out. So, we made our way on into the Park. Our first stop was to see the endemic Pimelia 

physodes  (Qualup  Bell),  Dryandra  trilobus  (Barrel  Coneflower),  Lambertia  inermis  (Chittick),  Adenanthos  cuneatus 

(Coastal Jug Flower and another splendid local endemic, Hakea victoriae (Royal Hakea), the sun highlighting the 

veining  in  the  orange,  green  bracts  wonderfully.  Moving  on  a  short  way  we  stopped  for  the  splendid  Banksia 

coccinea (Scarlet Banksia), and also found some of last years Banksia baxteri (Baxters Banksia) and Banksia baueri 


Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

Tour Report 

 

 



© Naturetrek     December 05 

 

(Wooly or Possum Banksia). Our spot for morning tea, just off the main dirt road, gave us some fantastic views 



of  Wedge-tailed  Eagle  soaring  very  close  by  and  a  good  specimen  of  Hakea  nitida  (Frog  Hakea).  Our  next 

scheduled stop was to be Point Anne. As we approached we paused to check the bay for Whales. It was quickly 

apparent that there were some there, so we got straight back into the bus and drove to the view-point. There 

were at least two female Southern Right Whales with calves in the bay and a couple of single, possibly, young 

adults a little further out to sea. We spent a good half an hour in their company before returning to the bus via 

Banksia  media  (Southern  Plains  Banksia),  Calathamnus  pinifolius  (Dense  clawflower),  Calothamnus  validus  (Barrens 

Clawflower), Melaleuca subrosa (Cork Bark Honeymyrtle) and many more flowers were also recorded. We decided 

to  take  lunch  by  an  adjacent  inlet.  As  we  arrived  we  were  met  by  a  ‘Racehourse’  Goanna  (Gould’s  Monitor 

Lizard). This scavenger and egg thief of the bush was about 600mm long. After lunch we made our way to the 

Qualup Homestead. This is a small sheep farm dating back to the 1850s that is maintained as a small museum, 

but also has a wild flower walk through natural bush, where native, unplanted species are named. Here we found 



Gomphalobium  scabrum  (Painted  Lady),  Conospermum  distichum  (Smokebush),  Synaphea  petiolaris,  Xanthorrhoea 

platyphylla  (Grass  Tree)  and  Calectasia  grandiflora  (Tinsel  Lily).  On  the  return  journey  to  Bremer  Bay,  we  saw 

Alyogyne hueglii (Lilac Hibiscus) growing by the roadside in a gully, ending a wonderful day. 

Day 12  

Tuesday 13th September 

Weather: Wet at first, becoming brighter during the late morning. Rain later. 

 

Before leaving Bremer Bay this morning, we visited two small areas of bush near the hotel, one where Bettye had 



found  Caladenia  cainesiana  (Zebra  Orchid),  and  the  second  to  see  planted  specimens  Regelia  velutina  (Barrens 

Regelia), Eucalyptus tetrapterum (Four-winged Malle) and Caladenia decora (Esperance King Spider Orchid). Driving 

west  we  were  aiming  for  the  Two Peoples  Bay Reserve  to  the  east  of  Albany.  Along  the  way  we saw  White-

fronted  Heron  and  Grey  Butcherbird  before  we  stopped  at  Wellstead  for  morning  tea,  seeing  a  splendid 

specimen  of  Banksia  speciosa  (Showy  Banksia).  A  second  stop  in  a  patch  of  low-laying,  wet  woodland  added 

Caladenia longifimbriata (Green-comb Spider Orchid), Tetratheca hirsuta (Black-eyed Susan), Goodenia affinis and 



Velliea  trinervis.  Turning  off  the  main  south  coast  highway  we  drove  down  to  Two  Peoples  Bay.  This  small 

reserve is the main site for the very rare Noisy Scrub Bird. Unfortunately, the Visitors Centre was closed, so we 

walked  down  to  the  beach  through  Agonis  flexuosa  (Peppermint  Tree),  Lepidosperma  effusum  (Spreading  Sword-

sedge)  and  Anarthria  scabra  (A  Rush)  and  took  lunch  in  a  small  clearing.  After  eating,  we  spent  a  short  time 

exploring the coastal part of the reserve, during which time we saw Australian Pelicans together with Calystachys 

lanceolata  (Native  Willow),  Pterostylis  aff.  nana  (Short-eared  Snail  Orchid)  and  Banksia  littoralis  (Swamp  Banksia). 

Travelling back along the access road towards Albany, we stopped to see Pimelia rosea (Rose Banjine). Beaufortia 



decussaata  (Gravel  Bottlebrush)  and  Xanthosia  rotundifolia  (Southern  Cross).  We  were  soon  arriving  aat  the  Ace 

Motor Inn in Albany, where we would be spending the next two nights. After booking in, there was just enough 

time to visit the City before dinner.  


Tour Report  

Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

 

 



8  

© Naturetrek     December 05 

 

Day 13  



Wednesday 14th September 

Weather: Cloudy at first, becoming bright, warm and sunny. 

 

Our time today was to be spent in the Stirling Range, some eighty kilometers north of Albany. Leaving the City 



we drove north for some sixty kilometers before making a stop to explore some roadside scrub, on the southern 

edge of the National Park. Paracaleana nigrita (Flying Duck Orchid), Isopogon longifolia (Long-leaved Coneflower) 

and Kennedia coccinia (Coral Vine) were all found. A layby just south of the turning to Bluff Knoll, was our spot 

for morning tea, Caladenia reptans ssp. reptans (Little Pink Fairy Orchid), Conostylis setigera (Bristly Cottonheads) and 



Prasophyllum macrostachyum (Laughing Leek Orchid). A single Budgerigar was also glimpsed. From here we moved 

up to the car park at the base of Bluff Knoll, the highest peak in the Stirling Range at 1073m. Here we took a 

walk up the summit track to explore the mountains flora, adding Sphenotoma dracophylloides (Paper Flower), Kingia 

australis (Black Gin) and Andersonia simplex to our ever growing plant list. Alan suggested that we take a drive 

along the Stirling Range Drive, stopping at the Talyuberup picnic stop for lunch. Here we saw Gastrolobium biloba

growing on a stream bank and being serenaded by a Quacking Frog. After lunch we made a number of stops in 

the  bush.  One  of  which  gave  us  the  opportunity  to  walk  up  one  of  the  smaller  hillsides.  Species  recorded 

included  Nemcia  leakiana  (Stirling  Range  Poison),  Isopogon  Baxteri  (Baxter’s  Coneflower),  Hakea  cuculata  (Pink 

Scollops),  Calytrix  leschenaultia  and  Beaufortia  schaueri  (Pink  Bottlebrush),  Beaufortia  heterophylla  (Stirling  Range 

Bottlebrush). Our final stop in this area was made at the White Gum Flats picnic area. This was a wet woodland 

habitat and it produced Caladenia menziesii (Rabbit Orchid) and Cyrtostylis robusta (Mosquito Orchid). There waere 

also 2 Whistling Kites and Square-tailed Kite. The return journey, to Albany, was made via Mount Barker, and 

south down the Albany Highway. The last stop of the day was at the William Gibb reserve on the outskirts of 

Albany. This is a site for the unique Cephatotus follicularis (Albany Pitcher Plant). Unfortunately, owing to the time 

of the year, we only found the first signs of its appearance. There was also Kunzia baxteri (Baxter’s Kunzea) and 

Banksia quecifolius (Oak-leaved Banksia). On our way back to the Motel, Doug took us via the ‘tourist route’ to see 

the sights of the town and harbour. 



Day 14  

Thursday 15th September 

Weather: Showers at first, becoming bright, sunny and warm 

 

Leaving our hotel, we made the comparatively short journey to the Torndirrup National Park, on the coast near 



Albany,  where  we  looked  at  some  locally  famous  geological  features,  including  The  Natural  Bridge.  Black-

browed Albatross, Australian Gannet and Caspian Tern we seen out to sea. Before leaving the Park, we stopped 

to visit  some open scrub heath where we found Banksia ilicifolia (Holly-leaved Banksia) and the young seedlings 

of  Banksia  Grandis  (Bull  Banksia).  We  then  retraced  our  steps  and  turned  west  in  the  direction  of  Denmark, 

where we had morning tea by the river in Berrbridge Park, and Walpole. The ‘Valley of the Giants’ was our main 

objective  today.  Here,  an  ariel-walkway  gives  a  unique  view  of  the  canopy  of  a  good  example  of  ‘Karri’ 

woodland.  Eucalyptus  jacksonii  (Red  Tingle),  Eucalyptus  guilfoylei  (Yellow  Tingle)  and  Eucalyptus  divaricata  (Karri) 

truly dominate this habitat, due to their enormous height. Below, Trymalium floribunda (Karri Hazel), Aloecasaurina 



decussata  (Karri  Sheoak),  Leucopogon  verticillatus  (Tasselflower)  and  Acacia  pentandra  (Karri  Wattle)  are  all  well 

represented.  White-brested  Robin,  New  Holland  Honey-eater  and  Port  Lincoln  Ring-necked  Parrots  were  all 

active. Moving a little further down the road to a picnic site, for lunch, meant we were able to see Red-winged 

fairy-wren at close quarters. After lunch, we moved on, this time in the direction of Manjimup. Along the way, 



Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

Tour Report 

 

 



© Naturetrek     December 05 

 

wet roadside ditches were home to Anigozanthos flavidus (Evergreen Kangeroo Paw). We made a short stop in an 



area of ‘Jarrah’ woodland, a habitat we had, so far, not seen. Here we found Acacia horridusHakea lasianthoides

Boronia gracilipes and Xanthorrhoea gracilis (Graceful Blackboy). Our final destination for the day was Pemberton 

and the famous ‘Gloucester Tree’, an old fire-watch hut erected in the top of a Karri Eucalyptus Tree. Whilst 

none  of  our  number  elected  to  make  the  climb,  we  did  take  time  to  explore  the  woodland.  Western  Rosella, 

‘twenty-eight’ Ring-necked Parrots, White Brested Robin and Western Grey Shrike-thrush we all recorded and 

well as Acacia urophylla (Net-leaved Wattle). From here it was but a short drive into Manjimup, our base for the 

night, the Kingsley Motel. 



Day 15  

Friday 16th September 

Weather: Fine warm and sunny with a breeze. 

 

Our route back to Perth took us northwest from Manjimup along the road to Nannup, through Marri/Jarrah 



woodland. Morning tea was taken in Nannup, close to the Information centre. We were all surprised by a clearly 

definable flood level mark on the wall, given the apparent considerable height the building was above the normal 

water level. Scarlet Robin was spotted busy collecting food. From Nannup, we decided to take a scenic route to 

Balingup. This took us through farming country, along the route of the Blackwood River. Unfortunately, there 

was  no  native  woodland  or  bush  worth  exploring.  Turning  west  at  Balingup,  we  had  a  comfort  stop  at 

Donnybrook,  before  making  our  way  to  Bunbury.  After  a  short  visit  to  the  Boulters  Heights  viewpoint, 

overlooking  the  Indian  Ocean,  we  made  our  way  to  an  area  of  relic  mangrove  swamp,  the  farthest  south  in 

Australia,  where  we  took  lunch  in  a  picnic  area.  Several  alien  species  from  South  Africa  were  prescent  here 

including  Romulea  rosea  ssp.  australis  (Gulidford  Grass),  Sparaxis  pillansii  (Harlequin  Flower),  Cotula  turbinata 

(Fennel Weed) and Trachyandra divaricata (Dune Onion Weed). After eating, we walked out along a broad-walk 

through the Avicennia marina (Mangrove), seeing Darter, Little Black Cormorant, Osprey and Brown Honeyeater. 

Continuing our journey north up the coast towards Perth, we passed though considerable stands of  Eucalyptus 



gomphocephalus  (Tuart).  We  made  a  stop  in  the  Yalgorup  National  Park,  finding  Caladenia  latifolia  (Pink  Fairy 

Orchid), Banksia attenuata (Slender Banksia) and Banksia grandis (Bull Banksia). Just south of Mandurah, at a place 

called  Dawesville,  we  left  the  main  road  and  drove  along  the  side  of  the  Peel  Inlet,  before  rejoining  the 

connecting road to the Kwinana Freeway, which we took into Perth, passing Black Swans, appropriately, on the 

Swan River. After checking into Miss Maud’s Swedish Hotel, it was time to say our fairwells to Doug Taggart, 

our knowledgeable and careful driver, and Alan Notley, our local botanical expert, who had both looked after us 

so well. Our final dinner together was taken in Miss Maud’s restaurant, where we said our goodbyes to Priscilla 

and Owen, who were travelling to Darwin, Karen who was going back south to Denmark and Peter and Juliet, 

who were staying in Perth for a further few days. 

Day 16  

Saturday 17th September 

Weather: Fine Hot and sunny 

 

Today  is  a  free  day  when  everyone  chooses  what  they  want  to  do.  Visits  to  Fremantle  and  the  Kings  Park 



Botanical Gardens, or just shopping. We met back at Miss Maud’s Hotel for the transfer to Perth Airport and 

our flight EK421 to Dubai, departing at 22-30hrs. 

 


Tour Report  

Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

 

 



10  

© Naturetrek     December 05 

 

Day 17  



Sunday 28th September 

Weather: Warm and humid in Dubai. Cloudy and chilly in London. 

Our onward connecting flight, EK001 arrived at London Heathrow at 12-15hr. 


Wild Flowers of Western Australia 

Tour Report 

 

 



© Naturetrek     December 05 

11 

 

Plant list 



Group/Species 

English name(If any) 

Location 

 

 

 

Pteridopsida 

Ferns and their Allies 

 

 



 

 

Adiantaceae 



Maidenhair fern family 

 

Adiantum capillis-veneris 

Maidenhair fern 

Kalbarri, Z Bends 



Cheilanthes sieberi 

Mulga Fern 

Ellis Brook Valley Reserve 

 

 

 



Azollaceae 

Water Fern family 

 

Azolla filiculoides 

Water Fern 



 

 

 

Dennstaedtiaceae 



Bracken Family 

 

Pteridium esculentum 

Bracken 

Two Peoples Bay 



 

 

 



Pinopsida (Gymnosperms) 

Conifers 

 

 

 

 

Casuarinaceae 



 

 

Allocasuarina decussata 

Sheoak 

Valley of the Giants 



Allocasuarina fraseriana 

Sheoak 


Kings Park, Perth 

Allocasuarina humilis 

Sheoak 


Ellis Brook Valley Reserve 

Allocasuarina obesa 

Sheoak 


Marchagee 

 

 

 



Cupressaceae 

Cypress Family 

 

Actinostrobus acuminatus 

Cypress 

Hi Vallee Farm 



Actinostrobus arenarius 

Sandplain Cypress 

Marchagee 

Actinostrobus pyramidalis 

Swan River or Swamp Cypress 

Swamps around Perth 

Callitris canescens 



Callitris glaucophylla 

White Cypress Pine 



Callitris preissii 

Rottnest Island Pine 



 

 

 



Podocarpaceae 

Podocarpus Family 

 

Podocarpus drouynianus 

Kula or Wild Plum 

Jarrah Woodland west of Walpole 



 

 

 



Magnoliidae (Dicotyledons) 

Flowering Plants 

 

 

 

 

Aizoaceae 



Stoneflowers & Pigface Family 

 

Carpobrotus edulis 

Yellow Hottentot Fig 

Fitzgerald River National Park 



Carpobrotus virescens 

Coastal Pigface 

Red Bluff 

Disphyma crassifolium 

Round-leaved Pigface 

Fitzgerald River National Park 

Gunniopsis intermedia 

Sturt’s Pigface 



Mesembryanthemum crystalinum 

Common Ice Plant 

Hutt Lagoon, Port Gregory 

Tetragonia decumbens 

Sea Spinach 

Green Head 

 

 

 



Amaranthaceae 

Pigweed Family 

 

Ptilotus declinatus 

Curved Mulla Mulla 



Ptilotus drummondii var. minor 

Narrow-leaved Mulla Mulla 



Ptilotus exaltus 

Tall Mulla Mulla 



Ptilotus grandiflorus agg 

Nature Reserve, East of Nabawa 



Pyilotus macrocephalus 

Featherheads 

Nature Reserve, East of Nabawa 

Ptilotus obovatus 

Silvertails 



Ptilotus polystachyus 

Longtails 



 

 

 



Apiaceae 

Carrot Family 

 

Eryngium rostrata 



Foeniculum vulgare 



Fennel 

Roadsides near Joondalup 



Xanthosia rotundifolia 

Southern Cross 

Two Peoples Bay Road 

 

 

 



Apocynaceae 

 

 



Alyxia buxifolia 

Dysentry Bush 

Kalbarri, Hawkshead 


Yüklə 283,36 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə