Wind erosion



Yüklə 492,39 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix30.08.2017
ölçüsü492,39 Kb.

  

                

 

 

 



                

  Autumn 2009



Contents:

Overview


Species

Wind erosion 

control

Water use and 



salinity

Biodiversity

A V O N G R O         T.   0 8   9 2 9 1   8 2 4 9         W.   w w w . a v o n g r o . c o m . a u         E .   m d u r c a n @ i i n e t . n e t . a u

W

E

S

T

E

R

N

 

A

U

S

T

R

A

L

I

A

1

Integrated Brushwood plantings for NRM benefits to farming systems



What is brushwood?

Brushwood, also called broombush, is a name given to a group of similar Melaleucas.  Until recently 

these plants were all considered to be one highly variable species, Melaleuca uncinata. By breaking it 

up into separate species, each with clearly defined traits, we can now better match the plants to differ-

ent sites and applications. For example, some of the species have better salt and waterlogging toler-

ance, or a form more amenable to brushwood fencing. By being able to name that species we know 

we are getting those characteristics we want, rather than having to use a lengthy description of the 

features.  A list of the species in the complex is given on page 4.  



What are the benefits of integrated brushwood plantings?

Brushwood plantings can be multi-purpose additions to the farm landscape. They can offer pro-

tection from wind and water erosion, contribute to the mitigation of salinity and waterlogging, 

provide wildlife habitat, as well as being a potential source of farm income.  



Establishment and growth

Observations in Western Australia have shown that growth of 50cm to 60cm in the first 

year  can  be  expected. These  growth  rates  can  be  considered  conservative,  as  they  have 

been achieved at high density (4000 stems per hectare), in gravelly sands with a rainfall of 

290mm. 

Brushwood species grow naturally in a wide range of landscape positions, from hilltops 



to deep mid-slope sands and the saline margins of drainage lines. The plants are hardy 

and versatile, and while they will grow on low nutrient soils, shallow rock, sandy clay 

and deep sands, like any other tree crop their growth and productivity will be enhanced 

with better soils and nutrient levels. Within their natural range, multiple species within 

the complex frequently co-occur. 


Benefits of integrating brushwood into the farm

4

A single row of trees provides little protection from strong winds

Wind erosion strips away nutrients, organic matter, clay and silt and so represents an expensive 

export from the farm. Exposure in crops and pasture induces water stress, and reduces photosynthesis 

and growth.  In animals it causes energy use to be redirected and can lead to lamb or post shearing 

losses.  The situation is resolved by the provision of suitable shelter, in the form of windbreaks, 

shelterbelts and stock havens.  

The best year round treatment for the wind hazard will come from integrated plantings of perennial 

shrubs and trees as windbreaks across the landscape.  Design criteria relating to height, orientation, 

spacing,  porosity  etc.  are  well  documented,  and  this  technical  information,  along  with  species 

selection needs to be applied on a site by site basis. Brushwood species can play a key role here, as 

they are widespread across both the Wheatbelt and local landscapes, and commonly occur on the 

light to medium soils that are especially prone to erosion. Their shrubby form, multiple stems and 

dense foliage makes them ideal windbreaks. 

A network of windbreak plantings can be demonstrated as cost effective in its own right, with the 

land taken out of production being compensated by the increased productivity of the remainder 

of the farmland. Brushwood is also a potentially commercial crop, however if you plan to harvest 

windbreak plantings, give some consideration to management strategies at harvest time, such as 

maintaining stubble or pasture growth, or harvesting alternate hedges of plants to maintain some 

cover.


Farm management and site productivity considerations will determine if block or belt and alley 

plantings are appropriate. For belt plantings, multiple rows can be planted 2m apart, with brushwood 

plants as close as half a metre apart.  The alley spacing should then be adapted to suit the land 

manager’s machinery.



Wind erosion control

2

    Brushwood  plantings  can  consist 



of  strategically  placed  blocks  or 

alleys  to  protect  fragile  soils  and 

integrated with standard agricultural 

practices.   A  well  designed  system 

can  easily  be  incorporated  by  land 

managers using guidance systems.

It  has  also  now  been  found  that 

brushwood  stands  can  be  control 

grazed  and  can  provide  excellent 

shelter for stock. 



Benefits of integrating brushwood into the farm

5

               Water use and salinity control

3

Waterlogging  reduces  plant  growth  and  diminishes  agricultural  productivity.  The  rainfall,  the 



drainage of both the landscape and the soil, and the water storage capacity of the soil determine 

the extent of waterlogging.  Revegetation is a good option for addressing this problem as it deals 

with the excess water in situ, rather than exporting it off site where it may contribute to flooding 

or downstream waterlogging.  Research has shown that it is possible to lower watertables in the 

lower rainfall areas with alley plantings.  Farm plantings located near saline seeps in the Avon 

have been observed to lower water tables and reduce spread of salinity. In dealing with water 

erosion and salinity in the landscape, land managers should consider Melaleucas for harsh sites, 

to increase total water use. In the WA Wheatbelt, some of the brushwood species grow naturally 

on waterlogged and saline areas.

For  upper  and  mid  slope  areas,  the  combination  of  trees  and  surface  water  drainage  provides 

an  optimal  treatment,  as  trees  along  regularly  spaced  banks  achieve  maximum  growth  using 

water accumulated by the banks.  These plantings can be expanded to a wider belt of trees at 

critical areas such as the break of slope and where contour lines cross drainage lines.  The surface 

water drains put crop work and vehicle movement on the contour which reduces fuel usage and 

consequently cropping costs.  This contour planning divides up paddocks into management units 

and the addition of trees to this arrangement causes no further disruption to the working of the 

paddock.  This system also complements other farming aims such as minimising wind and water 

erosion.  

Revegetation can also be targeted to susceptible areas, such as waterways and creeklines where 

there  will  generally  be  minimal  disruption  to  farming  practice  and  often  significant  ancillary 

benefits such as wildlife habitat protection and enhancement, and nutrient stripping.

Commercial prospects for Brushwood

Several potentially commercial products can be realised from brushwood. The most promising of 

these is its use in the manufacture of fencing panels for landscaping.  Some of the species in the 

complex have significant quantities of essential oils in their leaves (Brophy et al).  Like all woody 

plantings on farms, potential exists for the trading of the carbon sequestered by these plants. The 

flowers are considered to be a good source of nectar, and both plantations and native stands are 

popular locations for bee keepers to locate their hives. Most of the species in the complex have the 

capacity to resprout after the aerial stems are harvested. Thought to be an evolutionary response 

to fire, this mechanism means that once established, the plants can be harvested multiple times 

without the need to replant.

3

  Are there biodiversity benefits   

 from planting Brushwood?

The  shrubby  growth  habit,  dense 

foliage,  and  peeling  bark  of 

Melaleuca  stands  can  provide 

habitat  for  many  animals  and 

insects.  Melaleucas  have  a  strong 

scent and attract many insects. Many 

small  birds  have  been  observed  to 

nest  in  these  shrubs.  The  elusive 

underground  orchid,  Rhizanthella 



gardneri has only ever been found 

in  association  with  the  Melaleuca 

complex. 


Brushwood and NRM         

   Autumn 2009



   

   


Acknowledgements

This Avon Catchment Council project is funded with investment from the Australian Government.

Photos courtesy of Helen Job, Tim Emmott and Monica Durcan. 

Text and edits thanks to Wayne O'Sullivan



References:

• Brophy, J.J., Goldsack, R.J., Craven, L.A. and O’Sullivan, W. An investigation of the   

  leaf oils of the Western Australian broombush complex 

  (Melaleuca uncinate sens.lat.) (Myrtaceae). J. Essential Oil Research. 18, 591-599. 

• Craven, L.A., Lepschi BJ., Broadhurst, L., Byrne, M. Taxonomic revision of the   

  broombush complex in Western Australia CSIRO 29/6/2004.

W

E

S

T

E

R

N

 

A

U

S

T

R

A

L

I

A

A V O N G R O         T / F.   0 8   9 2 9 1   8 2 4 9       W.   w w w . a v o n g r o . c o m . a u         E .   m d u r c a n @ i i n e t . n e t . a u

4

The species of the “brushwood complex” -  

Recent field work and taxonomic study of what was known as Melaleuca 



uncinata (Craven, L. et al., 2001) has revealed that there are at least eleven separate species in the “brushwood complex”. 

• Melaleuca uncinata occurs east of a line from near Lake King to Coolgardie in Western Australia, across to Victoria. This spe-

cies is the mainstay of the brushwood fencing industry, and also has high oil foliage. It grows on lower slope, flat, sandy loams.

• Melaleuca atroviridis has two forms. Although taxonomically they are inseparable, ecologically they have traits which are very 

different, and because the species is potentially of commercial significance the distinction is important to state. 

The “sprouter form” grows high in the landscape in the northern central Wheatbelt. It grows on deep, pale yellow acidic sands. 

It has a strong coppice ability, good Brushwood fencing potential and good leaf oil. 

The “seeder form” grows low in the landscape from the north-central Wheatbelt through to the eastern Wheatbelt and Great 

Southern. Grows on slightly acidic loams, clayey sand to sandy clay. Good salt and waterlogging tolerance, strong growth, but 

cannot be relied on to resprout after harvest. This is the tallest growing of all the species and forms.

• Melaleuca hamata is a sprouting species which is wide spread across the wheatbelt including sites which are seasonally wa-

terlogged. Generally grows on mildly acidic, shallow granite soils. Its wide geographic range and variable form means that 

provenance selection will be important if the intent of a planting is for a commercial outcome. 

• Melaleuca osullivanii grows naturally along the Swan coastal plain from Perth to Busselton. It grows on grey sands over clay 

in seasonally waterlogged areas. An important habitat plant but poor form for Brushwood fencing. 

• Melaleuca concreta is a highly variable species occurring from North of Perth to Kalbarri, and as far inland as Wongan Hills 

area. It grows in a range of habitats from waterlogged depressions to deep sand ridges. In the northern part of its range it occurs 

on shallow sandstone. It has a variable but generally poor form. 

• Melaleuca scalena grows naturally with Melaleuca lateriflora and Casurina obesa. It is found from Wyalkatchem to Mount 

Walker, west to Albany Hwy in the Upper Great Southern.  It occurs on grey clayey sand, and shallow duplex soils. It is seldom 

a vigorous or well formed species.

• Melaleuca stereophloia is a tall growing vigorous species found in the northern Wheatbelt, extending into the Gascoyne. It has 

a high cineole oil, coppices well and has good brushwood potential. It occurs on acidic loamy sands and duplex soils.

• Melaleuca zeteticorum is a salt tolerant, spreading species which extends from the central wheatbelt to the goldfields. It occurs 

on the margin of salt lakes and across red sandy loam plains.  Usually low growing with poor form, it has high oil content in the 

leaves.


 • Melaleuca interioris is a spreading shrub of the arid interior, growing from Wiluna east towards central Australia.

 • Melaleuca exuvia is a poor shrub or small tree restricted distribution east of the Wheatbelt. Its salmon coloured peeling papery 

bark give it exceptional potential as an ornamental plant for the arid zone. Grows in sand soils on the margins of salt lakes. 

• Melaleuca vinnula is a small flat leaf shrub from the central to eastern Wheatbelt.  It grows on clayey sands. 



Disclaimer

The details provided in this information sheet 

have been collated from the best available 

information at the time of writing. Please 

check with a reputable revegetation advisor 

prior to making any decisions based on the 

information presented here.


Yüklə 492,39 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə