Defined Contribution Pension Plans: Determinants of Participation and Contributions Rates Gur Huberman &



Yüklə 0.53 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/3
tarix28.11.2016
ölçüsü0.53 Mb.
1   2   3

Assets in Personal Accounts

% of Total House

holds

IXI (population)

Vanguard

Figure 6 Fractions of households at each wealth level

J Finan Serv Res


individual characteristics X

ij

, plan policies Z



j

, and X


j

represents the plan-level averages of

individual characteristics:

U

ij



¼ g

0

þ g



1

X

ij



þ g

2

Z



j

þ g


3

X

j



þ e

ij

; e



ij

¼ h


j

þ e


0

ij

:



ð1Þ

The plan-level averages of individual attributes serve as control variables; A later paragraph

explains how these variables dampen the influence of endogeneity and peer effect on the

coefficient estimation. The disturbance term can be decomposed into a plan-specific

unobserved effect,

η

j



, which is assumed uncorrelated across different plans, and an

individual disturbance, e

0

ij

, assumed independently distributed across individuals. Both



η

j

and e



0

ij

could be heteroskedastic across plans or individuals, but are assumed to be



independent of the regressors. The individual will participate if U

ij

>0, or



PART

ij

¼



1

; if U


ij

> 0;


0

; otherwise:

&

ð2Þ


Determinants of participation can be analyzed using the linear probability model or

maximum likelihood methods such as Probit.

Conditional on participation, the employee

’s desired contribution is described by:

y

Ã

ij



¼ b

0

þ b



1

X

ij



þ b

2

Z



j

þ b


3

X

j



þ d

ij

; d



ij

¼ ϕ


j

þ d


0

ij

:



ð3Þ

The disturbance

δ

ij

can be decomposed in the same way as e



ij

. Due to the max-out

restriction, the observed contribution for a participant is:

y

ij



¼ y

Ã

ij



; if y

Ã

ij



< v

ij

;



v

ij

; otherwise: :



&

ð4Þ


where v

ij

is the maximum allowed contribution. The IRS limit constrains v



ij

to be the lower

of $10,500 and 25% of compensation. If contribution level is expressed as percentage of

compensation,

v

ij

is then the lower of ($10,500/compensation) and 25%. Note that the



model in Eq.

4

allows for individual truncation levels (as $10,500/compensation varies with



compensation levels). Further, some plans may be subject to plan-specific restrictions on

the maximum contribution levels. We discuss the potential effect of such restrictions in

Section

3.3


.

For non-participants, the observed contribution is zero, and their desired contribution

is left unspecified. Note the distinction between corner solution and data censoring: zero

observed contribution is due to corner solution and maxed-out contribution is a result of

data censoring.

Since contributions are between zero and the maximum limit, it is tempting to

analyze them with a two-sided Tobit regression analysis. However, the standard Tobit

estimation is not robust to heteroskedasticity, and unfortunately, diagnostic tests (e.g.,

J Finan Serv Res


Fig.

5

) show that the error terms are highly heteroskedastic which could cause bias in



estimation. The estimation tool used here is the censored median regression which is a

special case of the censored least absolute deviations (CLAD) proposed by Powell (

1984

).

It is based on the following observation: If y



i

is observed uncensored, then its median

would be the regression function x

0

i



b

under the condition that the errors have a zero median.

When y

i

is censored, its median is unaffected by the censoring if the regression function x



0

i

b



is in the uncensored region. However, if x

0

i



b

is on one of the two corners, then more than

50% of the distribution will

“pile up” at the corner in which case the median of y

i

does not


depend on x

0

i



b

. Thus, the computation of the estimator alternates (till convergence) between

deleting observations with x

0

i



bb that are outside the uncensored region, and estimating the

regression coefficients by applying the median regression to the remaining observations.

For this reason, coefficients are not identified for observations with conditional median

contribution (given the individual and plan characteristics) outside the non-censored region

[0, 10,500]. For the present sample, roughly speaking, the method does not offer sharp

predictions on behavior for people who earn below $20,000 or above $150,000 (about 10%

of the sample). Analysis of this sub-sample is deferred to Section

4

.



In Eq.

3

, individual characteristics (X



ij

) include: (1) Annual compensation in $10,000 or

in logarithm (COMP); (2) The wealth rank (IXI rank from 1 to 24) of the nine-digit zip

neighborhood where the individual lives or the log of average household wealth in that IXI

bracket (WEALTH). Strictly speaking, the WEALTH variable measures the average financial

wealth of the neighborhood the employee lives in, which could be a noisy indicator of total

personal wealth. On the positive side, this measure is also less susceptible to the

endogeneity of personal wealth to savings propensity. This WEALTH variable has great

explanatory power for participation/contribution, especially participation, but leaving it out

of the regressions does not affect other coefficients (except compensation) significantly; (3)

A gender dummy (FEMALE); (4) Age in years in excess of 18 (AGE); (5) The length (in

years) of the individual

’s tenure with the current employer (TENURE).

Plan policy variables include the presence of company stocks as an investment

option (COMPSTK), the presence of DB plans (DB), and number of funds offered to

employees (NFUNDS). Variables for the intensity of employer match very slightly

differently in specifications depending on the context. A binary variable, MATCH, is equal

to one if the employer offers any match. The match rate which appears in the analysis of

participation probability is the average match rate for the first 2% of salary, denoted

MATCH_INI. The match rate used in the contribution analysis is the average match rate for

the first 5% of salary, denoted MATCH_AVG. About 39% of the employees in the sample

face tiered match schedules. The separate measures of match intend to capture the different

nature of the strength of the incentive for participation and contribution decisions. In the

decision on whether to make any positive contribution (participation), the relevant incentive

is the match rate for the first dollar contributed. In our sample, this corresponds to match

rate for the first 2% of compensation. For the contribution decision, the relevant incentive is

the match for the total range, and most plans in our sample match up to 5% of employees.

Finally, plan-level control variables include: (1) average compensation (COMP_

MEAN); (2) average age (AGE_MEAN); (3) average tenure (TENURE_MEAN); (4)

average wealth (WEALTH_MEAN); (5) log number of employees (NEMPLOYEE), (6) the

rate of web registration among participants within the plan in percentage points (WEB). In

the absence of information about employee education, WEB proxies for the average

education level, the sophistication level of the plan participants, or some other firm

attribute that is correlated with Internet penetration. COMP_MEAN and WEALTH_MEAN

are in the same units as COMP and WEALTH in the same regression. To a large extent,

J Finan Serv Res



these variables can be viewed as exogenous, i.e., out of the control of plan policy makers.

Adding these variables in the regressions serves two purposes in addition to the role of

conventional control variables. First, they serve as instruments for possible endogeneity of

plan policies in response to characteristics and behavior of people within the plan. For

example, Mitchell et al. (

2005


) show that there is a strong tax motivation in employers

matching programs subject to the federal non-discrimination rules. As a result, plan-

offered match schedules are affected by the average compensation of employees (or those

separately of the highly compensated and non-highly compensated employees). If the

common component in behavior of employees belonging to the same plan is due to

aggregate individual characteristics such as average income, the part of plan-level policies

that is orthogonal to plan-level aggregate individual characteristics can be considered as

exogenous (see, e.g., Chamberlain,

1985

). Second, they serve as instruments to control for



potential peer effect, that is, the influence of colleagues participation and contribution

choices on an individuals own choices. (Manski

1993

, offers detailed analysis of peer



effects; Duflo and Saez (

2003


) examine peer effects in retirement savings decisions.)

3 Participation and Contribution: Full-sample Analyses

3.1 Individual Participation

Table


1

reports participation regressions (Eq.

2

using both the linear probability (Columns 1



and 2) and the probit models (Columns 3 and 4). In linear probability models, COMP and

WEALTH are expressed in log dollars because they are both highly right-skewed variables,

and Fig.

3

suggests a concave relationship between participation and compensation.



MATCH_INI is the average match rate (in percentage points) for up to 2% of salary. (This is

the match rate relevant to the participation, as opposed to the contribution decision.)

Reported standard errors adjust for heteroskedasticity (both within and across groups, and

group-specific disturbances) as well as within group correlation (due to the group-specific

disturbance

δ

j



). A comparison of the two columns indicates that the marginal effect of

individual attributes is not much affected by the plan policies. Bear in mind that when

standard errors are adjusted for plan random effect (

η

j



) in Eq.

1

, the



“effective” sample size

for coefficients estimates of individual variables is of the order of the total sample size

(about 700,000) while that for coefficients estimates of plan variables is of the order of the

number of plans, or just 647. (Wooldridge

2003

, offers a general analysis on the



asymptotics of cluster samples, especially where number of observations within clusters is

large relative to the number of clusters.)

In Probit estimation, COMP and WEALTH are both in dollar terms and in logarithms

(the plan-level average COMP and WEALTH carry the same units in the same regression.)

The marginal probabilities reported (setting all non-dummy variables at their mean values,

and all dummy variables at zero) are comparable to the coefficients from linear probability

models. Measures of goodness-of-fit are pseudo R-squared and incremental probability of

correct prediction. The former is defined as the likelihood ratio 1

À Ln L

ð Þ=Ln L


0

ð Þ, where

L

0

is the log-likelihood value with the constant term only. The latter is defined as



b

Pr

by



i

>

1



2

y

i



> 0

j

À



Á

þ b


Pr

by

i



<

1

2



y

i

< 0

j

À

Á



À 1, where b

Pr is the empirical frequency, and

by

i

is



the predicted probability from the estimation. The null value of this probability is zero, and

a value of one indicates perfect prediction. The analysis has close to 800,000 observations,

and just a handful explanatory variables. Viewed in this context, the explanatory power of

J Finan Serv Res



T

able


1

D

eterminants



of

individua

l

participation.



Depe

ndent


variable

is

P



A

R

T



.

The


all-sample

par


ticipation

rate


is

70.8%.


All

coef


ficients

are


multiplie

d

b



y

100.


COMP

and


WEAL

TH

are



expres

sed


in

log


dolla

rs

in



Column

s

(1)



–(3)

.

In



colu

mn

(4),



COM

P

is



exp

ressed


in

$10,000,


and

WEAL


TH

is

exp



ressed

in

IXI



ranks

from


1

to

24.



Column

s

(1)



and

(2)


are

res


ults

from


the

linea


r

prob


ability

mode


l.

The


t-

statistics

adjust

for


both

heteroskedasticity

(both

within


and

across


grou

ps,


and

group-s


pecific

disturbances)

and

within


grou

p

correlation



(due

to

the



group-s

pecific


distur

bance).


Co

lumn


s

(3)


and

(4)


report

results


from

prob


it

estim


ation

.

The



stan

dard


err

ors


are

adju


sted

for


cor

relation


within

the


sam

e

plan.



Pseudo

R-squa


red

is

reporte



d

for


good

ness-of


-fit.

Th

e



mar

ginal


probab

ilities


are

ca

lculated



b

y

settin



g

all


non-

dummy


variables

at

their



mea

n

valu



es,

and


all

dummy


vari

ables


at

zero.


The

sample


contains

793,


794

eligible


emp

loyees


in

647


plan

s.

Th



e

ef

fective



sam

ple


size

on

indiv



idua

l

(pla



n)

variables

is

the


numb

er

o



f

empl


oyees

(pla


ns)

Linear


probab

ility


Pr

obit


(1)

(2)


(3)

(4)


COEF

SE

COEF



SE

COEF


SE

Mar


gl.

Pr

.



COEF

SE

Mar



gl.

Pr

.



I

CNST


214.


14

36.8


8

196.



39

40.05


926.76


81.03



173.

06

86.2



1

COM



P

15.27


0.21

15.2


1

0.23


57.3

4

4.72



18.1

2

1



1.54

0.94


3.71

WEAL


TH

5.96


0.06

5.93


0.07

23.1


6

1.30


7.32

2.14


0.34

0.69


FEM

ALE


5.64

0.50


4.66

0.84


18.8

8

1.29



5.97

20.1


1

0.93


6.47

AG

E



0.21

0.05


0.22

0.08


0.32

0.44


0.10

0.88


0.51

0.28


AG

E^2


0.00

0.00


0.00

0.00


0.01


0.01

0.00


0.01


0.01

0.00


TENUR

E

1.30



0.08

1.17


0.14

4.79


0.47

1.51


5.07

0.55


1.63

TENUR


E^2

0.03



0.00

0.03



0.00

0.12



0.01

0.04



0.12


0.02

0.04



II

MA

TCH_I



NI

0.12


0.02

––

0.44



0.04

0.14


0.41

0.04


0.13

COM


PSTK

3.50


1.60

––

9.47



4.40

3.01


7.53

3.58


2.41

DB



0.28

1.45


––

1.01


2.1

1

0.32



0.26

2.60


0.09

NFUND


S

0.23



0.1

1

––



0.92


0.31

0.25



0.78


0.34

0.25



III

COM


P_MEA

N

3.30



4.50

3.46


5.39

7.36


6.12

2.32


2.77

0.94


0.89

WEAL


TH_

MEAN


1.70


2.62

1.12



3.13

5.38



4.58

1.70



5.31


2.56

1.71



AG

E_MEAN


1.49

0.32


0.99

0.59


4.53

1.50


1.43

5.27


2.02

1.70


TENUR

E_MEAN


1.09


0.29

0.77



0.38

3.78



0.70

1.19



4.17


0.92

1.34



WEB

0.07


0.08

0.18


0.09

0.31


0.14

0.10


0.65

0.14


0.21

NEMP


LOY

EE



2.89

0.52


3.37


0.77

9.55



2.10

3.02



9.80


2.02

3.15



Pseudo

R-square


d

0.19


0.18

0.18


0.13

J Finan Serv Res



the reduced form linear model is remarkable: R

2

is about 19% and incremental probability



of correct prediction is about 30%.

Income and wealth are the most important determinants for participation in DC plans.

Other things equal and on average, a $10,000 increase in annual compensation is associated

with about 3.7% higher probability of participation (unless otherwise stated, reported

numbers are the marginal probability estimates from the Probit model in column (4) of

Table


1

). Females are 6.5% more likely to participate than their male counterparts. The

stock phrase

“other things equal” is particularly pertinent here. Women’s overall

participation rate is 70.0%, less than the 71.3% participation rate of men. However,

women typically earn less than men

—their median wage is $39,500, whereas men’s’

median wage is $54,000 in this sample

—and they have shorter tenure—a median tenure of

9.5 years compared with men

’s 10.5 years in this sample. The 6.5% gender difference in

participation rates applies after controlling for these and the other variables.

Older and longer tenured employees are more likely to participate. For an average 18-

year old who just starts on her job, each year of advance in age (tenure) is associated with

an increased 0.2% (1.6%) participation probability, and both marginal effects are decreasing

in years. The tax-deferred nature of 401(k) contributions suggests that controlling for

income (and the marginal tax rate that goes with it) it is more beneficial to contribute early

in one


’s career. However, earlier in one’s career is when liquidity constraints are likely to

reduce the propensity to save for retirement. Moreover, the salience of retirement (and the

need to save for it) may increase with age. Finally, the pattern documented here may arise

because employees who join 401(k) plans are very unlikely to leave them. Analysis of a

long panel of records can determine the validity of this hypothesis.

With the exception of DB, the plan-level policy variables seem to affect individual

participation. Table

1

suggests that participation rate could be about 13% higher in a plan



that offers 100% match than in an otherwise equal plan that offers no match. Using

MATCH_AVG, the sensitivity estimate is about 1 percentage point lower. Further (results

not tabulated), the mere existence of a match (regardless of the magnitude) increases

participation by 6.3%, and each 1% rise in match rate further increases participation by

0.08%.

When company stock is an investable option, the participation probability increases by



2.4%. One caveat regarding company stock: By and large, firms where company stock is an

investable fund are publicly held. It may well be that

“company stock” proxies here for

“publicly held firm.” Unfortunately, the records available for this study (plan identities are

removed) do not allow a further investigation of the issue.

The big surprise is the coefficient on DB, which is small in magnitude and statistically

indistinguishable from zero. Controlling for individual and other plan level attributes, it

seems that participation rates of those covered and not covered by a DB plan are similar.

Moreover, the same result (not tabulated) emerges when the analysis is repeated for the

subsample of employees who are at least 40 years old with at least 10 years of tenure. It is

those over 40 who are more likely to be conscientious about the status of their retirement

savings, and, among them, those with at least 10 years of tenure to have accumulated

considerable rights to retirement benefits if their employer offers a DB plan. Their

participation rates are similar to comparable employees not covered by a DB plan. Even

and Macpherson (

2003


) report similar findings based on Current Population Survey of

1993. The similarity in behavior suggests that, counter-intuitively, the presence of a DB

plan does not affect the participation decision in a 401(k) plan, or that employees who have

stronger taste for savings are more likely to work for companies that offer multiple

retirement savings vehicles.

J Finan Serv Res



Controlling for other variables is crucial to this result and its interpretation because a

comparison of the raw data leads to the opposite conclusion. Participation rates for the full

sample are 68 and 76%, for employees working for firms that offer or do not offer DB

plans, respectively. When attention is confined to the subsample of those over 40 and with

at least 10 years of tenure, the corresponding participation rates are 71 and 86%,

respectively. However, employers with DB plans tend to be larger employers and the

average compensation and wealth levels of those employed by firms that offer DB plans are

lower (the correlations between DB and plan size, plan average compensation, plan average

wealth are 0.44,

−0.12, −0.20, respectively). Excluding those plan-average variables would

produce a negative and significant coefficient on DB equal

−3.0%; further excluding

WEALTH from the explanatory variables would yield a coefficient of −3.6%. Therefore, the

present result does not contradict Cunningham and Engelhardt (

2002

). However, DB has no



effect on participation only after controlling for these and the other variables in the analysis.

Unfortunately, hazard model-type analysis (used, e.g., in Choi et al.

2002

) accommo-



dating changing behavior over time is not feasible here because the data underlying this

study consist of a single cross-section. If plan policies change over time and the

participation of employees is sensitive to these policies as they evolve, the estimates

reported here could be subject to measurement errors. This observation is especially

pertinent to MATCH which could vary from year to year. The behavior of the 63,043

employees hired in 2001 serves as sensitivity check because their decision to participate

was based only the plan policies prevailing in 2001.

Using the same specification as the first column in Table

1

on the new hires subsample,



the participation probability is 11% higher for employees who were offered 100% match

compared to those without match (significant at less than the 1% level). Still, about 19% of

the employees who are offered employer match of at least 50% choose not to participate,

and among those who participate, 45% do not contribute up to the match threshold. Such

evidence is echoed in Choi et al. (

2005


) (these authors further estimate that the foregoing

matching contributions average 1.3% of the annual pay of the under-contributing

employees). Further, the participation probability is 2.2% higher when the company stock

is an investable option, and is 2.8% lower when a DB plan is also present, but neither of

the effects is statistically significant at less than 10% level after adjusting for the plan

random effects.

Interpreting results from this subsample, however, requires some caution. First, some

non-participants, especially those who were hired for less than a couple of months, may be

simply taking time in making their decisions rather than choosing not to participate. (The

subsample participation rate is 45%, as opposed to the all sample participation rate of 71%).

Second, the new hires sample is skewed toward the young, inexperienced, and low-income

subpopulation of the 401(k) eligible employees, the inference from which may not extend

to the general population. Finally, restricting the sample to people who were hired during

one particular year may reflect a shock that is particular to that year.

3.2 Individual Contributions

This subsection employs censored median regressions to estimate the relations between

individual contribution and individual characteristics as well as plan policies.

Table


2

reports the estimates of three censored median regressions with different

dependent variables: contribution in dollar amount; and saving rate in percentage (i.e., the

ratio of contribution to compensation). The censoring in the median regressions is designed

to account for zero being the lower bound on savings and the lower of $10,500 and 25% of

J Finan Serv Res



employee compensation being the upper bound. Robustness checks further assess the

impact of additional plan-imposed constraints on contributions made by highly compen-

sated employees.

The dollar amount specification suggests that other things equal, contributions

increase by $909 for an increase of $10,000 in compensation, and that women

contribute $482 more than men. The sensitivities to individual attributes were also

estimated separately for each of the 483 plans that had more than 100 employee

records. The average estimates from all plans (which assign equal weights on plans

regardless of their size) on compensation and gender are $916 and $478, almost

identical to the two coefficients from pooled regressions.

Age seems to be negatively associated with contributions for younger employees (below

40) but positively associated with contributions for older employees.

A match increases contributions: an increase in the match from zero to 100% will

increase contributions by $457. Further, among companies that offer company stock as an

investment option, the effect of 100% match is stronger by $159 when the match is

restricted to company stock. (Results not tabulated.) The presence of company stock among

the investable funds does not seem to have a consistent impact on contribution. It is slightly

negative (but not distinguishable from zero) in the first specification (Column (1) where

both contribution and compensation are expressed in dollars), but is positive and significant

in the savings rate specification (Columns (2)). The estimation from the latter specification

assigns more weight to the low-income employees. The next section shows that they are

more responsive to the presence of company stock, which explains the difference in

outcome between the first specification and second and third specification.

The presence of a DB plan increases employee contributions by $180. Again, it is

important to interpret this observation in the context of controlling for other variables. In

the raw data, the median contribution of employees working for firms that have DB plans

is $504 lower than their no-DB counterparts; and among employees who are 40 years or

older and have at least ten years of tenure, the difference of medians is $1,580. (Unlike

average contribution, plan median contribution is not affected by non-participants and

maxed-out contributions.) This property in the raw data is consistent with findings of

negative relation between the presence of DB plans and contribution rates summarized in

Clark and Schieber (

1998

).

The controls reverse the inference offered by the raw differences because firms that have



DB plans tend to have more employees who have longer tenure, but less financial wealth. It

is possible that these controls also capture some employees

’ propensity to save. Such

individuals may tend to work for larger companies (that presumably offer safer

employment) in which employees stay longer with their employers. The results are even

more surprising to the extent that the control variables capture a taste for savings.

Papke (

2004a


) uses survey data and OLS regressions in which she controls for income,

wealth, gender and marital status. She reports that DB coverage is associated with higher

contributions to DC plans, but the effect is statistically insignificant. The results reported

here are far more reliable because the underlying data are of higher quality and the analysis

itself exploits the higher data quality by controlling for plan-level characteristics and

allowing for censoring in the contributions. Nonetheless, it is worth remembering that the

DB measure reported here (as well as in other studies) is a crude indicator of coverage

rather than the more desired measure of the employee

’s cumulative rights within the plan.

Still, to the extent that this measure is correlated with the employees

’ non-DC benefits upon

retirement, the results are valid and the positive correlation between the presence of DB

future benefits and current DC contributions is surprising indeed.

J Finan Serv Res



T

able


2

Determinants

of

indiv


idua

l

con



tribution:

censored


med

ian


regression

analysis.

The

depend


ent

variables

are:

contribu


tion

in

dolla



rs

(Columns


(1)

,

(3)



and

(5)),


and

savi


ngs

rate


(equals

con


tribu

tion/comp

ensation

,

Column



s

(2)


and

(4)).


Ce

nsored


med

ian


reg

ression


(P

owell


(

1984


))

is

applied



to

all


spec

ifications.

Co

lumns


(1)

to

(4)



use

the


full

sam


ple.

Co

lumn



(5)

exc


ludes

all


highl

y-comp


ensated

emp


loyees

(HC


Es,

who


ea

rned


$85,

000


or

more).


Column

s

(1)



and

(2)


incorpo

rate


con

tribution

cens

oring


due

to

the



IRS

limit


(the

lower


of

$10,500


or

25%


of

compen


sation).

Column


s

(3)


and

(4)


fur

ther


inco

rporate


potential

plan


-specific

limits


w

here


an

observati

on

is

treated



upper

-censo


red

if

(1)



the

employe


e

contribu


tes

to

the



IR

S

limit;



or

(2)


the

employe


e

is

in



a

“pote


ntially

limited


plan

and



has

clos


e

to

the



max

imum


cont

ribution


deferral

rate


in

the


plan

(within


0.25

%).


A

“pote


ntially

limited


plan

is



def

ined


as

a

plan



that

(1)


nobo

dy

in



the

plan


has

total


contribu

tion


up

to

25%



of

com


pensatio

n;

(2)



at

least


five

emp


loyees

in

the



plan

(who


con

tribute


less

than


$10,500)

hav


e

con


tribut

ion


deferral

rates


clus

ter


at

the


plan

maximum


(within

0.5%).


Pseudo

R-squa


red

is

the



prop

ortion


of

the


sum

of

abso



lute

dev


iations

in

the



dependent

variable


explained

by

the



regression

IRS


limit

only


Plan-specific

limit


adj.

HCE-


exclude

d

(1)



Linear

(2)


Sa

ving


rate

(3)


Linear

(4)


Saving

rate


(5)

COEF


SE

COEF


*100

SE*1


00

COEF


SE

CEOF*10


0

Se*100


COEF

SE

I



CNS

T



3,95

8.64


590.

84



591.06

161.


61

3,88



9.52

580.


97

573.25



168.

40



3,737.80

648.99


COM

P

909.



99

1

1.57



88.6

6

5.47



91

1.78


1

1.36


175.38

14.6


0

912.86


32.3

2

WEAL



TH

81.2


2

4.81


16.3

8

1.27



81.6

8

4.82



9.72

0.87


73.5

7

6.69



FEM

ALE


481.

05

24.8



4

100.16


7.18

485.


70

24.6


5

100.34


7.35

435.51


38.9

9

AG



E

33.3



7

8.09


4.88


2.74

33.6



3

7.95


2.48


2.91

26.2



9

10.1


2

AG

E^2



1.1

1

0.16



0.21

0.05


1.12

0.16


0.14

0.05


0.96

0.21


TENUR

E

78.8



3

7.15


18.4

0

1.49



79.4

0

7.00



13.3

9

1.43



71.5

6

7.20



TENUR

E^2


2.07


0.24

0.46



0.05

2.08



0.24

0.34



0.04

1.90



0.24

II

MA



TCH_A

VG

4.60



0.76

1.32


0.20

4.64


0.76

0.95


0.16

4.66


0.83

COM


PSTK

12.9



7

54.9


5

20.7


4

16.4


4

16.6



1

54.6


1

18.4


2

15.9


1

0.43



60.5

5

DB



177.

89

55.9



1

25.1


3

12.7


7

182.


06

56.1


2

7.65


1

1.24


170.01

63.8


7

NFUN


DS

5.45



3.74

2.15



0.93

5.74



3.74

0.96



0.77

2.45



4.34

III


COM

P_ME


AN

14.0


0

15.3


8

8.67


3.57

13.9


6

15.2


5

2.92


2.07

5.31


16.6

0

WEAL



TH_

MEAN


103.


58

30.6


8

29.5



2

9.18


105.


25

30.1


1

15.3



1

8.07


99.2


4

35.8


6

AG

E_MEAN



57.4

7

14.9



6

19.1


3

2.94


56.3

0

14.9



2

1

1.95



3.38

54.2


6

14.9


6

TENUR


E_MEA

N



67.4

5

17.9



3

17.2



0

3.37


67.0


9

17.8


5

1



1.49

3.39


64.5


4

19.3


0

WEB


19.0

2

3.25



3.74

0.67


19.3

2

3.27



2.13

0.63


17.1

0

3.75



NEM

PLOYEE


1

15.1



5

20.4


1

37.7



2

6.35


1

18.6



6

20.2


9

27.9



7

5.75


1

16.1



8

28.3


0

No.


indiv

iduals


&

plan


s

793,


794

647


793,

794


647

793,794


647

793,


794

647


661,

104


643

Pseudo


R-squa

red


0.25

0.10


0.25

0.1


1

0.19


J Finan Serv Res

The savings rate specification (Column (2)) is quite consistent with the other

specification, showing that an increase in compensation form $40,000

–$50,000 is

associated with an almost 1% increase in the saving rate. Women

’s saving rates are

1.05% higher than those of men. Savings rate increase by 0.18% when company stock

is an investable fund and by 0.25% when a DB plan covers the employee.

3.3 Plan-specific Limits on Contribution

Some 401(k) plan sponsors might impose maximum contribution limits on their

employees that are lower than the IRS limit ($10,500 or 25% of compensation). There

are two types of such lower limits: uniform plan limits on contribution (usually the total

contribution from both employee and employer) as a percentage of employee

compensation; and contribution limits for highly compensated employees (HCEs,

defined as those who earned $85,000 or higher in 2001) in compliance with the

federal non-discrimination rules. This section analyzes both situations.

First, the plan-specific limits for all employees in a plan. Some of the 401(k) plans

in the sample have been historically organized as profit-sharing plans. As such, they

were subject to the 15% limit on total employer and employee contributions as a

percentage of employee compensation. Other sponsors might have raised the limit to

17

–18% or sometimes higher in order to encourage employee contribution. Unfortu-



nately, no explicit information is available. Mitchell et al. (

2005


) discuss the possible

prevalence of these limits in this sample.

We adopt the following algorithm to classify plans that are suspicious of having

limits lower than that of the IRS: a plan is classified as a

“potentially limited plan”

with a limit of c%<25% if: (1) Nobody in the plan has total contribution deferral rate

greater than c%; and (2) there are five people or more in the plan whose total contribution

is more than (c%

–0.5%), but lower than $10,500.

2

The second criterion ensures that there is



some clustering at c% so that the observed upper bound is not a random incidence.

Altogether there are 341 plans (out of 647) that satisfy both criteria above. About 54.5% of

our sample eligible employees, and 84.3% of our sample participants are potentially subject

to plan-specific limits, and 3.3% of participants are potentially constrained by such limits

(that is, they contribute an amount that is lower than $10,500 but is at the putative plan-

specific limits).

Plan-specific limits require modification of Eq.

4

in estimation. An employee



’s

contribution is upper-censored if any of the following holds: (1) He contributes $10,500

(we allow $25 for the rounding error); (2) he contributes 25% of his compensation (we

allow 0.25% for the rounding error); and (3) he is in one of the

“potentially limited plans”

described above, and has the highest deferral rate in his plan (we allow 0.25% for the

rounding error). If an employee

’s contribution is upper-censored for any of the three

reasons, we record it as y

ij

¼ v



ij

(for observed contribution) and y

Ã

ij

v



ij

(for desired

contribution) in the censored regression.

Columns (3) and (4) of Table

2

report the results from the extended censored regression



estimation. It should be noted that this specification might over-classify upper-censored

2

The 0.5% is to allow for rounding error. We err on over-classifying



“potentially limited plans” to be on the

conservative side.

J Finan Serv Res


observations because the

“potentially limited plans” may not actually have any mandatory

limits.

3

Fortunately results are qualitatively similar to those in (1) and (2) except that in the



savings rate specification the marginal effect of compensation is much strengthened

(because highly-compensated employees are more likely to be constrained). The similarity

arises because only a small portion of the employees are actually constrained although a

great majority of them are subject to potential plan-specific limits: about 2.4% of the

eligible employees and 3.3% of the participants invest up to the potential plan limits that are

lower than the IRS limit.

Second, plan-specific limits for HCEs. Encouraging savings of low- and middle-

income American families has been an important mission for policy makers (see recent

papers by Bernartzi and Thaler

2004


; Duflo et al.

2006


). Some plans face additional limits

on contributions made by HCEs under the federal non-discrimination rule with the stated

goal that the DC plans do not overly disproportionately benefit the high-income people

(see, e.g., Holden and VanDerhei

2001

; Mitchell et al.



2005

). The data set unfortunately

does not provide information on such plan-specific restrictions on HCEs. As a sensitivity

check, column (5) of Table

2

reports the regression estimates of the main specification (as



in column (1)) on the subsample of employees who earned less than $85,000 (about 83% of

the sample). Results seem to be consistent with those of the full sample.

3.4 Maximum Contribution

As a by-product of individual contribution analysis, the decision to max out is also

considered. Table

3

reports estimates of maxing out using the same model specifications as



in the last two columns of Table

1

. The first two columns classify maximum contribution



according to the IRS limit, while column (3) also includes potentially upper-censored

observations due to plan-specific limits. The maxing-out rates among participants is 12.2%

in the first two columns, and 15.5% in the third. All individual characteristics affect the

probability of maxing out in the same direction as they do the probability of participation.

Not surprisingly, the marginal probability of incremental compensation on maxing-out is

higher when potential plan limits are taken into account (semi-elasticity of compensation, in

logarithm, on maxing-out increases from 12.7 to 21.2 percentage points). Females are even

more likely to max-out than males in the plan-limit adjusted specification: the gender

difference increases from 1.4 to 3.2 percentage points (because the more savings-prone

gender is more likely to be constrained by plan limits).

The match rate seems to have a negative impact on maxing-out, but the effect goes away

once plan specific limits are adjusted for. This difference is explainable by plan specific

limits most of which are imposed on total contribution including employer match: for

employees who intend to contribute close to the maximum allowable amount by the plans,

employer match becomes substitutes for their own contribution. This effect is exacerbated

by the positive correlation between the existence of potential plan limits and plan match

3

It could be that all employees in a plan voluntarily contribute less than certain percentage of their income,



and a handful of them (five or more) contribute very close at the top (c%). This is more likely to be the case

when c% is higher, such as those greater than 15%. For example, it is plausible that nobody contributes more

than 20% of their compensation, even in the absence of any plan-specific limit. For people with

compensation greater than $52,500, the $10,500 IRS limit binds first. For people from the lower

compensation group, contributing 20% or more would imply low take-home pay. On the other hand, one can

also argue that the classification method may miss-out limited plans, too. Under-classification is quite

innocuous for the estimation purpose. Non-detectable plan limits imply that they are basically non-binding

(except for maybe less than five people in a plan). A plan-specific limit only affects contribution when it is

binding, that is, when the employees are constrained.

J Finan Serv Res



T

able


3

Determinants

of

indiv


idua

l

maxing



out.

Depe


ndent

variable


is

MAXO


UT

,

and



the

estimation

method

is

prob



it.

The


max

ing-out


rate

amo


ng

participants

is

12.2


%

ac

cording



to

the


IR

S

limit



(Columns

(1)


and

(2)


),

and


15.5%

takin


g

into


account

of

maximum



contribu

tion


in

“pote


ntially

limited


plans

(C



olumn

(3)).


The

definition

o

f

“potentially



limited

plan


s”

is

the



sam

e

as



in

T

able



2

.

A



ll

coef


ficients

are


multiplied

by

100.



COM

P

and



WEAL

TH

are



expres

sed


in

log


dolla

rs

in



colu

mns


(1)

and


(3);

and


COM

P

is



expres

sed


in

$10,000,


and

WEAL


TH

is

exp



ressed

in

IXI



ranks

from


1

to

2



4

in

colu



mn

(2)


.

Standard


errors

are


adju

sted


for

within


plan

cor


relation.

Pse


ud

o

R-squa



red

is

rep



orted

for


goodnes

s-of-fit.

Th

e

mar



ginal

probab


ilities

are


calcula

ted


by

settin


g

all


non-dum

my

var



iables

at

their



mean

valu


es,

and


all

dumm


y

vari


ables

at

zero.



Only

par


ticipants

are


included

in

estim



ation.

The


sam

ple


contains

562,


013

par


ticipants

in

647



plan

s.

The



ef

fective


sam

ple


size

on

indiv



idua

l

(pla



n)

vari


ables

is

the



numb

er

of



emp

loyees


(pla

ns)


IR

S

limit



only

Pla


n-spec

ific


limit

adj.


(1)

Log-Com


p

(2)


D

ollar


-C

OMP


(3)

Log-Com


p

COEF


SE

Mar


gl.

Pr

.



COEF

SE

Mar



gl.

Pr

.



COEF

SE

Mar



gl.

Pr

.



I

CNST


2,879.19


55.03



653.

18

53.3



2



1,42

1.90


48.9

2



COMP

207.


73

2.41


12.7

3

19.23



0.26

2.09


1

18.69


2.29

21.1


9

WEAL


TH

6.84


0.49

0.42


2.20

0.16


0.24

9.53


0.66

1.70


FEMA

LE

22.7



9

1.24


1.40

13.17


1.41

1.43


18.16

2.23


3.24

AGE


0.87


0.36

0.05



0.62

0.41


0.07

0.71



0.54

0.13



AGE^2

0.04


0.01

0.00


0.01

0.01


0.00

0.04


0.01

0.01


TENURE

0.57


0.23

0.03


0.55

0.28


0.06

1.09


0.35

0.19


TENURE^

2



0.02

0.01


0.00

0.01



0.01

0.00


0.03


0.01

0.01



II

MA

TCH_A



VG

0.27



0.04

0.02



0.19


0.04

0.02



0.10


0.07

0.02



COMPST

K



17.4

0

3.81



1.10


13.88


3.67

1.54



7.89


4.52

1.42



DB

9.37



1.85

0.59



6.44


2.06

0.71



2.40


4.64

0.43



NFUNDS

0.55


0.15

0.03


0.70

0.20


0.08

0.31



0.33

0.05



III

COMP_


MEAN

1



1.10

4.95


0.68


1.16


0.58

0.13



0.80


0.82

0.14



WEAL

TH_MEA


N

17.5


1

3.14


1.07

8.66


1.45

0.94


1.17


4.35

0.21



AGE_MEA

N

4.79



0.84

0.29


4.35

0.88


0.47

2.33



1.08

0.42



TENURE_M

EAN


2.29


0.32

0.14



2.35


0.37

0.25



0.57

0.83


0.10

WEB


0.99

0.10


0.06

1.28


0.10

0.14


0.69

0.21


0.12

NEMP


LOYEE

9.48


1.45

0.58


8.63

1.44


0.94

1.59



1.33

0.28



Pseudo

R-squa


red

0.41


0.22

0.38


J Finan Serv Res

rate (the coefficient of correlation is 0.18). Presence of company stock and DB plans do not

seem to have consistent effects on participants

’ tendency to max out once plan limits are

accounted for.

4 Participation and Contribution: The Impact of Variation in Compensation

The evidence so far shows that compensation is a major determinant of participation and

contribution. There are a few differences between low- and high-income employees that can

lead to this result. One, the tax benefits of saving through a tax-deferred vehicle are more

generous to the high-income employees. Two, low-income employees are more likely to

face liquidity constraints that will prevent them from putting money away, even in a tax-

deferred plan. Three, Social Security benefits offer high salary replacement rates to low-

income employees, and render alternative retirement savings less urgent. Four, low-income

employees may be less educated and sophisticated about the benefits and costs of

participating in a 401(k) plan. Engen and Gale (

2000

) suggest that the savings behavior



varies across earnings groups, and therefore 401(k) plans have different effects on

household wealth.

The differences between low- and high-income employees suggest a re-examination of

the data separately for various levels of compensation, a luxury easily afforded by almost

800,000 records on hand. This section reports estimates of the probit analysis of the

participation and estimates of two sets of Tobit regressions, done at different compensation

levels. One is a two-sided Tobit, aimed at estimating a censored linear contribution model

for all employees at a given compensation level. Another is a one-sided Tobit aimed at

estimating a censored linear contribution model only for participants. The three estimated

models produce three sets of slope coefficients. Juxtaposing these coefficients provides a

more comprehensive understanding of the employees

’ decisions.

Technically, estimating the models again for various compensation levels modifies

specifications (1)

–(2) and (3)–(4) above, by allowing the slope coefficients (i.e., sensitivity

of participation and contribution to those factors) to depend on the compensation. Such a

modification is reasonable in the absence of a rigid structural model, and enhances the

exploration of the rich data set at hand.

The following equation summarizes the relations among the three sets of coefficients

(corresponding to probit, one-sided Tobit and two-sided Tobit estimates). Let y

Ã

ij

be the



desired contribution (could be a latent variable) by individual i in plan j, and W

ij

be a



personal or plan characteristic variable. Then:

@E y


Ã

ij

W



ij



h



i

@W

ij



¼ Pr PART

ij

¼ 1



Â

à@E y


Ã

ij

W



ij

; PART


ij

¼ 1




h

i



@W

ij

þ E y



Ã

ij

W



ij

; PART


ij

¼ 1




h

i @ Pr PART



ij

¼ 1


Â

Ã

@W



ij

ð5Þ


In the equation, when the independent variable W is binary (e.g., gender or availability

of a DB plan), a partial derivative represents a difference (i.e., the change in the dependent

variable when the binary variable changes from zero to one.) The left hand side of the

equation,

@E y

Ã

ij



W

ij

j



½

Š

@W



ij

, is the sensitivity of the desired contribution per employee to a change in a

variable W (e.g., compensation, match intensity, gender, etc.) at a given level of

compensation. On the right hand side, Pr[PART

ij

=1] is the probability of participation



J Finan Serv Res

given all attributes, and

@E y


Ã

ij

W



ij

;PART


ij

¼1

j



½

Š

@W



ij

is the sensitivity of the desired contribution by an

employee conditional on participation;

E y


Ã

ij

W



ij

; PART


ij

¼ 1




Â

Ã



is the expected contribution

amount conditioned on participation, and finally,

@ Pr PART

ij

¼1



½

Š

@W



ij

is the marginal change in

participation probability to an incremental change in W.

If the models are correctly specified, then the two-sided Tobit coefficients are consistent

estimates of

@E y


Ã

ij

W



ij

j

½



Š

@W

ij



; the one-sided Tobit coefficients are consistent estimates of

@E y


Ã

ij

W



ij

;PART


ij

¼1

j



½

Š

@W



ij

, and the marginal probabilities from probit estimation are consistent

proxies for

@ Pr PART

ij

¼1

½



Š

@W

ij



. Equation

5

implies that the unconditional response to a unit change



of an independent variable (two-sided Tobit) is larger (resp., smaller) than the same

response conditional on participation (one-sided Tobit) if the variable is positively (resp.,

negatively) associated with participation probability (Probit regression).

Figures


7

,

8



,

9

,



10

and


11

summarize the estimates of the three regressions for each

compensation bin. They are similarly structured with three graphs each. Each graph

corresponds to the estimates of one of the three sets of regressions. The horizontal axis,

common to the three graphs, indicates the compensation bin. The right vertical axis is the

scale of the marginal probability, and the left vertical axis is the scale of the marginal

contribution, both for participants and for the whole population in the corresponding

compensation bin. All figures depict smoothed coefficients, i.e., weighted averages of

actual regression coefficients of the central bin regression (50% weight) and its two

neighboring bin regressions (25% each). The dotted lines represent 95% confidence

intervals.

The regressions underlying Figs.

7

,

8



,

9

,



10

and


11

are estimated independently. For

each, the records used are of the employees (or participants, for the one-sided Tobit) whose

compensation ranges from $5,000 ($10,000) below the central point of the subsample to

$5,000 ($10,000) above it, if the central point of the subsample corresponds to

compensation below (above) $100,000. Thus, for instance, the slope coefficients

(sensitivities) of the regression labeled $50,000, are estimates using the records of those

earning between $45,000 and $55,000.

When considering the evidence sorted by compensation, it is helpful to remember that

half the employees in the sample earn less than $47,000. On the other hand, those who earn

more than $73,500

—23% of the sample—contribute half the money in the sample.

Therefore, the findings regarding lower income employees should inspire policies that

0

200



400

600


800

1000


1200

1400


15 20

25 30 35 40

45 50 55 60

65 70 75 80

85 90 95 100 110 120 130 140 150

1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə