Defined Contribution Pension Plans: Determinants of Participation and Contributions Rates Gur Huberman &



Yüklə 0.53 Mb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix28.11.2016
ölçüsü0.53 Mb.
  1   2   3

Defined Contribution Pension Plans: Determinants

of Participation and Contributions Rates

Gur Huberman

&

Sheena S. Iyengar



&

Wei Jiang

Received: 21 October 2005 / Revised: 22 August 2006 / Accepted: 05 January 2007

# Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2007

Abstract Records of 793,794 employees eligible to participate in 647 defined contribution

pension plans are studied. About 71% of them choose to participate in the plans, and of the

participants, 12% choose to contribute the maximum allowed, $10,500. The main findings

are (other things equal) (1) participation rates, contributions and (most remarkably) savings

rates increase with compensation; on average, a $10,000 increase in compensation is

associated with a 3.7% higher participation probability and $900 higher contribution; (2)

women

’s participation probability is 6.5% higher than men’s and they contribute almost $500



more than men; (3) participation probabilities are similar for employees covered and not

covered by DB plans, but those covered by DB plans contribute more to the DC plans; (4) the

availability of a match by the employer increases employees

’ participation and contributions;

the effect is strongest for low-income employees; (v) participation rates, especially among

low-income employees, are higher when company stock is an investable fund.

Keywords 401(k) plans . defined contribution

1 Introduction

Defined contribution pension plans in general, and 401(k) plans in particular are important

vehicles for retirement savings. Although a handful of studies have considered individual

and plan-level attributes that affect participation in such plans, or, for participants, levels of

contribution, these studies either used only survey data (Papke

2004a

; Munnell et al.



2001

;

J Finan Serv Res



DOI 10.1007/s10693-007-0003-6

G. Huberman

:

W. Jiang (



*)

Finance and Economics Division, Columbia Business School, 3022 Broadway,

New York, NY 10027, USA

e-mail: wj2006@columbia.edu

G. Huberman

e-mail: gh16@columbia.edu

S. S. Iyengar

Management Division, Columbia Business School, New York, NY, USA

e-mail: ss957@columbia.edu


Even and Macpherson

2003


), or employee records for very few firms (Kusko et al.

1998


;

Clark and Schieber

1998

; Agnew et al.



2003

) or used plan-level data (Papke

2004b

; Papke


and Poterba

1995


). With information on almost 800,000 employees eligible to participate in

647 such plans (include those who chose not to participate), this study provides a

comprehensive picture of the variables associated with individual participation in and

contribution to 401(k) plans.

Individual-level data are important because in general, it is inappropriate to estimate a

relation on an aggregate level and then infer that an analogous relation holds at the

individual level. In some cases, even the sign of certain sensitivity estimates could be

reversed (See a discussion in Freedman

2001

). Records of non-participants afford



particularly powerful analysis of the participation and contribution decisions.

Some


—but not all—of the qualitative relations reported here are straightforward in light

of the incentives faced by employees. For instance, the presence of an employer match

should increase employees

’ participation in a 401(k) plan. The data afford going beyond

qualitative observations. Specifically, they allow precise estimation of the sensitivities of

employee behavior to explanatory variables which are important in their own right, and

very useful to designers of retirement savings plans and policy makers at the firm and

national levels.

This study goes beyond estimating overall relations between choice variables

participation and level of contribution



—and individual and plan attributes. It explores

why and how sensitivities of the choice variables to the attributes differ between the

participation and contribution decision, and it also considers how the sensitivities of the

choice variables to the attributes vary with compensation. The main results can thus be

summarized while enumerating the main attributes, both of the plans and individuals.

Although individual characteristics such as gender and age are clearly exogenous, one

cannot rule out the possibility that plan design could be catering for the aggregate

characteristics and preferences of plan employees (see Mitchell et al.

2006

, for an analysis



of plan design), or that individual employees self-select into employers who offer plans that

suit their retirement savings needs. Without reasonably long panel data it is difficult to tease

out such effects using identification based on changes (such as the fixed effects method).

All individual-level analyses in the paper control for plan aggregate characteristics (such as

plan-average compensation, etc.) to mitigate the endogeneity concern at the individual

level. It is possible, however, that some of the effects of plan policies documented here

might capture cross-sectional relation rather than a definite causal relation due to

unobserved plan-level heterogeneity. In interpreting these results, we also discuss the

plausibility of alternative hypothesis.

Plan designs have strong effects on savings outcome (see a recent review by Choi et al.

(

2004c


)). Among plan-level attributes, the first important one is coverage in a defined

benefit (DB) plan. Comparing two similar individuals, the one with a DB plan is already

saving for retirement, and his propensity to forego current consumption and liquidity in

favor of consumption during retirement should be lower. On the other hand, an extreme

form of mental accounting will render rights within a DB plan completely irrelevant to

choices in a DC plan. Employees covered by a DB plan who have this form of mental

accounting will participate in and contribute to their DC plans as if they were not covered

by a DB plan. (Shefrin and Thaler

1992

, and Thaler



1999

, describe and analyze instances of

mental accounting.) Moreover, the need to save for retirement may be more salient among

those covered by a DB plan, or the savings-prone individuals are more likely attracted to

employers that offer both DB and DC plans. The combined effect will lead to the surprising

result that those covered by DB plans make stronger usage of 401(k) plans. The data are

J Finan Serv Res


consistent with this last, and very counterintuitive result: other things equal, participation

rates of those covered and not covered by DB plans are similar; contributions of those

covered by DB plans are higher.

Many employers

–539 plans in the study’s sample of 647 plans–offer to match

employees

’ contributions to DC plans. These matches are powerful incentives to

participate, and indeed, participation rates are higher in the presence of a match. The

incentive effect of the match is strongest for the lowest-income employees, and it decreases

with compensation. In fact, at low-income levels (annual compensation between $10,000

and $20,000), a 100% employer match could increase participation probability by nearly

20%; at higher incomes (above $90,000), the incentive effect drops to about 5%.

The data indicate that the presence of a match increases contributions, primarily by

increasing participation. In fact, among participants, the presence of a match seems to have

no effect on contributions of low-income employees and, surprisingly, negative effect on

contributions of those earning between $40,000 and $130,000. Participants

’ tendency to

contribute at the upper limit on employer

’s match may be responsible for this counterintuitive

finding. (Employers typically limit their matches to 5

–6% of a participant’s salary.)

The strong effect of matching programs on participation, especially of low-income

employees, offers an immediate suggestion for a policy that encourages retirement savings

in self-directed savings plans such as IRAs: the government could match the savers

contributions. Such a matching program can be more intense for low-income individuals if



wealth redistribution is a secondary goal.

The inclusion of company stock in the plan

’s menu of investable funds guarantees the

presence of a familiar option in the menu. Huberman (

2001

) argues that familiarity breeds



investment. In fact, one of his examples is company stock in 401(k) plans. Other studies

that consider the impact of company stock on asset allocation in 401(k) plans include Benartzi

(

2001


), Choi et al. (

2004a


,

b

,



c

), Huberman and Sengmuller (

2004

), Liang and Weisbenner



(

2002


), Mitchell and Utkus (

2003


), Meulbroek (

2002


), Ramaswamy (

2002


), Holden and

VanDerhei (

2003

), and Poterba (



2003

). One theme common to these studies is that being

associated with bad portfolio selection, the presence of company stock in the investable

funds is bad for participants.

Overlooked thus far has been the potential salutary effect of including company stock in

the investable funds: participation probability may be higher, presumably because eligible

employees feel more comfortable participating when a familiar option is available.

Empirically, this is the case. Participation probabilities are higher, especially for low-

income employees. For employees who earn less than $35,000, the presence of company

stocks as an investment option increase participation by more than 5%. The effect

diminishes for employees who earn more than $40,000.

Compensation and gender are the more interesting individual attributes. The progres-

sivity of the income tax code entails stronger incentives to participate and contribute to

those who earn more. Moreover, low-income employees are more likely to have, or

anticipate having liquidity constraints which will deter them from participating or

contributing large sums to a 401(k) plan, where the money is locked up until retirement.

Additionally, low-income employees expect higher salary replacement rates from social

security upon retirement than high-income employees. This anticipation lowers the desire to

save for retirement.

The data indeed show that controlling for all other variables, participation probability

typically increases by almost 4% and contributions increase by about $900 for an increase

of $10,000 in compensation. Moreover, savings rates

—the ratios of contributions to

compensation

—increase with compensation.

J Finan Serv Res



Gender matters in saving decisions, adding to prior findings of gender differences in

financial decisions (see, e.g., Barber and Odean

2001

, and Bajtelsmit and Bernasek



1999

).

Holding other variables the same (especially compensation!) women



’s participation

probabilities are 6.5% higher and their contributions are close to $500 higher.

This gender difference has at least two explanations, which are not mutually exclusive.

One, that women have a stronger preference for saving, perhaps because they typically live

longer than men. Two, the unit of decision is the household, and in many cases women are

secondary wage earners whose incomes supplement those of their husbands. In these cases

the women

’s recorded incomes are substantially lower than their households’ incomes and

their behavior is likely to reflect their households

’ incomes. (Nationally, according to

Business Week, in 70% of the married households the husbands earn more than the wives.)

The next section describes the data and the econometric model. Section

3

reports the



overall evidence and Section

4

reports how estimates vary with compensation. Section



5

discusses the findings.

2 Data Description and Model Set-up

2.1 Data


The Vanguard Group provided 926,104 participation and contribution employee records

(including employees who were eligible but chose to not participate) in defined contribution

(DC) pension, mostly 401(k) plans for the year 2001. The data contain 647 plans in 69

industries (by SIC two-digit codes). All plans required eligible employees to opt into the plan.

Other concurrent studies using the same dataset including Iyengar et al. (

2004


, on the effect

of offered choices on 401(k) participation), Mitchell et al. (

2005

and


2006

, on the effect of

plan design on plan-level savings behavior; 2006, on the determinants of 401(k) plan

design), Huberman and Jiang (

2006

, on the relation between offerings and choices for



individual 401(k) participants), and Iyengar and Kamenica (2006, on choice overload and

401(k) asset allocation).

For the purpose of this research, excluded from the data were observations in at least one

of the following categories: (1) The employee was hired after January 1, 2001 (9.6% of the

observations). This exclusion criterion ensures that the person is employed for the whole

year of 2001; (2) The person is less than 18 years old (0.02% of the observations). (3) The

annual compensation is less than $10,000 or above $1 million (7.51% of the observations)

to avoid the influence of extreme outliers. 793,794 observations survive. The

Appendix

offers more details on the construction of variables.

The all-sample participation rate is 71%, and about 76% of the eligible employees have

positive balances (comparable to the national average participation rate of 76% reported by

the Profit Sharing/401(k) Council of America

2001


,

2002


). The average individual pre-tax

contribution rate for the whole sample and that for the highly compensated employees

(defined as those who earned $85,000 or more in 2001) were 4.7 and 6.3%, respectively,

compared to the national averages of 5.2 and 6.3% (Council of America

2001

,

2002



). In

summary, the savings behavior of employees in the Vanguard sample seems representative

of the overall population of eligible employees.

In the sample, 63% are male, and the mean age is 43. Figures

1

and


2

plot the sample

’s

age and compensation histograms, respectively. Compensation mean and median are



$61,150 and $47,430, respectively. In comparison, the same figures from the Survey of

Consumer Finance (SCF) are $70,700 and $43,200. The average compensation is $65,900

J Finan Serv Res


for the 1998 SCF 401(k) eligible employee sample. In 2001, the maximum compensation

for defined contribution plan purpose was $170,000, and therefore the compensation

variable used in the regressions is winsorized at $170,000 (about 3% of the sample). Other

information about individual characteristics includes tenure and financial wealth of the

nine-digit zip neighborhood the employee lives in. A company called IXI collects retail and

IRA asset data from most of the large financial services companies. IXI receives the data

from all the companies at the nine-digit zip level, and then divides the total financial assets

by the number of households in the relevant nine-digit zip area to determine the average

0

20

40



60

80

100



120

140


160

180


18-22

23-27


28-32

33-37


38-42

43-47


48-52

53-57


58-62

63-67


68-72

73-


Number (in 1,000s)

Employees

Participants

Figure 1 Age distribution of eligible employees and participants

0

20

40



60

80

100



120

140


10-20 20-30 30-40 40-50 50-60 60-70 70-80 80-90 90-

100


100-

120


120-

140


140-

160


160-

180


180-

200


over

200


Dollar (in 1,000)

N

u

mb

er

 (i

n

 1,

000)

Employees

Participants

Figure 2 Compensation distribution of eligible employees and of participants

J Finan Serv Res


assets for each neighborhood. There are 10

–12 households in a nine-digit zip area on

average. Subsequently, IXI assigns a wealth rank (from 1 to 24) to the area.

The records break down contributions to DC plans into three parts: employee pre-tax

contribution, employee after-tax contribution, and employer contribution (including

employer match). All the work reported here uses employee before-tax contributions to

be comparable to most other research in 401(k) savings. In this study an employee is

considered as a participant in a DC plan in 2001 if she contributes a positive amount before

tax. By this criterion, participation rate is 71%, while 75% of the accounts have positive

balances in tax-deferred accounts. (The employees who made no contribution in 2001 but

had positive balances are probably those who had made contributions in earlier years but

not in 2001 or those working for employers who make contributions but they choose not to

contribute.)

Most plans ask employees to specify their deferral rates at the beginning of the year. The

maximum contribution allowed in 2001 was the lower of $10,500, or 25% of

compensation. Some plans impose additional limits on contributions made by highly

compensated employees (HCEs, defined as those who earned $85,000 or higher in 2001) to

ensure that the DC plans do not overly disproportionately benefit the high-income people

(see, e.g., Holden and VanDerhei

2001


). The mean deferral rate is 5.2%, and 12% of the

participants contributed the maximum amount. Figure

3

plots the relation between



participation/maximum contribution

1

and compensation. Both participation probabilities



and the probability of contributing the maximum increase with compensation. The majority

of those earning $30,000 or above participate. The majority of employees who earn about

$130,000 or above contribute the maximum. Nonetheless, about 9% of the high-income

employees do not participate at all.

1

Here we only consider maximum contribution to the IRS limit ($10,500 or 25% of compensation).



Section

3.3


discusses potential plan-specific limits that are lower than the IRS limit.

0

10



20

30

40



50

60

70



80

90

100



10-20 20-30 30-40 40-50 50-60 60-70 70-80 80-90 90-

100


100-

120


120-

140


140-

160


160-

180


180-

200


over

200


Compensation ($1,000)

%

Participation

Max-Out

Figure 3 Rates of participation and contributing and maximum at each compensation level



J Finan Serv Res

Figure

4

plots individual annual contributions for the full sample and the sub-sample



with compensation above $85,000 (HCEs). Among all participants, the modal contribution

is between $1,000 and $2,000. Those who earn more than $85,000 (16.7% of the sample)

contribute more than the typical participants, and about 39% of those earning more than

$85,000 contribute the maximum of $10,500. Figure

5

plots the contribution at different



percentiles for employees at different levels of compensation. The figure clearly shows that

high percentiles respond more intensely to increase in compensation, thereby suggesting

that the cross-sectional variance of contributions increases with compensation. Figure

6

0



5

10

15



20

25

30



35

40

45



zero

0-1


1-2

2-3


3-4

4-5


5-6

6-7


7-8

8-9


9-10

10-10.4


Max

Contribution ($1,000)

%

Full Sample

HCEs

Figure 4 Fraction of employees at each contribution level



0

2000


4000

6000


8000

10000


12000

10

20



30

40

50



60

70

80



90

10

0



11

0

12



0

13

0



14

0

15



0

16

0



17

0

18



0

19

0



20

0

21



0

22

0



23

0

24



0

25

0



Com pensation ($1,000)

C

o

ntr

ibuti

on

 by

P

e

rc

e

n

ti

le

10%


25%

50%


75%

90%


(For each compensation level, 10th, 25th, 50th, 70th and 90th percentile of contribution in dollars)

Figure 5 Contribution levels at each percentile

J Finan Serv Res


plots the wealth histogram for the general IXI population and for the Vanguard sample.

Evidently, the Vanguard sample is somewhat better off than the general population at lower

to middle wealth ranks.

The records have information about plan policies, including the presence of defined

benefit (DB) plans, the number of investable funds available, employer matching schedule

(match range and match rate), the presence of company stock as an investment option,

whether the employer

’s match is in cash or company stock, and if the latter, the restrictions

on diversification of the employer

’s match. 124 plans (covering 58% of the employees in

the sample) provide own company stocks as an investment option, among which 47

companies match employee contribution with company stocks only. 216 plans (covering

67% of the employees in the sample) offer defined-benefit plans in addition to the defined

contribution plan studied here. The number of funds offered by a plan ranges from 2 to 59

but 90% of the plans offer between 6 and 25 funds. Employers in 539 plans (covering 87%

of the employees in the sample) offer some match to their employees

’ contributions. Most

of them offer to match the employee

’s contribution up to 6% of the employee’s salary, and

the match rates range from 10 to 250%, mostly between 50 and 100%.

Exploratory data analysis is this study

’s main goal. Applying probit, one- and two-sided

Tobit, and censored median regression analyses, the exploration goes beyond simple

tabulation of averages and correlation and linear regression analyses. It affords an

understanding of the decisions made by employees regarding their 401(k) savings.

However, in the absence of a structural model, there is no single preferred specification.

2.2 Model Specification

The dependent variables studied here are: (1) A dummy variable, PART, that equals one if

the individual participates, that is, if he contributes a positive amount to his tax-deferred

account; (2) A dummy variable, MAXOUT, that equals one if the individuals contribute the

maximum amount ($10,500 in 2001) to his tax deferred account; (3) Annual contribution,

CONTRIBUTION, in dollar units or as a percentage of compensation.

The indices i and j represent individuals and plans, respectively. An individual’s benefit

from participating in a DC plan (net of cost) can be expressed as a function of a set of

0

2

4



6

8

10



12

14

16



18

20

zer



o or 

ne

gat



iv

e

un



der 1

K

1.



0-

2.

5K



2.

5-

5.



0K

5.

0-



10

K

10



-2

5K

25



-50

K

50



-75

K

75



-10

0K

10



0-

12

5K



12

5-

15



0K

15

0-



175

K

17



5-

20

0K



200

-22


5K

225


-25

0K

25



0-

30

0K



30

0-

35



0K

35

0-



40

0K

40



0-

45

0K



45

0-

50



0K

50

0-



75

0K

75



0K-

1M

ab



ov

1M


  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə