Khursheed Mama, dvm, dacva colorado State University Formulations



Yüklə 36.01 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix18.04.2017
ölçüsü36.01 Kb.

Peer Reviewed

Medications

Anesthesiology

Propofol


Khursheed Mama, DVM, DACVA

Colorado State University



Formulations

Two formulations of propofol are available for

veterinary use in the United States. Both are

isotonic 1% (10 mg/mL) macroemulsions with

10% soybean oil, 2.25% glycerol, and 1.2% egg-

lecithin. The pH is adjusted to approximately

7.5 with sodium hydroxide. 

The original formulation has no preservative and, given the medium used to solubilize propofol,

the label recommends discarding the container within 6 hours of first use to minimize microbial

or fungal contamination. Refrigeration is not recommended so as to prevent separation of active

drug from the emulsion. 

To reduce potential waste from incomplete use of an opened container of preservative-free pro-

pofol, 2% benzyl alcohol has been included in the new formulation, with a 28-day shelf life after

initial use. This formulation is only approved for use in dogs; safety and efficacy studies in cats 

are ongoing. Because the 2 formulation labels differ only slightly, users must be aware of which

propofol formulation has been selected. 

Additional nonlipid-based formulations of propofol have been evaluated to a limited extent for

use in several species and are available in Europe and Australia; macroemulsion products with

varying preservatives are also available for use in humans in the United States. 

Administration of propofol, an IV anesthetic, can 

result in dose-dependent effects, ranging from sedation

to general anesthesia.

MORE


March 2013 • 

clinician’s brief

17

Because the 2

formulation labels

differ only slightly,

users must be aware 

of which propofol

formulation 

has been selected.


Medications

Administration

Either veterinary propofol formulation may be administered over 30 to 90 seconds 

IV for induction of anesthesia. A titrated dose of 6 to 10 mg/kg is recommended in

healthy, unsedated animals. Dose reduction is suggested for compromised patients. 

Both sedation (premedication) and the addition of benzodiazepines to anesthetic

induction protocol often reduce the dose requirement (by 1–4 mg/kg) and have the

potential to reduce costs associated with propofol administration. Slow administration

(versus rapid bolus) of propofol is recommended to allow blood and brain concentra-

tions of drug to equilibrate and minimize the likelihood of a relative overdose. Slow

administration is not usually associated with excitement as with historic drugs; 

cardiovascular and respiratory effects are also minimized. 

Indications & Duration of Action 

Propofol is primarily indicated as an IV sedative to facilitate a short period of restraint

for nonpainful or minor procedures (eg, ultrasound evaluation, bandage change,

upper airway examination) or as an anesthetic induction agent to facilitate intubation

before maintenance with inhaled anesthetics. However, because of its unique pharma-

cokinetic profile (including a short context-sensitive half-time in dogs), it may be

given by repeated injection or continuous infusion to maintain total IV anesthesia

without significantly prolonging recovery. 

Propofol has also been used concurrently with inhaled anesthetic agents (partial IV

anesthesia). Analgesic drugs (eg, opioids, α

2

agents) are recommended to reduce dose



and/or provide analgesia when use is extended to painful procedures.

Propofol is metabolized and redistributed by the liver and

extrahepatic sites, resulting in an ultrashort duration of

action. The effective clinical duration of action during which

a patient can be manipulated is typically <10 minutes. Com-

plete recovery to ambulation occurs within 20 minutes (dogs)

or 30 minutes (cats) after an anesthesia induction dose and is

rapid, smooth, and excitement free. These properties also

make propofol a good choice in patients with underdevel-

oped (eg, kittens, puppies) or impaired (eg, geriatric patients,

those with a portacaval shunt) liver function. Puppy viability

after cesarean section is reportedly better following the dam’s

anesthesia induction with propofol than with other injectable

induction agents. 

Propofol is considered appropriate for patients with CNS 

disease, including refractory seizures and raised intracranial

pressure, as long as rises in CO

2

tension are minimized. The



effects on intraocular pressure are more variable and potentially influenced by other

drugs and changes in CO

2

tension. Propofol mediates CNS actions by facilitating



18

cliniciansbrief.com

• March 2013

Some patients may withdraw

limbs in reaction to a potential

burning or painful sensation

with propofol administration.


inhibitory transmission through postsynaptic activation of the GABA-

A

receptor chlo-



ride complex. It also inhibits NMDA subtype of glutamate receptor, slow calcium

channels, and voltage-gated sodium channels.



Disadvantages & Adverse Effects

Some animals (7.5% of unpremedicated dogs) may withdraw their limb in response to

propofol administration (presumably from a burning or painful sensation), but peri-

vascular injection does not cause a local inflammatory reaction. An animal may show

focal twitches or muscle fasciculations, which do not appear harmful but can be dis-

ruptive, especially if localized to the surgical site.

Cardiovascular depression may be observed when propofol is administered as an IV

bolus. This is more likely in volume-depleted patients and those with underlying car-

diovascular disease. Arterial hypotension, the most common cardiovascular effect

reported, primarily results from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance, although

negative inotropic effects have also been reported. Slow administration of the drug

and prior administration of IV fluids (5–10 mL/kg balanced electrolyte solution over

≤5–10 minutes) can help reduce these effects. However, in certain patients (eg, those

with significant mitral regurgitation or heart failure), fluid administration at this rate

may be inappropriate and could preclude propofol use. Respiratory depression to the

point of the apnea is the most common effect reported after administration and may

be minimized by slow administration.

While propofol may be used repeatedly or by infusion in dogs, cats respond less pre-

dictably, presumably from hepatic enzyme saturation (limited ability to glucuron-

idate). Prolonged recoveries following propofol infusion, Heinz body anemia, general

malaise, anorexia, and diarrhea have been reported with sequential daily administra-

tion in cats. Recent reports suggest that the magnitude of some of these changes may

be dose related. Other considerations with the macroemulsion formulation include

the potential to exacerbate hyperlipidemia (increase triglycerides) in certain disease

states. In addition to life-threatening sepsis possibly resulting from microbial contami-

nation of propofol, an increase in the incidence of wound infections has been reported

with propofol use in dogs. These findings may have been confounded by the method-

ology for administration and storage of the preservative-free intralipid compound. 



Drug Interactions

As mentioned, propofol is commonly used with IV fluids and adjunct drugs (eg, α

2

agonists, benzodiazepines, opioids). Combinations of ketamine and propofol are also



used for anesthesia induction. While concurrent use of these drugs may reduce the

dose requirement of propofol, combinations may increase the incidence of adverse

effects. Cardiovascular effects tend to vary and should be weighed in patients with

cardiovascular disease; bradycardia with concurrent use of opioids is a possible effect

but easily mitigated by administration of an anticholinergic. 

March 2013 • 

clinician’s brief

19

Consider This

Propofol is not considered an

analgesic drug; it does, however,

have the potential to cause

adverse reactions in animals that

are allergic to components of 

the emulsion (eg, soy, peanuts,

egg protein). The volume of 

drug necessary for anesthesia

induction is larger than required

for other common anesthetic 

drug combinations (eg, ketamine–

diazepam), which may be of

practical consideration if an iv

catheter has not been placed.

While generally not considered

cost prohibitive, an equivalent

dose of propofol is more

expensive than a combination 

of ketamine and diazepam. 

Recently, propofol has come

under scrutiny for its potential as

a drug of diversion and abuse

with reports of both accidental

overdose and intentional suicide

in humans. This has led the US

Drug enforcement Agency to

consider whether to assign it a

scheduled drug designation. 

Cats may recover less predictably

than do dogs with propofol

administration.

MORE


Medications

20

cliniciansbrief.com



• March 2013

Economic Impact

Although the cost of propofol is more

than the most common alternative (keta-

mine–diazepam), it is likely that the drug

costs are somewhat offset by improved

recovery time and quality. Because of the

advantages and generally manageable

disadvantages, propofol is rapidly becom-

ing the anesthetic induction agent of

choice for healthy dogs and cats. 

I

cb

Costs associated with propofol may be offset by



improved recovery time.

See Aids & Resources¸ back page, for references & suggested reading. 

For more information on anesthesia see Dr. Khursheed Mama’s

Endocrine & Anesthesia Protocols: An Exclusive Series on

cliniciansbrief.com/endocrine-anesthesia-series

Find More



Advantages

Propofol offers bronchodilation, which

may be useful in asthmatic patients and

has no detrimental effects on mucociliary

function. Its effects on splenic size are

either better or no worse than other con-

temporary induction agents. It may be

used to maintain anesthesia in patients

with malignant hyperthermia as it

doesn’t trigger this syndrome. It may also

be considered the anesthetic-induction

agent of choice in healthy greyhounds.

Propofol is reported to have antiemetic

benefits in recovery in humans. 




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə