Lightning in a Bottle: Managing Ideas to Spur Innovation David Dahl Academic Libraries and Innovation



Yüklə 130.51 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix04.05.2017
ölçüsü130.51 Kb.

297

Lightning in a Bottle: Managing Ideas to Spur 

Innovation

David Dahl

Academic Libraries and Innovation

Innovation  is  an  important  component  of  the  aca-

demic  library.  In  an  environment  where  new  tech-

nologies and resources are clouding the information 

world, it is essential for libraries to continue to be at 

the forefront of innovations impacting the informa-

tion world.

Robin Bergart and M.J. D’Elia project that “if you 

take a look at your library’s mission or vision state-

ment, there is good chance you will find a reference to 

innovation”.

1

 And, in fact, a simple Google search for 



“library  mission  statement  innovation”  does  indeed 

demonstrate that many academic libraries include the 

word innovation in their mission statements.

As  higher  education  institutions  increasingly 

adapt  business  models  and  strategies  from  the  cor-

porate  world,  academic  libraries  must  do  the  same. 

This effort is already evidenced through recent pub-

lications addressing ROI and assessment of the value 

of libraries.

2

 Libraries will also benefit from following 



the guidance of corporate practices when it comes to 

innovation. This paper seeks to review and organize 

much of the seminal research from the business and 

management literature related to innovation, specifi-

cally the portion of the innovation process that ad-

dresses the generation and management of ideas, in 

an effort to apply it to the academic library environ-

ment.  Following  this  review,  best  practices  will  be 

suggested to help libraries improve the beginning of 

the innovation process, commonly referred to as the 

“fuzzy front end”.

Innovation Defined

What is Innovation?

Innovation is often used synonymously or in accom-

paniment  with  technological  advancement.  While 

new and improved technologies are innovations, the 

implication of technology when referring to the term 

innovation is too restrictive. Everett Rogers defines in-

novation more broadly as “an idea, practice, or object 

that is perceived as new by an individual or other unit 

of adoption”.

3

 While more inclusive, this view of in-



novation is problematic as ideas are commonly seen 

as a component of innovation rather than as an in-

novation itself. Gerald Zaltman, Robert Duncan, and 

Jonny Holbek summarize two other contexts for the 

term innovation: (1) innovation as synonymous with 

the term invention and (2) innovation as the process 

of  adopting  something  innovative.

4

  Semantically, 



these two contexts can be reduced to the difference 

between a noun and a verb, respectively. In the latter 

instance, innovation is used as an activity (i.e. “doing” 

innovation). Innovation as an activity is the process 

of  innovating.  In  the  former  context,  innovation  is 

viewed retrospectively as the end result of this process 

of innovating. This paradoxical use of the term inno-

vation as both the process and the end result has led to 

numerous variations in the definition of innovation.

David Dahl is Emerging Technologies Librarian at Towson University, e-mail: ddahl@towson.edu



David Dahl

298

ACRL 2011



Types of Innovation

Most often, the notion of innovation as an end result 

brings to mind the creation of new products. This re-

lates directly to Zaltman, Duncan and Holbek’s first 

context of innovation as an invention. However, other 

types of innovation do exist, including service inno-

vations and process innovations.

5

 This is important to 



keep in mind as these types of innovations are more 

likely to be produced by academic libraries, which of-

ten rely on vendors to create innovative products. In 

addition to product, process, and service innovations 

some innovations have larger social implications, re-

ferred  to  as  social  innovations  or  paradigm  innova-

tions.

6

  While  it  is  unlikely  (though  not  impossible) 



that  an  individual  library  would  produce  this  type 

of  innovation,  social  innovations  have  the  potential 

to impact the way academic libraries function. Like 

product innovations, social innovations often affect or 

lead to service and process innovations. As Table 1 in-

dicates, innovation types are not mutually exclusive.

7

The second means of categorizing innovation is in 



terms of its impact on the adopting unit. Innovations 

can be characterized as either incremental or radical.

8

 

Incremental  innovations  are  evolutionary  in  nature 



and focus on gradual improvement. Radical innova-

tions, referred to as discontinuous innovations by Su-

san Reid and Ulrike de Brentani,

9

 have the tendency 



to change the processes and thinking for the adopting 

unit. Oftentimes, innovations do not take on their dis-

continuous nature until they have been implemented 

for some time. This is due to the S-shaped curve trend 

of adoption as presented by Rogers.

10

 As more users 



adopt an innovation, its potential to become discon-

tinuous increases. For academic libraries, it is impor-

tant to decide whether they wish to reinvent a certain 

product,  service,  etc.  (radical  innovation)  or  make 

small improvements, keeping the same foundational 

principles (incremental innovation).



The Innovation Process

Regardless of the nature of the resulting innovation, 

the activity of doing innovation is frequently analyzed 

as a process. Zaltman, Duncan, and Holbek propose 

a model for the innovation process in organizations 

that consists of five substages: (1) knowledge-aware-

ness, (2) formation of attitudes toward the innovation, 

(3) decision, (4) initial implementation, and (5) con-

tinued-sustained  implementation.  These  substages 

are grouped into two main stages called the initiation 

stage (substages 1, 2, and 3) and the implementation 

stage  (substages  4  and  5).

11

  Other  innovation  mod-



els can be, and often are, divided to fit this two-stage 

scheme. The initiation stage deals with the innovation 

in an abstract way. Ideas and knowledge are shared to 

help form a clear understanding of what the innova-

tion should be. The implementation stage is initiated 

when the idea for the innovation has been finalized 

and a decision to implement the innovation has been 

made.


The Fuzzy Front End

The abstract nature of the initiation stage has lead re-

searchers and practitioners alike to refer to this stage 

as the fuzzy front end. The term was first popularized 

in 1991 by Preston Smith and Donald Reinertsen in 

their  book  Developing  Products  in  Half  the  Time.

12

 

This  stage  consists  of  generating,  collecting,  adopt-



ing,  clustering,  screening,  selecting,  and  improving 

ideas.


13

 Reinertsen views the fuzzy front end as a “pre-

cursor to a betting process…The purpose of the [fuzzy 

front end] is to alter the economic terms of the bets 

we place on product development”.

14

 In other words, 



focusing efforts on improving the effectiveness and ef-

ficiency of the fuzzy front end can reduce the risk of 

failure and lead to more successful innovations. Peter 

Koen et al. see the fuzzy front end as one of the larg-

est opportunities for making the innovation process 

more effective.

15

This early stage in the innovation process must be 



systematically  structured  in  order  for  innovation  to 

succeed.


16

 However, Heinz-Juergen Boeddrich claims 

that many managers do not feel that this stage of the 

innovation  process  can  or  should  be  managed  be-

cause of the creative nature of idea generation, a line 

Table 1

Types of Innovation and examples of each

Type of Innovation Library-related Examples

Product

Next-generation catalogs and 



discovery tools, Internet, iPad

Process


Assembly line, next-generation 

catalogs and discovery tools

Service

Twitter, next-generation 



catalogs and discovery tools, IM 

reference services

Social/Paradigm

Open access, Web 2.0, Creative 

Commons


Lightning in a Bottle: Managing Ideas to Spur Innovation

299

March 30–April 2, 2011, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

of thinking he refers to as “the fantasy route to inno-

vation”.


17

 It is perhaps because of the belief that the 

front end of the innovation process cannot be struc-

tured that the fuzzy front end provides an opportu-

nity for improving the innovation process. Of course, 

Boeddrich also warns against the over-structuring of 

the front end stage, referring to the other route as the 

“technocratic route to innovation”.

18

 Instead, a com-



promise between the two extremes is suggested.

As in Zaltman, Duncan, and Holbek’s segmenta-

tion of the initiation stage, the fuzzy front end can be 

divided into three main segments: (1) idea generation, 

(2)  idea  development,  and  (3)  idea  selection.  While 

other variations of this model do exist, most represent 

this same basic structure with more or less specific-

ity for certain segments and different terminology to 

describe each phase. In an attempt to apply the orga-

nizational factors of culture and structure to the fuzzy 

front end, Christiaan van Dijk and Jan van den Ende 

identify the three phases as idea extraction, idea land-

ing, and idea follow-up.

19

 This model takes for granted 



the generation of ideas and skips directly to the shar-

ing of ideas by employees of the organization. It as-

sumes that the ideas which become innovations are 

already in the minds of those whom contribute ideas 

to  the  organization.  While  it  has  been  shown  that 

quantity  of  ideas  alone  does  not  necessarily  lead  to 

better  innovations,  overlooking  the  idea  generation 

stage altogether can cause an organization to miss out 

on valuable opportunities. 

Idea Generation

The idea generation stage provides an opportunity to 

both  focus  and  motivate  the  creation  of  new  ideas. 

Those  who  wish  to  achieve  any  type  of  innovation 

must  encourage  ideas  and  provide  guidance  for  the 

scope of ideas. Koen et al. account for the need for 

guidance by incorporating two more stages into the 

fuzzy front end of innovation. In their New Concept 

Development  Model,  both  Opportunity  Identifica-

tion and Opportunity Analysis precede the idea gen-

eration  stage.

20

  If  innovation  is  taken  as  a  solution 



to  a  problem,  then  the  identification  and  analysis 

of opportunities is comparable to the discovery and 

sharing of problems that need to be addressed by an 

organization.  Without  an  identified  need  or  oppor-

tunity  the  process  of  generating  ideas  (and  innova-

tion for that matter) is merely self-serving. A study 

documented by Zaltman, Duncan, and Holbek deter-

mined that 75% of ideas are stimulated by identified 

opportunities whereas only 25% originated from pre-

vious knowledge which was then found to address a 

certain need.

21

 Identifying and analyzing a need for 



innovation allows individuals to generate ideas within 

a practicable set of boundaries. Not only do needs cre-

ate a focus for idea generation, but it also serves as one 

of the main motivators for producing new ideas. In a 

survey of industry workers, approximately half of all 

respondents identified themselves as problem-solvers, 

30% of whom said they were able to generate possible 

solutions as soon as the problem was identified.

22

 

While the ability to identify needs and problems 



is an important factor in idea generation, the ability of 

individuals and the organization to acquire and share 

knowledge is equally necessary. Michael Mumford et 

al. believe that the acquisition of knowledge requires 

expertise,  and  the  complexity  of  most  problems  re-

quires different forms of expertise. This makes collab-

oration an important part of idea generation.

23

 How-



ever, a study by Karan Girotra, Christian Terwiesch, 

and Karl Ulrich found that working in teams was not 

the most effective method for producing high quality 

ideas. Rather, a hybrid process where individuals first 

generate ideas on their own and then share them in a 

group setting produced more ideas and higher quality 

ideas.

24

As  important  as  the  motivational  factors  are  to 



idea generation, it is equally important to understand 

from  whom  new  ideas  originate.  Langdon  Morris 

identifies the generators of ideas as creative geniuses, 

who “work everywhere in the organization” and of-

ten  are  individuals  outside  organizations,  including 

vendors, suppliers, and customers.

25

 Jennie Bjork and 



Mats Magnusson stress that “the sources for innova-

tion  ideas  cannot  rely  only  on  a  few  individuals”.

26

 

Rather,  ideas  should  be  encouraged  from  everyone. 



In corporations, these creative geniuses are often the 

front line workers who interact with customers and 

possess the ability to understand the reality of their 

environment and envision the potential for improve-

ments.

27

  They  often  do  more  than  what  is  required 



from them as an employee as they seek out organiza-

tional problems and needs and investigate potential 

solutions.

Idea Development

The sharing of generated ideas marks the beginning 

of the idea development stage of the fuzzy front end 


David Dahl

300

ACRL 2011

of the innovation process. This phase helps turn a raw 

idea that an individual creates into a mature idea that 

has the potential to be selected and implemented as 

an  innovation.  The  creative  geniuses  who  produce 

ideas often do not have the ability to turn their ideas 

into practicable solutions.

28

 During idea development 



it is important for others, especially innovation cham-

pions


29

, to work with the idea and help it involve into 

an implementable idea. 

While suggestion systems are first and foremost a 

means of collecting suggestions from various sourc-

es, such as employees, the scope of their use has ex-

panded to support the idea development stage as well. 

This is largely due to the increased use of information 

systems within organizations.

30

 A successful sugges-



tion system needs to offer a means for others within 

the organization to provide feedback on the idea with 

the intent of improving it and increasing its chance 

of implementation. The idea may not be shared with 

everyone immediately depending on the preference of 

the creative genius who generated the idea. Some may 

choose a smaller group with whom to initially share 

their ideas before presenting them to a larger audi-

ence. This is represented in Han Bakker, Kees Boers-

ma,  and  Sytse  Oreel’s  Crea-Political  Process  Model, 

which  divides  the  individual’s  relationships  within 

the  organization  into  three  separate  organizational 

circles: intimate, professional, and managerial.

31

 Many 



individuals will choose to gather feedback from their 

immediate network (i.e. intimate) before distributing 

their ideas more widely.

Several models and diagrams exist for electronic 

suggestion systems.

32

 However, a system for managing 



suggestions does not need to be encompassed within 

an  information  system.  While  this  is  often  a  useful 

method to manage the idea development process, it is 

more important that ideas be shared widely, that the 

creative genius or those who champion the idea re-

ceive feedback, and that the developed idea fits within 

the goals of the organization and the requirements for 

a solution to the need being addressed (e.g. deadlines 

for implantation, budget, etc.). The idea development 

process is important as individuals are not always able 

to evaluate their own ideas well.

33

 



Idea Selection

Two  potential  scenarios  exist  for  the  idea  selection 

stage: (1) the best idea must be chosen from several op-

tions, or (2) a single idea (without any competing ideas) 

must be adopted or rejected. In either scenario, the end 

goal is to implement only the highest quality ideas. Idea 

quality is defined as a combination of feasibility and 

originality. The best ideas are typically creative but also 

grounded in reality in order to possess potential for im-

plementation.

34

 It is commonly believed that a higher 



quantity of ideas will lead to higher quality ideas. This 

is not necessarily true.

35

 Rather, factors such as the cre-



ative  genius’  network  centrality  within  the  organiza-

tion


36

  and  a  hybrid  brainstorming  structure

37

  lead  to 



the production of the highest quality ideas.

The individual or group responsible for the selec-

tion of ideas for implementation may vary depending 

on the potential impact of the innovation. If the in-

novation impacts only the generator of the idea, then 

they may also be the decision-maker in the innovation 

process. If the idea has widespread impact, especially 

in relationship to labor and budget, it is important that 

the best idea is chosen. Girotra, Terwiesch, and Ulrich 

found  that  better  ideas  were  selected  by  those  who 

were  unaware  of  the  details  of  the  process  through 

which the idea was generated and developed.

38

 This 


may be due to biases that the owners of an idea have 

toward it. Reinertsen identifies two potential mistakes 

that can be made during the idea selection stage: (1) a 

good idea could be rejected and (2) a bad idea could 

be accepted. The latter seems more likely to occur if 

an  idea  owners  biases  affect  the  decision  process.

39

 

While rejecting a good idea is a lost opportunity, the 



acceptance of a bad idea can be far more costly. In the 

models  of  the  innovation  process  discussed  above, 

the selection stage is the dividing line between the in-

novation as an idea and the implementation of that 

idea. At this point, money, labor, and other resources 

are usually invested in the innovation. The fuzzy front 

end process has little cost and risk associated with it 

compared to the implementation process.



Suggestions for Libraries

Create Structure

As  Boeddrich  states,  it  is  important  to  find  a  good 

compromise between imposing structure and allow-

ing  freedom  for  exploration  during  the  fuzzy  front 

end  of  innovation.  A  good  place  to  start  imposing 

structure is on those factors that affect the generation 

of  ideas.  Innovation  leaders  should  make  sure  that 

channels are implemented so that both internal and 

external knowledge can be accessed by any employ-

ee who desires it. This includes sharing results from 



Lightning in a Bottle: Managing Ideas to Spur Innovation

301

March 30–April 2, 2011, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

formalized assessment, sharing usage data and other 

library  statistics,  widely  distributing  feedback  from 

patrons  and  other  external  customers,  and  pushing 

out information about new trends and developments 

that may have an impact on academic libraries. This 

knowledge will help produce more informed and po-

tentially implementable ideas, possibly avoiding some 

of the issues of creative ideas that Levitt mentions.

40

 

Committees



Oftentimes committees or other working groups are 

relied upon to generate (or discover) ideas and imple-

ment solutions within the academic library. However, 

as Girotra, Terwiesch, and Ulrich found, group brain-

storming is not as effective for generating innovative 

ideas as a hybrid model.

41

 Thus, rather than beginning 



the idea generation process with a group brainstorm-

ing session, it is suggested that individuals are allowed 

(and even required) to generate ideas individually in 

advance of meeting and sharing ideas with the larger 

group. This will produce more variation in the pro-

posed ideas, which may lead to a higher quality idea 

that  may  not  have  surfaced  in  a  group  brainstorm 

session where individuals are more likely to build on 

the ideas of others rather than suggesting potentially 

tangential ideas. The goal of effective idea generation, 

typically, is to produce one great idea; theoretically, it 

does not matter whether the other proposed ideas are 

good or bad.

In accordance with general practices for effective 

idea  generation,  individual  idea  generation  should 

be  informed  by  the  factors  mentioned  above  that 

help create focus in idea generation: budgetary con-

straints, deadlines for implementation, relevant litera-

ture and external knowledge, and a clear description 

of the problem or need to be addressed. Committee 

chairs or group leaders should provide this and any 

other relevant information to their potential creative 

geniuses well in advance of meeting as a group. 

Identify Innovation Champions

The individuals who generate ideas are not necessar-

ily equipped to carry out the implementation of the 

idea.  As  Levitt  describes,  they  may  not  even  be  ca-

pable of turning their creative ideas into practicable 

ideas.


42

 The success of a raw idea requires the help of 

one or more people who possess knowledge of the li-

brary’s strategic plans and values and are able to refine 

the idea in order to tie it to organizational outcomes. 

These innovation champions are able to promote the 

idea in terms that help sell the idea to decision-mak-

ers.


43

 They also tend to have a wide network within 

the organization, which allows them to gather feed-

back  from  various  departments  and  get  buy-in  for 

the idea.

44

 As either a creative genius who is generat-



ing ideas or an administrator attempting to get better 

ideas, identifying innovation champions within your 

organization is an unrecognized yet important task. 

Employees who fit the characteristics of an innovation 

champion should be encouraged to embrace this role 

and rewarded for their efforts. 



Reward Great Ideas

Many companies provide monetary rewards for em-

ployees  who  generate  ideas.  This  seems  to  occur 

mostly in companies that have invested in electronic 

suggestion and idea management systems. Beyond fi-

nancial rewards, the implementation of an idea can 

be a big incentive for producing ideas. If employees 

and  external  customers  feel  their  ideas  are  actually 

being utilized, they will be more likely to contribute 

more ideas in the future. Not implementing ideas can 

have the opposite effect of discouraging the genera-

tion of new ideas. As employees continue to suggest 

new ideas, their understanding of the need for ratio-

nality during the innovation process increases.

45

 This 


increased  understanding  has  the  potential  to  trans-

form employees who fit the creative genius role into 

innovation champions.

Conclusion

Innovation is commonly associated with risk and un-

predictability, and failure is seen as a natural element 

of  the  innovation  process.

46

  However,  libraries  can 



improve their innovation successes and produce less 

costly failures by looking carefully at the fuzzy front 

end of the innovation process. The variety of needs 

to be addressed by the innovation process in librar-

ies  is  too  expansive  to  suggest  one  concrete  system 

or model for managing the innovation process. More 

work should be done to investigate best practices that 

libraries can follow for each step in the idea manage-

ment process. However, a review of the business and 

management literature on the front end of the innova-

tion process indicates that libraries should encourage 

and seek out the generation of ideas from all employ-

ees and patrons; impose organizational structures to 

aid the flow of information, needs, and ideas; identify 



David Dahl

302

ACRL 2011

individuals who possess the characteristics of certain 

innovation roles; and focus on putting forth mature, 

well-defined ideas for implementation.

Notes

  1.  Robin Bergart and M. J. D’Elia, Innovation: The Lan-

guage of Learning Libraries, Vol. 38, 2010), 606.

  2.  Paula Kaufman and Sarah Barbara Watstein, “Library 

Value  (Return  on  Investment,  ROI)  and  the  Challenge  of 

Placing a Value on Public Services,” Reference Services Review 

36, no. 3 (08, 2008), 226–231. ; Svanhild Aabø, “Libraries and 

Return on Investment (ROI): A Meta-Analysis,” New Library 

World 110, no. 7 (07, 2009), 311–324.; Megan Oakleaf, The 

Value of Academic Libraries: A Comprehensive Research Re-

view and Report (Chicago, IL: Association of College and Re-

search Libraries, 2010), 210, http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/

divs/acrl/issues/value/val_report.pdf (accessed December 5, 

2010).; Carol Tenopir, “Measuring the Value of the Academic 

Library: Return on Investment and Other Value Measures,” 

Serials Librarian 58, no. 1–4 (Jan, 2010), 39–48.

  3  Everett M. Rogers, Diffusion of Innovations, 5th ed. 

(New York: Free Press, 2003), 12.

  4.  Gerald Zaltman, Robert Duncan and Jonny Holbek, 

Innovations and Organizations (New York: Wiley, 1973), 7–8.

  5.  Harvard  Business  Essentials:  Managing  Creativity 

and Innovation. (Boston, Mass.: Harvard Business School 

Press, 2003), 7–11.

  6.  Alexander  Brem  and  Kai-Ingo  Voigt,  “Innovation 

Management in Emerging Technology Ventures: The Con-

cept of an Integrated Idea Management,” International Jour-

nal of Technology, Policy and Management 7, no. 3 (2007), 

305,  http://www.industriebetriebslehre.wiso.uni-erlangen.

de/lehrstuhl/IJTPM-Br-Vo.pdf (accessed January 5, 2011).; 

Jennie Björk and Mats Magnusson, “Where do Good Inno-

vation Ideas Come from? Exploring the Influence of Net-

work Connectivity on Innovation Idea Quality,” Journal of 

Product Innovation Management 26, no. 6 (11, 2009), 663.

  7.  Brem and Voigt, Innovation Management in Emerg-

ing Technology Ventures: The Concept of an Integrated Idea 

Management, 305.

  8.  Harvard  Business  Essentials:  Managing  Creativity 

and Innovation, 2–7.

  9.  Susan E. Reid and Ulrike de Brentani, “The Fuzzy 

Front End of New Product Development for Discontinu-

ous Innovations: A Theoretical Model,” Journal of Product 

Innovation Management 21, no. 3 (05, 2004), 176.

  10.  Rogers, Diffusion of Innovations, 41.

  11.  Zaltman, Duncan and Holbek, Innovations and Or-

ganizations, 60–69.

  12.  Reid and de Brentani, The Fuzzy Front End of New 

Product Development for Discontinuous Innovations: A The-

oretical Model, 171.

  13.  Heinz-Juergen Boeddrich, “Ideas in the Workplace: 

A New Approach Towards Organizing the Fuzzy Front End 

of the Innovation Process,” Creativity & Innovation Man-

agement 13, no. 4 (12, 2004), 275. 

  14.  Donald G. Reinertsen, “Taking the Fuzziness Out of 

the Fuzzy Front End,” Research Technology Management 42, 

no. 6 (Nov, 1999), 25.

  15.  Peter  Koen  and  others,  “Providing  Clarity  and  a 

Common  Language  to  the  ‘Fuzzy  Front  End.’,”  Research 

Technology Management 44, no. 2 (Mar, 2001), 46.

  16.  Boeddrich, Ideas in the Workplace: A New Approach 

Towards Organizing the Fuzzy Front End of the Innovation 

Process, 274.

  17.  Ibid., 275

  18.  Ibid., 275

  19.  C. van Dijk and J. van den Ende, “Suggestion Sys-

tems:  Transferring  Employee  Creativity  into  Practicable 

Ideas,” R&D Management 32, no. 5 (11, 2002), 387–395.

  20.  Koen and others, Providing Clarity and a Common 

Language to the ‘Fuzzy Front End.’, 50–51.

  21.  Zaltman, Duncan and Holbek, Innovations and Or-

ganizations, 118.

  22.  G. Ekvall, “Creativity at the Place of Work: Studies of 

Suggestors and Suggestion Systems in Industry.” The Jour-

nal of Creative Behavior (1976), 54.

  23.  Michael D. Mumford and others, “Leading Creative 

People:  Orchestrating  Expertise  and  Relationships,”  The 

Leadership Quarterly 13, no. 6 (12, 2002), 708–709.

  24.  Karan Girotra, Christian Terwiesch and Karl T. Ul-

rich, “Idea Generation and the Quality of the Best Idea,” 

Management Science 56, no. 4 (04, 2010), 591–605. 

  25.  Langdon Morris, “Creating the Innovation Culture: 

Geniuses, Champions, and Leaders” (White Paper, Innova-

tion  Labs,  2007),  http://www.innovationlabs.com/innova-

tion_culture2.html (accessed February 25, 2009).

  26.  Björk  and  Magnusson,  Where  do  Good  Innovation 

Ideas Come from? Exploring the Influence of Network Con-

nectivity on Innovation Idea Quality, 664.

  27.  Morris,  Creating  the  Innovation  Culture:  Geniuses, 

Champions, and Leaders, 8.

  28.  Theodore  Levitt,  “Creativity  is  Not  enough,”  Har-

vard Business Review 80, no. 8 (08, 2002), 137–145.

  29.  Morris,  Creating  the  Innovation  Culture:  Geniuses, 

Champions, and Leaders, 11–13.

  30.  James F. Fairbank, William E. Spangler and Scott Da-

vid Williams, “Motivating Creativity through a Computer-



Lightning in a Bottle: Managing Ideas to Spur Innovation

303

March 30–April 2, 2011, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Mediated Employee Suggestion Management System,” Be-

haviour & Information Technology 22, no. 5 (Sep, 2003), 306.

  31.  Han Bakker, Kees Boersma and Sytse Oreel, “Cre-

ativity (Ideas) Management in Industrial R&D Organiza-

tions:  A  Crea-Political  Process  Model  and  an  Empirical 

Illustration of Corus RD&T,” Creativity & Innovation Man-

agement 15, no. 3 (09, 2006), 300–301.

  32.  Ibid., 303; Fairbank, Spangler and Williams, Moti-

vating  Creativity  through  a  Computer-Mediated  Employee 

Suggestion  Management  System,  312.;  Norman  R.  Baker 

and James R. Freeland, “Structuring Information Flow to 

Enhance  Innovation,”  Management  Science  19,  no.  1  (09, 

1972), 106.

  33.  Girotra, Terwiesch and Ulrich, Idea Generation and 

the Quality of the Best Idea, 593.

  34.  Eric F. Rietzschel, Bernard A. Nijstad and Wolfgang 

Stroebe, “The Selection of Creative Ideas After Individual 

Idea  Generation:  Choosing  between  Creativity  and  Im-

pact,” British Journal of Psychology 101, no. 1 (02, 2010), 48.

  35.  Björk  and  Magnusson,  Where  do  Good  Innovation 

Ideas Come from? Exploring the Influence of Network Con-

nectivity on Innovation Idea Quality, 669.

  36.  Ibid.

  37.  Girotra, Terwiesch and Ulrich, Idea Generation and 

the Quality of the Best Idea, 591–605.

  38.  Ibid., 595

  39.  Reinertsen,  Taking  the  Fuzziness  Out  of  the  Fuzzy 

Front End, 26.

  40.  Levitt, Creativity is Not enough, 137–145.

  41.  Girotra, Terwiesch and Ulrich, Idea Generation and 

the Quality of the Best Idea, 591–605.

  42.  Levitt, Creativity is Not enough, 137–145.

  43.  Jane  M.  Howell  and  Kathleen  Boies,  “Champions 

of Technological Innovation: The Influence of Contextual 

Knowledge,  Role  Orientation,  Idea  Generation,  and  Idea 

Promotion  on  Champion  Emergence,”  Leadership  Quar-

terly 15, no. 1 (02, 2004), 136–137.

  44.  Morris,  Creating  the  Innovation  Culture:  Geniuses, 

Champions, and Leaders, 11–12.

  45.  Ekvall, Creativity at the Place of Work: Studies of Sug-

gestors and Suggestion Systems in Industry., 53.

  46.  Morris,  Creating  the  Innovation  Culture:  Geniuses, 

Champions, and Leaders, 6.

Bibliography 

Harvard Business Essentials: Managing Creativity and Inno-

vation. Boston, Mass.: Harvard Business School Press, 

2003. 


Aabø,  Svanhild.  “Libraries  and  Return  on  Investment 

(ROI): A Meta-Analysis.” New Library World 110, no. 7 

(07, 2009): 311–324. 

Baker, Norman R. and James R. Freeland. “Structuring In-

formation Flow to Enhance Innovation.” Management 

Science 19, no. 1 (09, 1972): 105–116. 

Bakker,  Han,  Kees  Boersma,  and  Sytse  Oreel.  “Creativity 

(Ideas) Management in Industrial R&D Organizations: 

A Crea-Political Process Model and an Empirical Illus-

tration of Corus RD&T.” Creativity & Innovation Man-

agement 15, no. 3 (09, 2006): 296–309. 

Bergart, Robin and M. J. D’Elia. . Innovation: The Language 

of Learning Libraries. Vol. 38, 2010. 

Björk, Jennie and Mats Magnusson. “Where do Good In-

novation  Ideas  Come  from?  Exploring  the  Influence 

of Network Connectivity on Innovation Idea Quality.” 

Journal  of  Product  Innovation  Management  26,  no.  6 

(11, 2009): 662–670. 

Boeddrich, Heinz-Juergen. “Ideas in the Workplace: A New 

Approach Towards Organizing the Fuzzy Front End of 

the Innovation Process.” Creativity & Innovation Man-

agement 13, no. 4 (12, 2004): 274–285. 

Brem,  Alexander  and  Kai-Ingo  Voigt.  “Innovation  Man-

agement in Emerging Technology Ventures: The Con-

cept of an Integrated Idea Management.” International 

Journal of Technology, Policy and Management 7, no. 

3 (2007): 304–321, http://www.industriebetriebslehre.

wiso.uni-erlangen.de/lehrstuhl/IJTPM-Br-Vo.pdf  (ac-

cessed January 5, 2011). 

Ekvall, G. “Creativity at the Place of Work: Studies of Sug-

gestors and Suggestion Systems in Industry.” The Jour-

nal of Creative Behavior (1976). 

Fairbank, James F., William E. Spangler, and Scott David 

Williams. “Motivating Creativity through a Computer-

Mediated Employee Suggestion Management System.” 

Behaviour  &  Information  Technology  22,  no.  5  (Sep, 

2003): 305. 

Girotra,  Karan,  Christian  Terwiesch,  and  Karl  T.  Ulrich. 

“Idea  Generation  and  the  Quality  of  the  Best  Idea.” 

Management Science 56, no. 4 (04, 2010): 591–605. 

Howell, Jane M. and Kathleen Boies. “Champions of Tech-

nological  Innovation:  The  Influence  of  Contextual 

Knowledge,  Role  Orientation,  Idea  Generation,  and 

Idea Promotion on Champion Emergence.” Leadership 

Quarterly 15, no. 1 (02, 2004): 123. 

Kaufman, Paula and Sarah Barbara Watstein. “Library Val-

ue (Return on Investment, ROI) and the Challenge of 

Placing a Value on Public Services.” Reference Services 

Review 36, no. 3 (08, 2008): 226–231. 

Koen, Peter, Greg Ajamian, Robert Burkart, Allen Clamen, 



David Dahl

304

ACRL 2011

Jeffrey Davidson, Robb D’Amore, Claudia Elkins, et al. 

“Providing  Clarity  and  a  Common  Language  to  the 

‘Fuzzy Front End.’.” Research Technology Management 

44, no. 2 (Mar, 2001): 46. 

Levitt, Theodore. “Creativity is Not enough.” Harvard Busi-

ness Review 80, no. 8 (08, 2002): 137–145. 

Morris,  Langdon.  “Creating  the  Innovation  Culture:  Ge-

niuses, Champions, and Leaders.” White Paper, Inno-

vation Labs, , http://www.innovationlabs.com/innova-

tion_culture2.html (accessed February 25, 2009). 

Mumford, Michael D., Ginamarie M. Scott, Blaine Gaddis, 

and Jill M. Strange. “Leading Creative People: Orches-

trating  Expertise  and  Relationships.”  The  Leadership 

Quarterly 13, no. 6 (12, 2002): 705–750. 

Oakleaf, Megan. The Value of Academic Libraries: A Com-

prehensive  Research  Review  and  Report.  Chicago,  IL: 

Association of College and Research Libraries, 2010, 

http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/issues/value/

val_report.pdf (accessed December 5, 2010). 

Reid, Susan E. and Ulrike de Brentani. “The Fuzzy Front 

End of New Product Development for Discontinuous 

Innovations: A Theoretical Model.” Journal of Product 

Innovation Management 21, no. 3 (05, 2004): 170–184. 

Reinertsen,  Donald  G.  “Taking  the  Fuzziness  Out  of  the 

Fuzzy  Front  End.”  Research  Technology  Management 

42, no. 6 (Nov, 1999): 25. 

Rietzschel, Eric F., Bernard A. Nijstad, and Wolfgang Stroe-

be. “The Selection of Creative Ideas After Individual 

Idea  Generation:  Choosing  between  Creativity  and 

Impact.” British Journal of Psychology 101, no. 1 (02, 

2010): 47–68. 

Rogers,  Everett  M.  Diffusion  of  Innovations.  5th  ed.  New 

York: Free Press, 2003. 

Tenopir, Carol. “Measuring the Value of the Academic Li-

brary:  Return  on  Investment  and  Other  Value  Mea-

sures.” Serials Librarian 58, no. 1–4 (Jan, 2010): 39–48. 

van  Dijk,  C.  and  J.  van  den  Ende.  “Suggestion  Systems: 

Transferring  Employee  Creativity  into  Practicable 

Ideas.”  R&D  Management  32,  no.  5  (11,  2002):  387–

395.


Zaltman, Gerald, Robert Duncan, and Jonny Holbek. In-

novations and Organizations. New York: Wiley, 1973. 




Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə