Pm eMedicine Case Study



Yüklə 30.59 Kb.

tarix06.02.2017
ölçüsü30.59 Kb.

11/29/2007 05:38 PM

eMedicine Case Study

Page 1 of 4

http://master.emedicine.com/email/image/image96/image96answer.html

Recurrent Painful and Purulent Lesions of the Groin

Ensure delivery by adding imagecase@email.emedicine.com to your address book.



ANSWER

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS): The image shows tender, inflamed papules and nodules, with active

drainage of purulent material. The patient’s CBC revealed underlying anemia associated with her chronic

disease. Regional lymphadenopathy was typically absent, and the characteristically foul odor of chronic

HS was noted.

HS is a disorder of the terminal follicular epithelium in apocrine gland–bearing skin. It most commonly

occurs in regions rich in apocrine glands, such as the axilla, the groin, the perineum, and the perianal

region. The condition can also occur on the buttocks, the scrotum, and the submammary areas. HS in

the perineal region tends to be the most severe. The onset of disease is often correlated with the


11/29/2007 05:38 PM

eMedicine Case Study

Page 2 of 4

http://master.emedicine.com/email/image/image96/image96answer.html

development of apocrine sweat glands after puberty (most frequently in the second and third decades of

life). HS is thought to affect 1% of the population worldwide, and it most often affects women, with a

female-to-male ratio of 2-5:1.

HS is believed to start with the formation of keratin comedones in the apocrine-gland follicles. This leads

to occlusion of the apocrine ducts with subsequent superimposed inflammation and infection.

Abscesses eventually form, with chronic infection that spreads in the area of involvement, induration,

and sinus tract and fistula formation. Episodes of acute cellulitis are a common complication of HS. The

early lesions of HS are isolated pruritic nodules that may be painful and may persist for weeks or

months without change. The nodules typically develop into pustules that eventually rupture, draining

blood-stained, purulent material. Recurrences then develop at the original site. The severity and natural

course of the condition vary from patient to patient, but untreated HS is typically a relentless, progressive

disease. Acute exacerbations and remissions are characteristic, often leading to sinus-tract formation

with marked scarring.

The cause of HS is unknown, though current theories suggest a multifactorial etiology. Conditions that

may contribute to the development of HS include genetic predisposition, obesity, and local frictional

trauma. Local folliculitis or previous episodes of skin infection with organisms such as streptococci,

staphylococci, and Escherichia coli may also be part of the etiology of HS. Hormonal factors, such as

low levels of estrogen and/or high levels of androgens, are also thought to predispose patients to HS;

this accounts for the increased incidence or severity of HS with pregnancy and oral contraceptive use.

Poor hygiene does not cause HS, and the disease is not contagious.

HS is clinically recognized to have 3 stages of progression, which dictate therapeutic intervention. Stage

1 is characterized by single or multiple abscesses without sinus tracts or scarring. Stage 2 is

characterized by recurrent abscesses with sinus-tract formation and scarring. Finally, diffuse or broad

involvement with multiple interconnected sinus tracts and abscesses characterize stage 3.

Nonspecific therapeutic measures for all patients with HS include good hygiene, weight reduction, use of

antiseptic detergents, and avoidance of tight-fitting clothes. Acute-stage treatments include a 2-week

course of antibiotics that may include a combination of erythromycin and metronidazole, minocycline, or

clindamycin. In addition, intralesional steroid injections may cause early lesions to involute within 12-24

hours of injection. For patients with chronic relapsing disease, treatment options include long-term

antibiotics, high-dose systemic steroids, estrogens, and retinoids. Stage 2 or 3 disease with chronic

sinus tracts may be treated with total wide excision and healing with flaps and/or grafts.

This patient was initially treated with topical silver sulfadiazine (Silvadene) and systemic

amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium (Augmentin). With this therapy, the patient’s associated cellulitis

markedly improved, and the chronic inflammation that had characterized her condition partially resolved.

After the acute exacerbation subsided, she was noted to have chronic draining fistulas and established

abscesses. She was referred to a plastic surgeon, who surgically resected the involved areas in the

groin and perineum. Advancement skin flaps were used to close the defect primarily, with drains left in

the subcutaneous tissue plane for 5 days. The patient healed uneventfully and returned to work within 2

weeks. At the time this case study was written, the patient had not experienced any additional episodes

of active HS since her surgery.

For more information on HS, see the eMedicine articles 

Hidradenitis Suppurativa

 (in the Dermatology

section), 

Hidradenitis Suppurativa

 (in the General Surgery section), and 

Hidradenitis Suppurativa

 (in the


Emergency Medicine section).

References:

1 American Academy of Family Physicians. Information from your family doctor. Hidradenitis



suppurativa: what you should know. Am Fam Physician. 2005 Oct 15;72(8):1554. [MEDLINE:

16273822]

2 Babcock MD, Grekin RC. Antibiotic use in dermatologic surgery. Dermatol Clin. 2003



Apr;21(2):337-48. [MEDLINE: 12757256]

3 Fite D. Hydradenitis suppurativa. eMedicine Journal [serial online]. Last updated: May 22, 2006.



Available at: 

http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic259.htm

.



4 Jovanovic M, Kihiczak G. Hydradenitis suppurativa. eMedicine Journal [serial online]. Last



updated: Jan 24, 2007. Available at: 

http://www.emedicine.com/derm/topic892.htm

.



5 Kagan RJ, Yakuboff KP, Warner P, Warden GD. Surgical treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa: a



10-year experience. Surgery. 2005 Oct;138(4):734-40; discussion 740-1. [MEDLINE: 16269303]

6 Lebwohl B, Sapadin AN. Infliximab for the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa. J Am Acad



Dermatol. 2003 Nov;49(5 Suppl):S275-6. [MEDLINE: 14576652]

11/29/2007 05:38 PM

eMedicine Case Study

Page 3 of 4

http://master.emedicine.com/email/image/image96/image96answer.html

7 Naveen P, Kiran RP. Hydradenitis suppurativa. eMedicine Journal [serial online]. Last updated:



November 8, 2006. Available at: 

http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic2717.htm

.



8 Shah N. Hidradenitis suppurativa: a treatment challenge. Am Fam Physician. 2005 Oct



15;72(8):1547-52. [MEDLINE: 16273821]

BACKGROUND

A 47-year-old woman presents to her primary care physician with a history of several years of chronic

skin infections and painful, 1-3 mm red pustules in her groin area. Many of the pustules have broken and

are draining a foul-smelling, puslike fluid mixed with what appears to be blood. The patient reports that

these lesions almost always begin as firm bumps that are not painful and then eventually break open.

Additionally, the patient has had episodic abscess formation in the involved area for many years, with

extreme discomfort for at least the past 18 months.

The patient has seen physicians for this problem in the past and has been treated with oral and topical

antibiotics. The nodules seemed to improve when she was taking the antibiotics, but nothing has

stopped the recurrences or cured the condition. Any contact with the affected area increases the irritation

and pain. The patient has felt socially uncomfortable because of the strong, offensive smell, and her

pain has caused her to substantially reduce her activity level.

The patient’s medical history is significant for morbid obesity, which led her to undergo gastric bypass

surgery. The inflammation and pain in her groin worsened after she lost over 100 lb. Now, many of the

eruptions occur in the fold under her pannus. She reports no fever and no exposure to new chemical

agents, detergents, or cleaning agents.

On physical examination, her vital signs are a temperature of 98.6°F (37.0°C), a heart rate of 88 bpm,

and a blood pressure of 132/65 mm Hg. The patient has a nontoxic appearance, and the cardiovascular

examination findings are normal. There is no clinically significant lymphadenopathy, even in the inguinal

area and in the armpits. She has numerous draining lesions in various stages of eruption; those in the

groin and perineal regions are tender to palpation. Evidence of coalescence of some of the lesions and

a spreading redness in the inguinal area are observed.

The patient’s complete blood count (CBC) shows the following values: white blood cell (WBC) count, 8.6 

× 10


9

/L; hemoglobin (Hb), 8 g/L; hematocrit (Hct), 0.259 (25.9%); and platelets, 361 × 10

9

/L.


What is the diagnosis? Why is the patient experiencing what appears to be recurring infections?

CASE DIAGNOSIS

What is the diagnosis?

Click here for the answer

HINT

The nodules are recurrent, are painful,

and are discharging fluid.

Authors:


Anusuya Mokashi, MD, Department of

Medicine Residency, Westchester Medical

Center, New York Medical College, Valhalla,

NY

Jane A. Petro, MD, Chief of Plastic Surgery,



Northern Westchester Hospital, Professor of

Surgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla,

NY

eMedicine Editor:



Rick G. Kulkarni, MD, FACEP, Assistant

Professor, Yale School of Medicine, Section

of Emergency Medicine, Department of

Surgery, Attending Physician, Medical

eMedicine’s Resource Centers offer a wealth of highly-focused

clinical content, CME courses, valuable guidelines, a multimedia

library, and patient education tools. Please take a moment to

visit the following Resource Centers: 






Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə