Probiotics: what is Africa doing? Ivan Muzira Mukisa, PhD



Yüklə 194.84 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix27.11.2016
ölçüsü194.84 Kb.

Probiotics: what is Africa doing?

Ivan Muzira Mukisa, PhD

RUFORUM Seminar Presentation 

at 

Sokoine University of Agriculture



Wednesday 11

Th

May 2016



1. Brief biography

2. The gut microflora

3. The concept of 

probiotics

Definition



Guidelines

4. The probiotics market 

5. Diversity of probiotics

6. Health benefits of 

probiotics



Outline of Presentation

7. Mechanisms of action

8. African based studies on 

probiotics

9. Challenges and 

opportunities for Africa 



10. L. rhamnosus Yoba

– Origins

– Use in products

– Yoba in Uganda



• Born 28 November 1977

• B.Sc Food Sci & Tech, MAK 2003

• M.Sc Food Tech, Katholiek University of Leuven 

and University of Ghent (Belgium), 2007

• PhD, Microbiology, Norwegian University of Life 

Sciences (Norway), 2012   

• Taught at Makerere from 2002 to date

• Technologist in the Fish Industry, Uganda, 2003



Brief Biography

Areas of interest

• Fermentation

• Food safety and quality 

• Functional foods

– Antioxidant enriched products

– Probiotics



Brief Biography

The gut microflora

NB: Only major 

groups shown here 

and mainly faecal 

flora. Up to 1,000 

species reported! 



Sterile GIT

Breastfed infants 

dominated by 

bifidobacteria

While formula fed 

have complex adult 

flora

Flora stabilizes at abt 



2 years and is 

essential for optimal 

gut functioning

Old age

Less bifidobacteria

More anaerobic and 

putrefactive flora

Gut malfunction


The gut microflora

O’Hara and Shanaha. 2006. The gut flora as a forgotten organ. EMB, Vol 7 (7), 688 – 693; Mizutani,(1992) 



• Changing lifestyles make it difficult to maintain a ‘balance’

– Stress


– Changing dietary patterns

– Eating habits 

– Consumption of antibiotics

• Possible shift of ‘balance’!

– Reduction of potentially health‐promoting bacteria (e.g lactobacilli 

and bifidobacteria) 

– Increase in more harmful  flora (e.g clostridia, sulphate‐reducers and 

proteolytic bacteroides)



The gut microflora

A cocktail of the good guys and the bad guys

The gut microflora

The good guys

The bad guys

Produce vitamins

Produce toxins

Ferment food

Produce carcinogens:

Bowel cancer,

Modulate the immune system

Constipation

Enhance digestion and absorptionn

Diarrhea


Inhibit harmful species

Inflamatory bowel diseases

Remove carcinogens (reduce enzymes e.g 

Β‐glucuronidase, azoreductase, 

nitroreductase) and toxins

Putrefaction

Produce short chain fatty acids (SCFAs)

Increased susceptibility to transient 

enteropathogens e.g Salmonela, 

Campylobacter, E. coli...


Elie Metchnikoff

• Earliest mention of the probiotic concept by 

Metchnikoff in 1908

– Complex microflora in the colon affected 

‘autointoxication’ 

– Longevity of Bulgarian peasants due to consumption 

of large quantities of yoghurt

– The live microbes were believed to promote good 

health

– Origins of the Bacillus bulgaricus (L. delbrueckii subsp. 



bulgaricus), which together with Streptococcus 

salivarius subsp. thermophilus form the yoghurt 

starter


The concept of probiotics: origins

”Inflammation as understood in man and higher anmials is a penomenon that almost always results from the intervention of 

some pathogenic microbe”, E. Metchnikoff.


• Several have been proposed over time:

– Substances secreted by one microorganism that stimulate the 

growth of another (Lilly and Stillwell, 1965)

– Organisms and substances that influence intestinal microbial 

balance (Parker, 1974)

– A live microbial feed supplement which beneficially affects the host 

animal by improving its intestinal microbial balance (Fuller, 1989)

– A live microbial feed supplement that is beneficial to health 

(Salminen et al., 1998). 

• Currently acceptable definition: 

– Live microorganisms which when administered in adequate 

amounts confer a health benefit on the host 

(FAO/WHO, 2002)



The concept of probiotics: Definition

• Probiotic ingestion can be recommended as a preventative 

approach


– To help main the balance of the intestinal microflora thus enhancing ‘well‐being’.

– Prevent or alleviate some conditions

• Some studies have shown that effects can be due to:

– dead bacteria i.e paraprobiotics (Taverniti and Guglielmetti, 2011)

– bacterial products (postbiotics; Tsilingiri and Rescigno, 2013)

• However,  the definition still emphasizes live microrganisms



The concept of probiotics: Definition

Guidelines for Probiotics*

• FAO/WHO in 2001: need for clear guidelines for 

systematic evaluation of probiotics and their 

related health claims 

• Functional foods

The concept of probiotics: guidelines

*

Joint FAO/WHO Working Group Report on Drafting Guidelines for the Evaluation of Probiotics in Food. London, Ontario, 

Canada, April 30 and May 1, 2002


Strain identification 

Phenotypic and genotypic methods.

Genus, species and strain

Deposit strain in International Culture 

Collection

Functional 

characterization

In vitro tests

Animal studies

Safety assessment

In vitro and/or animal

Phase 1 human study 

Double blind randomized placebo‐

controlled (DBPC) phase 2: 

human trial or 

other appropriate design with sample size and 

primary outcome appropriate to determine if 

strain/product is efficacious 

Preferably second 

independent DBPC 

to 


comfirm results

Phase 3. E

ffectiveness trial is 

appropriate to compare 

probiotics with standard 

treatment of a specific condition

Labeling.

Contents: genus, species, strain

Minimum number of viable bacteria at end of the shelf life

Proper storage conditions

Health claims

Corporate contact details for consumer information



Probiotic  

Guidelines for evaluation of probiotics for food use. (FAO/WHO, 2002)

Probiotic effects are 

generally strain specific. Save 

for example S.thermophillus 

and L.delbruecki ssp. 



Bulgaricus which enhance 

lactose digestion

Main in vitro tests for study of probiotic strains

• Resistance to gastric acidity

• Bile acid resistance

• Adherence to mucus and/or human epithelial cells and cell lines

• Antimicrobial activity against potentially pathogenic bacteria

• Ability to reduce pathogen adhesion to surfaces

• Bile salt hydrolase activity

• Resistance to spermicides (applicable to probiotics for vaginal use)



*

Joint FAO/WHO Working Group Report on Drafting Guidelines for the Evaluation of Probiotics in Food. London, Ontario, 

Canada, April 30 and May 1, 2002

The concept of probiotics: guidelines


Safety considerations of probiotic strains

• Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria associated with food are 

historically considered to be safe.  GRAS status

• Probiotics may however, be theoretically responsible for four 

kinds of side effects:

– Systemic infections: few reported in patients with underlying medical 

conditions

– Deleterious metabolic activities

– Excessive immune stimulation in susceptible individuals

– Gene transfer



*

Joint FAO/WHO Working Group Report on Drafting Guidelines for the Evaluation of Probiotics in Food. London, Ontario, 

Canada, April 30 and May 1, 2002

The concept of probiotics: guidelines


Safety considerations of probiotic strains

• Determination of antibiotic resistance patterns

• Assessment of certain metabolic activities (e.g D‐lactate production, 

bile salts deconjugation...)

• Assessment of side effects during human studies

• Testing for toxin production if strain belongs to a species that is a 

known mammalian toxin producer  

• Determining hemolytic actvity if strain belongs to a species with 

known hemolytic potential

• Lack of infectivity in immunocompromized animals



*

Joint FAO/WHO Working Group Report on Drafting Guidelines for the Evaluation of Probiotics in Food. London, Ontario, 

Canada, April 30 and May 1, 2002

The concept of probiotics: guidelines


The pyramid of evidence

The concept of probiotics: evidence

Meta‐analysis  RCTs

Randomised control trials

Open studies in humans

Animal studies

In vitro studies

Incr

easing 

evidence

Marteau, 2003



Health claims related probiotic strains

• General health claims allowed in most countries for probiotic containg foods. 

For example, ’Improves gut health’

• Specific health claims, e.g ’reduces the incidence and severity of rotavirus 

diarrhea in infants’ can be used where sufficient scientific evidence exists, 

(FAO/WHO, 2002)

• Manufacturer responsible for getting independent third party review by 

experts to establish if the claim is truthful and not misleading



The concept of probiotics: claims

Market

• Major product categories



The probiotics market

Foods and beverages: 

dairy, fermented meat, bakery, 

breakfast cereals, beverages, meat, fish 

& eggs and soy products



Dietary supplements

tablets, capsules, and powders



Animal feed 

• Global probiotics market valued at USD 32.06 billion in 2013 

(Grand View Research, 2016). 

• Estimated to be valued at USD 33.19 billion in 2015

• Projected to reach USD 46.55 billion by 2020.   

– For comparison: The global value of the Coca‐Cola brand rose 

from USD 41.41 billion in 2006 to USD 83.84 in 2015 

• Industry growth likely due to:

– Increasing global health awareness among consumers  

– Growth of global functional food industry

– Technological advancements  

– Rising disposable incomes

The probiotics market


• Food and beverage applications to increase by 50% in N. 

America


Projected growth in probiotics in North America probiotics market revenue, by application, 2012 – 2020 (USD 

Million). (Grand View Research, 2016). 



The probiotics market

• As of 2014 more than 100 companies were involved in marketing 

probiotic products in the US!

• Some of the key players in the international market

1.

American Biologics, USA



2.

Arla Foods, USA

3.

BioGaia Biologics AB, Sweden



4.

Chr. Hansen A/S, Denmark

5.

ConAgra, USA



6.

DuPont Danisco, Denmark

7.

General Mills Inc., USA



8.

Groupe Dannon, France

9.

Institute Rosell, Canada



10. Nestle SA, Switzerland 

11. Valio Ltd, Finland

12. Yakult Honsha Co. Ltd., Japan

13. BioGaia AB, Sweden 

– ...

The probiotics market


• Limited information available on market share of probiotics in 

Africa


– Africa’s market share likely very small in global terms

• South Africa has a relatively well established market:

– Supplements (capsules)

– Fortified food items (especially baby cereals)

– Fermented dairy products  

• Likely need or interest partly based on traditional fermented 

foods 

– Fermented foods considered to have health benefits



– Some believed to aid in the control of some diseases (intestinal 

disorders)



The probiotics market

Both bacteria and yeasts



Bifidobacterium

– breve

– lactis Bb12

– longum BB536



Enterococcus faecium SF68



Escherichia coli Nissle 1917



Bacillus cereus, Bacillus 



subtilis



Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 



boulardii



Lactobacillus

– johnsonii LA1

– acidophilus LA5

– acidophilus NCFB 1748

– rhamnosus “GG”

– casei “Shirota”

– casei “Imunitass”®

– casei Defensis

– gasseri

– reuteri

– salivarius UCC118

– plantarum 299v

Diversity of probiotics


Mainly isolated from 

– Food


– Intestinal contents/stools of humans or animals

– The human urinogenital tract

– Oral cavity

– Human milk



Diversity of probiotics

Probiotic vehicles

• Several foods considered as vehicles for 

probiotic delivery:

– Dairy products

– Fermented or brined meat 

– Fermented vegetables, cereals

– Fruit juice

– Nutritional supplements (liquid, powder or tablets)

• The products are considered as functional foods

Diversity of probiotics


Some probiotic products on the African market

Product name

ProbiFlora Adult 

Intensive Rescue

Company


Danisco

Market


South Africa

Probiotic

9 strains

Claimed


Benefits

against


Lactose intolerance

Product name

ProbiFlora



Infant 

Company


Danisco

Market


South Africa

Probiotic

Not specified

Claimed 


Benefits

against


Colic

Product name

ProbiFlora



Adult 

Classic Bowel Support 

Company


Danisco

Market


South Africa

Probiotic

4 strains

Claimed 


Benefits 

against


Bloating

Diversity of probiotics

Some probiotic products on the African market

Product name

ProbiFlora



Junior 

Company


Danisco

Market


South Africa

Probiotic

3 strains

Claimed


Benefits

against


Lactose intolerance

Low immunity

Food allergies

Product name

ProbiFlora



Adult 

Colon Ease 

Company


Danisco

Market


South Africa

Probiotic

Not specified

Claimed 


Benefits

Enhances digestion

And regularity

Product name

Forever Active 

Probiotic

Company


Forever Living Products 

Market


Kenya

Probiotic

6 strains (B. lactis, L. 

rhamnosus; acidophilus, 

B. longum; L.bulgaricus, 

L.plantarum)

Claimed 


Benefits

Healthy digestive 

system, enhanced 

nutrient absorption 

and immune function

Diversity of probiotics

Some probiotic products on the African market

Product name

BioPro

Company


Wellington 

Pharmaceuticals, USA

Market

South Africa



Probiotic

L. reuteri

Claimed


Benefits

against


Colic

Product name

Combiforte

Company


Combiforte BV,

Netherlands

Market

South Africa



Probiotic

L. acidophilus

B. bifidus, B. longum

Claimed 


Benefits against

Antibiotic induced 

diarrhoea and other 

intestinal disorders 

Product name

Culturelle

Company


Culturelle, UK

Market


South Africa

Probiotic



B. longum,

L. acidophilus, L. 

rhamnosus GG

S. thermophilus

Claimed 


Benefits 

against


Diarrhoea, bloating,

Immune boosting

Diversity of probiotics

Some probiotic products on the African market

Product name

BioPro

Company


Bioflora CC 

Market


South Africa

Probiotic



B. infantis

Claimed


Benefits

against


Diarrhoea, 

disturbances which are 

associated with 

antibiotic therapy, oral 

thrush, food allergies, 

lactose intolerance and 

nappy rash

Product name

Vagiforte Plus

Company


Bioflora CC 

Market


South Africa

Probiotic



lactobacillus

Bifidobacteria

Claimed 


Benefits against

Vaginal thrush

Product name

Lacteol Fort

Company


Rameda, Egypt

Market


South Africa

Probiotic



L. fermentum

L. delbrueckii

Claimed 


Benefits 

against


Bacterial or viral 

diarrhoea

Diversity of probiotics

Some probiotic products on the African market

Product name

Trilac

Company


Allergon AB, Sweden

Market


Kenya

Probiotic



L. acidophilus, L. 

bulgarius and 

B.animalis

Claimed


Benefits

against


Diarrhea, constipation

Product name

Seeking Health

Company


Seeking HealthUSA

Market


Kenya

Probiotic



S. boulardii

Claimed 


Benefits against

Diarrhea, gut 

inflamation

Product name

Kalsis

Company


Catalysis Lab., Spain

Market


Kenya

Probiotic



L. acidophilus

Claimed 


Benefits

Fixing of calcium

Diversity of probiotics

Several benefits associated with probiotics

Health Benefits of probiotics

Condition

Probiotic

Results

Hypercholesterolemia



B. lactis Bb12

B. Longum BL1, 

L. acidophilus L1,

L. acidophilus La5

L. reuteri NCIMB 30242

Lower


total cholesterol and 

LDL cholesterol

in probiotic vs.

Lowers total 

cholesterol, 

LDLcholesterol,

and non‐

HDLcholesterol

Constipation

L. casei rhamnosus Lcr35

L. casei Shirota

Higher defecation 

frequency, less hard 

stool. Decreased 

severity of

constipation and 

improved

stool consistency  

Sources: Taibi and Comelli (2014).


Several benefits associated with probiotics

Health Benefits of probiotics

Condition

Probiotic

Results

Infectious diarrhea

(prevention)

L. rhamnosus GG

S. boulardii lyo

B. lactis Bb12

Atopic eczema associated

with cow’s milk

allergy


B. lactis NCC2818 A

L. rhamnosus GG

Immune response



B. lactis DN‐173 010 

L. acidophilus LAFT1  

L. rhamnosus GG

Antibody response to

vaccination

L. casei DN‐114 001

Increased antibody 

response

to influenza 

vaccination in

the probiotic group

Sources: Taibi and Comelli (2014).


Several benefits associated with probiotics

Health Benefits of probiotics

Condition

Probiotic

Results

Respiratory infection



L. casei DN‐114 001

L. rhamnosus GG

L. plantarum DSM 15312

(HEAL 9) and L.



paracasei DSM 13434

(8700:2)


Decreased duration of

Infection

Reduced risk of upper

RTIs and duration of  

Symptom

Reduced incidence and



duration of common cold 

Infantile colic



L. reuteri DSM 17938

Bacterial vaginosis



L. rhamnosus GR‐1 

L. fermentum RC‐14

Reduced colonization of

vagina by potential

pathogens

Urinary tract infections

L. crispatus CTV‐05

Reduction in recurrent UTIs in 

women

Oral health



Streptococcus salivarius K12

Reduction of malodour,  

prevention of pharyngeal 

infections

Sources: Taibi and Comelli (2014).


Several benefits associated with probiotics

Health Benefits of probiotics

Condition

Probiotic

Results

Antibiotic‐associated

diarrhea

Bacillus clausii strains

O/C, NR, SIN, and T



B. animalis Bb12 and

Sreptococcus

Thermophilus

Enterococcus faecium LAB

SF68


L. acidophilus CL1285

and L. casei LBC80 R



L. casei DN‐114 001

L. rhamnosus E/N

L. rhamnosus GG

S. boulardii lyo

Infectious diarrhea

(treatment)

Enterococcus faecium LAB SF68

L. reuteri SD2112 A, L. rhamnosus GG

S. boulardii lyo, E. coli Nissle 1917 (EcN)

Reduced 


duration

Sources: Taibi and Comelli (2014).



Several benefits associated with probiotics

Health Benefits of probiotics

Condition

Probiotic

Results

Clostridium difficile

associated

diarrhea

L. acidophilus CL1285

and L. casei LBC80 R



L. casei DN‐114 001

L rhamnosus GG

S. boulardii lyo

Clostridium difficile with 

no

diarrhea



L. rhamnosus HN001  

L. acidophilus NCFM

Bacterial vaginosis and

vulvovaginal

candidiasis



L. casei rhamnosus Lcr35

L. rhamnosus GR‐1

L. fermentum RC‐14

Enhanced restoration of the

vaginal microbiota after

antibiotic treatment of

bacterial vaginosis

Sources: Taibi and Comelli (2014).



Several benefits associated with probiotics

Health Benefits of probiotics

Condition

Probiotic

Results

Helicobacter pylori

Bacillus clausii strains

O/C, NR, SIN, and T

1b(t)

L. casei DN‐114 001

L. reuteri ATCC 55730

L. rhamnosus GG

S. boulardii lyo

L. johnsonii La1

Irritable bowel

syndromme

Bacillus coagulans GBI 30

B. bifidum BB75, B. infantis 35624

B. lactis DN‐173 010, B. longum 101,

L. acidophilus 102, Lactococcus lactis 

103, Streptococcus thermophilus 104

L. plantarum 299 V, L. reuteri SD2112

L. rhamnosus GG

Sources: Taibi and Comelli (2014).



Adequate probiotic intake?

• Still controversial/varrying opinions

• Can be expressed as cells per gram product or cells per serving

• Studies have used doses of 10

6

– 10


9

cells per day for 1 – 13 weeks 

• A daily dose of 1–5 × 10

9

cfu for a minimum of 5 days is currently 



recommended*

– About 10 ml of product with 10

8

cells per ml



– About 100 ml of of product with 10

7

cells per ml



– About 1 L of product with 10

6

cells per ml



– About 10 L of product with 10

5

cells per ml

Health Benefits of probiotics

* Kaur et al. (2002); Health Canada (2009)

Cut off for 

probiotics 

shelf life


Adequate probiotic intake?

Health Benefits of probiotics

Log 8

100,000 to 10 million cells 

per gram at start 

fermentation

100 million cells per gram

at end fermentation



Log 5 ‐ 7

Log 10 per serving



20 billion cells 

per serving



Probiotic

Starter culture

Assuming a serving of 

200 ml of yoghurt


The fate of ingested probiotics

Health Benefits of probiotics

Administration 

needs to be 

continued

Mechanisms of action of probiotics

Suppression of 

endogenous 

pathogens

Control of Irritable 

Bowel Syndromme 

(IBS)

Control of 



Inflamatory 

Bowel Disease

Alleviate food 

allergy symptoms 

in infants

Suppression of 

exogenous 

pathogens e.g 

travellors’ 

diarrhea


Normalised intestinal 

microbial composition

Strenthened 

innate immunity

Colonization resistance: pH, 

mucus, bacteriocins, defensins, 

enhanced cell binding

Balanced immune 

response

Immunomodulation: 

effects on lymphocytes e.g 

cytokine production, 

stoping proinflamatory 

responses, preventing 

apoptosis, icreased Ig 

release...

PROBIOTICS

Metabolic effects

Reduced risk of 

colon cancer

Lowered 

serum 


cholesterol

Bile salt 

deconjugation and 

excretion

Lactose hydrolysis

Improved 

lactose 

tolerance



Lower levels of 

toxigenic/mutagenic 

reactions in the gut

Supply of SCF’s and 

vitamins (e.g folate) to 

the colonic epithelium

Maitai, C. K., & Kokonya, D. M. (2008). A Brief Review of Probiotic Use. East and Central African Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences11(3).



Some studies on probiotics in Africa

Source: Franz, C. M., Huch, M., Mathara, J. M., Abriouel, H., Benomar, N., Reid, G., ... & Holzapfel, W. H. (2014). African fermented foods and probiotics. 

International journal of food microbiology190, 84‐96.Global Probiotics Market Outlook (2014‐2022) .

• Mainly in vitro studies focussed on functional 

and technological properties

• A few human studies



Some studies on probiotics in Africa

Source: Franz, C. M., Huch, M., Mathara, J. M., Abriouel, H., Benomar, N., Reid, G., ... & Holzapfel, W. H. (2014). 

Strains

Source

Inoculated/consu

med product

Region were product 

is consumed

E. faecium

Raw cow milk for nono 

production

In vitro study

Nigeria


L. plantarum, L. fermentum

Fremented maize dough, 

cassava, Gari

In vitro study

Ghana


L. plantarum, Pediococcus spp

Fufu and Ogi

In vitro study

Nigeria


Pediococcus spp, Lactobacillus spp, 

L. fermentum

Pearl millet slurry



In vitro study

Burkina Faso, Ghana



L. Fermentum

Kimere: pearl millet 

dough


In vitro study

Kenya


L. Johnsonii (BFE 6128, BFE 6154)

L. plantarum (BFE 5092, BFE 5759, BFE 

5878), L. acidophilus, L. paracasei, L. 



rhamnosus. L. fermentum

Kule naato (Maasai 

fermented milk)



Kwerionik (fermented 

milk)


In vitro study

Kenya


Uganda

L. acidophilus, L. pentosus

Fermented cow’s milk and 

cassava

Fermented cereal 



maize gruel

West Africa

LAB, mainly W. confusa and L. 

fermentum

Koko and koko sour water 

from millet porridge



Koko sour water

Ghana


L. rhamnosus GR‐1

Milk yoghurt and 

milk yoghut with 

Moringa powder

Tanzania


• High costs of randomized control trials

– Lack of government investment in R & D

– Lack of industrial and philanthropic funding

• High costs of developing and storing of cultures

• Getting the consumer to accept probiotics

– The fear of eating microbes 

• Legislation

– Non existent in a number of countries



Major challenges in Africa

• Increasing interest in natural, non‐drug related remedies

• Limited knowledgeable about probiotics

– About 95% of medical practitioners in Nigeria not familiar with 

probiotics yet 64% if favour of their use (Anakum, 2006)

• Populations exposed to:

– Poor hygiene conditions

– Toxic compounds (aflatoxins)

– Malnutrition (e.g vitamin deficiency, iron deficiency)

– Chronic enteric infections (e.g diarrhea which accounts for 37% of 

childhood deaths in Sub‐Saharan Africa)

– Increasing NCDs

Opportunities for Africa


• Unavailability of locally sourced strains with documented 

health benefits

• A great diversity of traditional fermented foods 

– Potential sources of probiotics

– Potentially acceptable probiotic vehicles

• Exisistence of several well document probiotic strains from 

the developed countries

– No need for expensive trials 

– Could be evaluated for use in local foods

Opportunities for Africa


• A 

generic

strain of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

• LGG isolated in 1983 from the intestinal tract of a 

healthy human being 

• Patent filed by Sherwood Gorbach and Barry Gordin

on 17


th

April 1985

– Strain initially identified as Lb. acidophilus GG  (ATCC 

Accession No. 53103)

• Patent of LGG expired in 2006

Lb. rhamnosus Yoba


• Concept of ’generic probiotics’ introduced by Kort and 

Sybesma (2012).

– Patent‐expired probiotics are free to be used by others

• Remco Kort and Wilbert Sybesma (Yoba For Life 

Foundation)  isolated LGG from a probiotic product

• Clone of LGG named L.rhamnosus Yoba

– Deposited in the BCCM/LMG labs in Belgium

– Identity and genome sequence evaluated

• Yoba for Life Foundation introduced L. rhamnosus Yoba in 

Uganda in 2013 

– First introduced in a small dairy plant in Mukono district

– Mainly used in yoghurt production



Lb. rhamnosus Yoba

Other African products in which Lb. rhamnosus Yoba has been 

tried

Lb. rhamnosus Yoba

Product

Description

Country

Reference

Mutandabota

Milk + baobab fruit pulp  

Zimbabwe


Mpofu et al., (2014)

Zoom‐kom


Wheat, milk and water

Burkina Faso

Kort et al., (2015)

Uji


Fermented 

maize/sorghum beverage

Kenya

Kort et al., (2015)



Obushera

Fermented 

sorghum/millet beverage

Uganda


Kort et al (2015)

Meeme and Mukisa 

(unpublished)

Soy yoghurt

Fermented soy milk

Uganda


Lutalo, Nanyonga and 

Mukisa (unpublished)

Fermented vegetable

salads


Mixed vegetables

Uganda


Kakeeto, Bion and 

Mukisa (unpublished)

Fruit juice cocktail

Mixed fruits

Uganda

Agaba and Mukisa 



(unpublished)

• First prototype of 

non‐dairy based 

probiotic in Uganda 

produced at MAK in 

May 2016 

• Obushera 

fermented using the 

L. rhamnosus Yoba 

starter

– Acceptable

– Probiotic viable for 

at least 8 weeks 

during cold storage 

(about log 8 cfu/ml)



Lb. rhamnosus Yoba in Obushera  

• The Food Technology Business Incubation Center, 

Makerere


• Yoba for Life Foundation

• RUFORUM

• iAGRI

• SUA


Acknowledgement

Thank You

Anukam, K. C., Osazuwa, E.O., and Reid, G. (2006). Knowledge of probiotics by Nigerian clinicians. International 



Journal of Probiotics and Prebiotics1(1), 57‐62. 

Elliott, E and Teversham, K. 2004. An evaluation of nine probiotics available in South Africa, August 2003. Vol. 



94, No. 2 SAMJ.

Fooks L. J.  and Gibson G. R. 2002. Probiotics as modulators of the gut flora. British Journal of Nutrition, 88, 



Suppl. 1, S39–S49.

Franz, C. M., Huch, M., Mathara, J. M., Abriouel, H., Benomar, N., Reid, G., ... & Holzapfel, W. H. (2014). African 



fermented foods and probiotics. International journal of food microbiology190, 84‐96.Global Probiotics 

Market Outlook (2014‐2022) . 

http://www.strategymrc.com/report/global‐probiotics‐market‐outlook‐2014‐

2022


Grand View Research. 2016. Probiotics Market Analysis By Application (Probiotic Functional Foods & 

Beverages, Probiotic Dietary Supplements, Animal Feed Probiotics), By End‐Use (Human Probiotics, Animal 

Probiotics) And Segment Forecasts To 2020. 

http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry‐analysis/probiotics‐

market


Health Canada. 2009. Guidance Document. The Use of Probiotic Microorganisms in Food. Available from 

http://www.hc‐sc.gc.ca/fn‐an/legislation/guide‐ld/probiotics_guidance‐orientation_probiotiques‐eng.php. 

[Accessed 12 February 2014.]

Joint FAO/WHO Working Group Report on Drafting Guidelines for the Evaluation of Probiotics in Food. London, 



Ontario, Canada, April 30 and May 1, 2002.

Kaur, I.P., Chopra, K., and Saini, A. 2002. Probiotics: potential pharmaceutical applications. Eur. J. Pharm. Sci. 



15(1): 1–9. doi:10.1016/S0928‐0987(01)00209‐3. PMID:11803126.

Kort, R. and Sybesma, W. (2012) Probiotics for every body. Trends Biotechnol. 30, 613–615 



References

Kort, R., Westerik, N., Serrano, L.M., Douillard, F., Gottstein, W., Ananta, E., Mukisa, I.M., Tuijn, C., Basten, L., 

Hafkamp, B., Meijer, W., Teusink, B., de Vos, W., & Sybesma, W. (2015). A novel consortium of Lactobacillus 

rhamnosus GG and Streptococcus thermophilus C106 for access to functional fermented foods. Microbial Cell 

Factories. 14: 195 –

Lei, V. et al. (2006) Spontaneously fermented millet product as a natural probiotic treatment for diarrhoea in 



young children: an intervention study in Northern Ghana. Int. J. Food Microbiol. 110, 246–253  

Maitai, C. K., & Kokonya, D. M. (2008). A Brief Review of Probiotic Use. East and Central African Journal of 



Pharmaceutical Sciences11(3).

Markets and Markets.com. 2015. Probiotic Ingredients Market by Function (Regular, Preventative, Therapy), 



Application (Food & Beverage, Dietary Supplements, & Animal Feed), End Use (Human & Animal Probiotics), 

Ingredient (Bacteria & Yeast), and by Region ‐ Global Trends & Forecast to 2020. 

http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market‐Reports/probiotic‐market‐advanced‐technologies‐and‐global‐

market‐69.html

Mathara, M.J., Schillinger, U., Kutima, P.M., Mbugua, K.S., Guigas, C., Franz, C.M.A.P., Holzapfel, W.H., 2008a. 



Functional Properties of Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from Maasai traditional fermented milk 

products in Kenya. Curr. Microbiol. 56, 315–321.

Mathara, M.J., Schillinger, U., Guigas, C., Franz, C.M.A.P., Kutima, P.M., Mbugua, S., Shin, H. K., Holzapfel, W.H., 



2008b. Functional characteristics of Lactobacillus spp. from traditional Maasai fermented milk products in 

Kenya. Int. J. Food Microbiol. 126, 57–64.

Mpofu A, Linnemann AR, Sybesma W, Kort R, Nout MJ, Smid EJ. (2014). Development of a locally sustainable 



functional food based on mutandabota, a traditional food in southern Africa. Journal of Dairy Science

97(5):2591‐2599.



References

Ng, S. C., Hart, A. L., Kamm, M. A., Stagg, A. J., & Knight, S. C. (2009). Mechanisms of action of probiotics: 

recent advances. Inflammatory bowel diseases15(2), 300‐310.

O’Hara and Shanaha. 2006. The gut flora as a forgotten organ. EMB, Vol 7 (7), 688 ‐ 693 



Patrignani, F., Lanciotti, R., Mathara, J.M., Guerzoni, M.E., Holzapfel, W.H., 2006. Potential of functional strains 

isolated from traditional Maasai milk as starters for the production of fermented milks. Int. J. Food Microbiol. 

107, 1–11.

Reid, G. 2016. Probiotics: definition, scope and mechanisms of action. Best Practice & Research Clinical 



Gastroenterology 30: 17‐25

SCAN. (2000). Report of the Scientific Committee of Animal Nutrition on the Safety of use of Bacillus Species in 



Animal Nutrition. European Commission of Health and Consumer Protection, Directorate‐General. 

http://europa.eu.int/comm/food/fs/sc/scan/out41.pdf

Sybesma, W., Kort, R., and Lee, Y. 2015. Locally sourced probiotics, the next opportunity for developing 



countries? Trends in Biotechnology, Vol. 33 (4): 197 – 200.   

Taibi, A and Comelli, E.M. 2014. Practical approaches to probiotics use. Appl. Physiol. Nutr. Metab. 39: 980–



986.

Taverniti, V., and Guglielmetti, S. 2011. The immunomodulatory properties of probiotic microorganisms 



beyond their viability (ghost probiotics: proposal of paraprobiotic concept). Genes Nutr. 6(3): 261–274. 

doi:10.1007/s12263‐011‐0218‐x. PMID:21499799. Technavio. 2016. Global Probiotics Market 2015‐2019. 

http://www.technavio.com/report/probiotics‐market

Tsilingiri, K., and Rescigno, M. 2013. Postbiotics: what else? Benef. Microbes, 4(1): 101–107. 



doi:10.3920/BM2012.0046. PMID:23271068.

Viana, JV, da Cruz, A.g,  Zoellner, SS., Silva, R., Batista ALD. 2008. Probiotic foods: consumer perception and 



attitudes. International Journal of Food Science and Technology, 43, 1577–1580



Yoba News. 2014. 



References


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə