Batenburg Industriële Elektronica Wheedwarsweg 7



Yüklə 251,22 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix04.05.2017
ölçüsü251,22 Kb.
  1   2   3

 

Batenburg Industriële Elektronica 

Wheedwarsweg 7 

7471 GG, Goor 

www.batenburg-elektronica.nl 

     

 

Date 18-11-2015 

 

Koen Brinkerink 



S1068830  

University of Twente 

Master Business Administration 

Track: Service Management 

k.brinkerink@student.utwente.nl 

 

 



Performance measurement in SMEs 

 

 



 

 

Public English version 



Performance measurement in SMEs 

 

 



 

   


   

 

       07-12-15 



Koen Brinkerink  

ii 




There is nothing so useless as doing efficiently that which 

should not be done at all.

” - Peter Drucker (1909-2005)  



Performance measurement in SMEs 

 

 



 

   


   

 

       07-12-15 



Koen Brinkerink  

iii 


Title  

Performance measurement for SMEs:       

Student 

Koen Brinkerink 

Student number 

S1068830 

Programme 

Business Administration 

Track 

Service Management 



Faculty 

Behavioural, Management and Social Sciences 

University 

Universiteit van Twente 

Organization 

Batenburg Industriële Elektronica 

1

st

 University supervisor  



Ir. H. Kroon 

2

nd 



University supervisor 

Prof. Dr. C.P.M. Wilderom 

1

st

 organization supervisor   Ing. Alphons Engbersen 



2

nd 


organization supervisor  Arnold Scheringa BSc  

Place 


Goor 

Date 


18-11-2015 

 

This document is a redacted version of the original Dutch version ‘Prestatiemeting in het MKB: Een 



onderzoek  naar  de  ontwikkeling  van  een  prestatiemeetsysteem  voor  Batenburg  Industriële 

Elektronica
’. For more information contact the author.  

Performance measurement in SMEs 

 

 



 

   


   

 

       07-12-15 



Koen Brinkerink  

iv 


Content

  

1

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 2



1.1

Research assignment ............................................................................................................... 2

1.2

Research questions .................................................................................................................. 2



1.3

Research objective ................................................................................................................... 2

2

Literature ......................................................................................................................................... 3



2.1

Definition of a performance measurement system .................................................................. 3

2.2

Characteristics of  performance measurement systems ......................................................... 3



2.2.2

Roles of performance measurement systems ................................................................... 3

2.2.3

Processes of performance measurement systems ........................................................... 3



2.3

Performance measurement models ......................................................................................... 3

2.3.1

Balanced Scorecard .......................................................................................................... 4



2.4

Developing performance measurement systems ..................................................................... 4

2.4.1

Designing & implementing performance measurement systems ...................................... 5



2.4.2

Design- & implementation methodologies ........................................................................ 5

2.5

Performance measurement systems for SMEs ........................................................................ 6



2.5.1

Designing and implementing a performance measurement system for SMEs ................. 7

2.5.2

Design and implementation methodologies for SMEs ...................................................... 8



2.5.3

Preconditions for effective developmental process for SMEs .......................................... 9

2.5.4

Strategic alignment ........................................................................................................... 9



2.5.5

Critical success factors ................................................................................................... 10

3

Method .......................................................................................................................................... 11



3.1

Data collection ........................................................................................................................ 11

3.2

Data analysis .......................................................................................................................... 11



3.2.1

Developing activity statements ....................................................................................... 12

3.2.2

Developing affinity groups and supporting theme’s ....................................................... 12



3.2.3

Developing critical success factors ................................................................................. 12

3.3

Validity & generalizability ........................................................................................................ 12



3.4

Ethics ...................................................................................................................................... 12

3.5

Data analysis process ............................................................................................................ 12



4

Results .......................................................................................................................................... 12

4.1

Overview of critical success factors ....................................................................................... 13



5

Advice ........................................................................................................................................... 13

6

Limitations ..................................................................................................................................... 13



6.1

Future research ...................................................................................................................... 13

7

References .................................................................................................................................... 14



 

Tables and figures 

Table 1. Develop steps of a performance measurement system (Wisner & Fawcett in Neely et al., 

2005) ............................................................................................................................................... 6

Table 2. Appliance of validation strategies (Creswell, 2009) in this study ........................................... 12

 

Figure 1. The Balanced Scorecard (Kaplan & Norton, 1996) ................................................................. 4



Figure 2. Top-down approach of Kaplan & Norton (Biazzo & Garengo, 2012a) .................................... 5

Figure 3. A circular approach to the implementation of the BSC (Biazzo & Garengo, 2012a) .............. 8

Figure 4. Strategic alignment (Bauer, 2004) .......................................................................................... 9



Performance measurement in SMEs 

 

 



 

   


   

 

       07-12-15 



Koen Brinkerink  



1  Introduction 

Batenburg Industriële  Elektronica  (BIE)  wants  to  gain  insight  into  their performances. They want  to 

develop  a  performance  measurement  system  (PMS)  by  which  they  should  be  able  to  focus  on  all 

their  essential  performance  dimensions  (e.g.  Bititci,  Garengo,  Ates  &  Nudurupati,  2015;  Taylor  & 

Taylor, 2014).  

 

A performance measurement system contains a set of critical and balanced performance indicators 



(Kaplan  &  Norton,  1996;  Taticchi,  Tonelli  &  Cagnazzo,  2010)  that  provide  insight  into  the  level  of  

organisational  success  in  achieving  their  mission,  vision  and  strategy  (Garengo,  Biazzo  &  Bititci, 

2005; Kaplan & Norton, 1992, 1996; Neely, Mills, Platts & Richards, 2002; Taticchi, Balachandran & 

Tonelli,  2012).  By  deploying  a  performance  measurement  system  strategic  alignment  can  be 

achieved (e.g. Bititci et al., 2015; Franco-Santos, Lucianetti & Bourne, 2012; Kaplan & Norton, 1996; 

Pun & White, 2005). Strategic alignment is linking operational activities to organizational strategy and 

objectives (Johnston & Pongatichat, 2008; Kaplan & Norton, 1996; Pun & White, 2005). With a PMS 

the  mission,  vision  and  strategy  of  an  organization  can  be  translated  into  critical  success  factors 

(CSFs), (critical) performance measures, goals and targets (e.g. de Waal & Kourtit, 2013; Doeleman, 

Thomassen & van Winzum, 2013; Gomes, Yasin & Lisboa, 2011; Lohman, Fortuin & Wouters, 2004; 

Mettänen, 2005; Neely et al., 2002; Wouters & Sportel, 2005). 

 

BIE has to take a number of steps before they will be able to develop a performance measurement 



system. Obstacles the organisation encounters concerning developing such a system are inherent to 

the characteristics of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) (Cocca & Alberti, 2010; Garengo et 

al.,  2005;  Hudson,  Smart  &  Bourne,  2001;  Sousa  &  Aspinwall,  2010).  One  of  the  requirements  is 

using  the  organizational  strategy  or  conducting  a  stakeholder  analysis  as  a  basis  (i.e.  Kaplan  & 

Norton, 1996; Neely et al., 2002; Yadav & Sagar, 2013). Other obstacles they might encounter when 

developing  a  PMS  are:  lacking  human  resources;  lacking  managerial  capacity;  lacking  financial 

resources;  reactive  approach  to  managing;  having  tacit  knowledge  and  little  need  to  formalise 

processes;  and  having  misconceptions  about  performance  measurement  (Garengo  et  al.,  2005). 

Therefore,  effective  designing  and  implementing  a  PMS  requires  a    thoroughly  designed  approach 

(Fernandes,  Raja  &  Whalley,  2006;  Hudson  et  al.,  2001;  Taticchi,  Balachandran,  Botarelli  & 

Cagnazzo,  2008),  in  which  preconditions  are  taken  into  consideration  (Brem,  Kreusel  &  Neusser, 

2008; Garengo et al., 2005; Taylor & Taylor, 2014). 

 

1.1  Research assignment  

In this study the first steps into designing and implementing a PMS are taken. This has been fulfilled 

by means of identifying preconditions and requirements of a PMS as well as identifying the CSFs of 

BIE. The mission, vision, and strategy of BIE is developed and adjusted by the management team in 

agreement with the Batenburg Holding. The CSFs (Bullen & Rockart, 1981; Caralli, Stevens, Willke & 

Wilson,  2004;  Rockart,  1978)  of  the  organization  have  not  been  distinguished.  Therefore,  I  am 

focussing on identifying the CSFs of the organization. This study has to support the development of 

a PMS and result in an advice on further formalisation of Batenburg Industriële Elektronica. 

 

1.2  Research questions  

Following  the  aforementioned  objective  the  research  question  is:  ‘What  are  the  critical  success 

factors of Batenburg Industriële Elektronica and how can they be collected in order to support the 

development of a performance measurement system?’ 

    

1.3  Research objective 

Upon  completion  the  critical  success  factors  of  the  organization  are  delivered.  Furthermore,  an 

advice will be constructed concerning the development of a PMS by means of providing guidance 

for the design and implementation process, as well as preconditions and organizational requirements 

for developing a PMS.  

 


Performance measurement in SMEs 

 

 



 

   


   

 

       07-12-15 



Koen Brinkerink  



2  Literature 



2.1  Definition of a performance measurement system 

Throughout this study the following definition of a PMS is used:  

A PMS is a system that provides a concise overview of performance through sets of (financial and/or 

non-financial) metrics that guide and support the decision-making processes of an organisation. This 

is  done  by  gathering,  processing  and  analysing  information  about  its  performance,  and 

communicating it in the form of a succinct overview to enable the review and improvement of strategy 

deployment and alignment of key business processes” (Taylor & Taylor, 2014, p. 848). 

 

2.2  Characteristics of  performance measurement systems 

A PMS can be defined based upon the features, roles, and processes it contains (Franco-Santos et 

al., 2007). Fundamentally a PMS consists out of two features, namely: performance indicators and 

the supporting infrastructure. Performance indicators are multidimensional and comprise of  financial 

and  non-financial  perspectives  (e.g.  Franco-Santos  et  al.,  2007;  Garengo  et  al.,  2005;  Kaplan  & 

Norton,  1996).  The  supporting  infrastructure  consist  of  the  developed  procedures  for  transforming 

raw  data  into  useful  information  and  the  personnel  involvement  executing  the  process  (Franco-

Santos et al., 2007). 

 

2.2.1.1  Performance indicators 

A  performance-indicator  “can  be  defined  as  a  metric  used  to  quantify  the  efficiency  and/or 

effectiveness of an action” (Neely, Gregory & Platts, 2005, p. 1229). Developing a valid, useful and 

understandable  indicator  can  be  done  by  employing  the  ‘performance  measurement  record  sheet’ 

(Neely et al., 2002; Neely, Richards, Mills, Platts & Bourne, 1997).  

 

As  a  whole,  the  set  of  performance  indicators  need  to  be  balanced  and  give  a  comprehensive 



representation  of  the  organization.  This  can  be  accomplished  by  successively  answering  the 

following  question  “Are  the  objectives  that  have  been  identified  balanced?;  Do  they  relate  tot  the 

internal and external dimensions of performance?; Do they cover both the financial and non-financial 

dimensions?” Do they challenges for both the short and long term?” (Neely et al., 2002, p. 59) 

 

2.2.1.2  Supporting infrastructure  

The  supporting  infrastructure  (Franco-Santos  et  al.,  2007)  consists  out  of  procedures  for  data 

acquisition,  data  collection,  data  sorting,  data  interpretation,  and  data  presentation  (Kennerley  & 

Neely, 2003). The infrastructure must to efficient and effective (Kennerley & Neely, 2003). 

 

2.2.2  Roles of performance measurement systems 

Appliance  of  a  PMS  can  be  summed  up  according  to  five  categories:  performance  measurement; 

strategic  management;  communication;  influencing  behaviour;  and  learning  &  improving  (Franco-

Santos et al., 2007).  

 

2.2.3  Processes of performance measurement systems  

A PMS involves five quintessential processes, namely: selecting and designing measures; collecting 

and manipulating data; managing information; performance evaluation and rewarding; system review 

(Franco-Santos et al., 2007).   

 

2.3  Performance measurement models  

Development  of  performance  measurement  systems  can  be  traced  back  to  dissatisfaction  of 

accounting  systems  during  the  late  ’80.  These  systems  weren’t  capable  of  presenting  a 

comprehensive view of organizational performances (Nudurupati, Bititci, Kumar & Chan, 2011). This 

criticism during the ’90 has led to the development of models and techniques by which a PMS can 

be constructed.  

 

PMS-models that gained popularity during the nineties (Taticchi et al., 2008; Yadav & Sagar, 2013) 



are, among others: the Balanced Scorecard (BSC); Strategic Measurement and Reporting Technique 

(SMART);  The  Performance  Measurement  Matrix;  The  Performance  Prism;  The  EFQM  Business 

Excellence Model (Nudurupati et al., 2011). By applying a model one can develop an effective PMS 

(Taticchi et al., 2012). These models seek balance between financial and non-financial performance 



Performance measurement in SMEs 

 

 



 

   


   

 

       07-12-15 



Koen Brinkerink  

indicators,  short  and  long  term  focus,  leading  and  lagging  indicators  (Kaplan  &  Norton,  1992; 



Taticchi et al., 2010), and lead to strategic alignment (e.g. de Leeuw & van den Berg, 2011; Melnyk, 

Bititci, Platts, Tobias & Andersen, 2014; Pun & White, 2005). “All these models and frameworks were 

concerned with what to measure and how to structure the PMS, i.e. they try to answer the question 

‘‘how to design the PMS?”.” (Nudurupati et al., 2011, p. 281). 

 

A performance measurement system should (Neely et al., 2002): “contain balanced a mix of financial 



and  non-financial  indicators”(p.  11);  stimulate  employees  to  ‘do  the  right  things’;  help  predict  the 

future and make understandable what is occurring in the organization; contain a review process by 

which performance measures can be adapted and remain its relevance. 

 

2.3.1  Balanced Scorecard 

The  model  that  most  likely  gained  most  attention  from  both  academics  and  businesses  (Biazzo  & 

Garengo,  2012c;  Hudson  et  al.,  2001;  Taticchi  et  al.,  2010)  is  the  Balanced  Scorecard  (Kaplan  & 

Norton, 1992) (figure 1). This model is composed out of four perspectives that determine short and 

long  term  objectives,  contains  financial  and  non-financial  perspectives,  and  includes  leading  and 

lagging indicators (Kaplan & Norton, 1996). The Balanced Scorecard links mission, vision en strategy 

to operational activities (Kaplan & Norton, 1996). The goal of the Balanced Scorecard is to support 

an organization in strategy implementing (van Veen-Dirks & Wijn, 2004). 

 

Central to each of the four perspectives is a guiding question that can aid the development of the 



model (Biazzo & Garengo, 2012a). The guiding questions can be found in the figure 1.   

 

Figure 1. The Balanced Scorecard (Kaplan & Norton, 1996) 

 

2.4  Developing performance measurement systems  

The  development  of  a  PMS  can  be  conceptually  (Lohman  et  al.,  2004)  divided  into  three  stages  

(Bourne,  Mills,  Wilcox,  Neely  &  Platts,  2000):  1.  Designing  the  system  and  indicators;  2. 

Implementing the system and procedures for data collection, 3. Using and updating the PMS. 

 

During  the  design  stage  key  objectives  are  identified  and  performance  measurement  are  designed 



(Bourne  et  al.,  2000;  Lohman  et  al.,  2004;  Wouters  &  Sportel,  2005).  This  can  be  achieved  by 

employing a PMS-Model (Taticchi et al., 2012) such as the Balanced Scorecard (Kaplan & Norton, 

1996).  In  the  implementation  stage  systems  and  procedures  are  put  into  action  (cf.  Nudurupati  & 

Bititci, 2005; Nudurupati et al., 2011) in order to ensure execution of measurement (Lohman et al., 

2004). During the use stage results are judged based on efficiency and effectiveness of activities. In 

addition,  the  success  of  strategy  implementation  is  examined  (Lohman  et  al.,  2004).  In  order  to 

remain relevant, the system have to be updated when the external or internal environment (Kennerley 

& Neely, 2003) changes (Wouters & Sportel, 2005). 

 


Performance measurement in SMEs 

 

 



 

   


   

 

       07-12-15 



Koen Brinkerink  



2.4.1  Designing & implementing performance measurement systems  

During  the  design  stage  ‘how  to  design  the  PMS?’  (Nudurupati  et  al.,  2011)  is  dealt  with.  As 

aforementioned, a PMS must be developed by utilizing a model or framework (Taticchi et al., 2012), 

such as: the Balanced Scorecard (BSC); Strategic Measurement and Reporting Technique (SMART); 

The  Performance  Measurement  Matrix;  The  Performance  Prism;  The  EFQM  Business  Excellence 

Model  (Garengo  et  al.,  2005).  An  effective  design  depends  upon  applying  a    PMS-model  and  

strategy  map,  “choosing  the  measures  and  targets  that  would  help  the  company  to  implement  its 

intended  strategy”  (Franco-Santos  &  Bourne,  2005,  p.  116),  aligning  organizational  mission,  vision 

and  strategy,  aligning  additional  management  systems,  and  the  “process  of  identifying,  selecting 

and developing an appropriate information infrastructure” (Franco-Santos & Bourne, 2005, p. 117).   

 

2.4.2  Design- & implementation methodologies   

Designing  and  implementing  a  PMS-model  like  the  Balanced  Scorecard  can  been  executed  by 

appliance  of  a  process  methodology  (Ahn,  2001;  Bourne,  Neely,  Mills  &  Platts,  2003;  Kaplan  & 

Norton, 1996; Papalexandris, Ioannou, Prastacos & Eric Soderquist, 2005). Process methods ensure 

systematic development of a PMS and thereby its success during implementation (Franco-Santos & 

Bourne, 2005). 

 

How a PMS is developed is dependent upon the objective of such a system (Simons, 1995; Wouters 



&  Wilderom,  2008).  A  PMS  is  a  way  of  formalisation  (a  way  of  standardizing  behaviour  via  rules, 

procedures,  formal  training  and  related  activities).  The  way  it  is  developed  determines  how  the 

system is perceived by managers and employees. A distinction between two types of formalisation 

has been acknowledged, namely: coercive and enabling formalisation (Adler & Borys in Wouters & 

Wilderom, 2008). Coercive formalisation is a method of imposed top-down formalisation, a PMS is 

used  as  a  control  mechanism  and  it  forces  employees  to  comply  with  the  system  (Wouters  & 

Wilderom,  2008).  On  the  other  hand,  enabling  formalisation  employs  a  bottom-up  logic.  Enabling 

formalisation  serves  end-users  needs,  stimulates  ‘dialogue  with  employees’  (Gravesteijn,  Evers, 

Wilderom & Molenveld, 2011), and can lead to more positive employee attitude towards the use of a 

PMS (Groen, 2012) 

  

The  coercive  approach  is  regarded  as  a  ‘typical’  developmental  method  (Lohman  et  al.,  2004; 



Wouters & Sportel, 2005). It employs a structured top-down approach (Lohman et al., 2004) and is 

executed  by  the  management  of  an  organization  (i.e.  Ahn,  2001;  Fernandes  et  al.,  2006;  Kaplan  & 

Norton, 1996; Neely et al., 2002; Papalexandris et al., 2005). This method sees a PMS as a control 

mechanism  for  top  management.  A  typical  coercive  method  is  portrayed  below:  the  Balanced 

Scorecard methodology.  

 

2.4.2.1  Balanced Scorecard methodology  

 


Yüklə 251,22 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə