Carnegie mellon university



Yüklə 119,99 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix04.05.2017
ölçüsü119,99 Kb.

15-319/15-619 Syllabus, v68, MFS, 22 Jan2017 

 

15-319/15619: CLOUD COMPUTING 



COURSE DESCRIPTION & SYLLABUS 

 

CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY 

SPRING 2017

 

1.



 

OVERVIEW 

 

Title: Cloud Computing 

Units: 15-319 is 9 units and 15-619 is 12 units. 

Pre-requisites for undergraduate students: A “C” or better in 15-213.  

Pre-requisites for graduate students: Knowledge of computer systems, programming and 

debugging, with a strong competency in at least one language (such as Java/Python), and the ability 

to pick up other languages as needed. 

 

OLI Course: 

http://oli.cmu.edu



 (accessed through 

https://blackboard.andrew.cmu.edu



) 

The Project Zone: 

https://TheProject.Zone



 

Piazza: 

http://piazza.com/cmu/spring2017/1531915619/home

 

 

Recitation: 

1.

 

Tuesday, 8:00 AM – 8:50 AM, GHC 4307 (Videotaped) 

2.

 

Thursday, 4:30 PM – 5:20 PM, GHC 4307 (VC to SV) (First three weeks and when needed) 

 

Teaching Staff: 

Prof. Majd F. Sakr

 

msakr@cs.cmu.edu

 

GHC 7006, +1-412-268-1161 



Office hours: Tuesday, 3-4pm (Pittsburgh)

 

 

TAs in Pittsburgh typically hold office hours in GHC 5



th

 Floor 


Teaching Commons. The TA office hours are posted on Piazza: 

 



Haokang An (Marshall)  

 



Anthony Corletti  

 



Cameron Dashti  

 



Lu Jiang  

 



Mrigesh Kalvani  

 



Yibai Li  

 



Zebing Lin  

 



Jialing Liu  

 



Yifang Liu  

 



Ziyi Liu  

 



Siyao Lyu  

 



Shardul Mahadik  

 



Yuhan Mao  

 

 



 

 

 



 

Siyao Meng (Scott)  



 

Imre Nagi  



 

Joshua Ocero  



 

Yiqun Ouyang  



 

Quan Quan (Bill)  



 

Prasoon Telang 


 

 



Hochuen Wong  

 



Tianhe Wu  

 



Mengtao Yang  

 



Yin Yi (Elizabeth)  

 



Fengnan Yue  

 



Yang Zhou (yangzhou)  

 

 



15-319/15-619 Syllabus, v68, MFS, 22 Jan2017 

 

2.



 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

This project-based on-line course focuses on skill building across various aspects of cloud computing. We cover 

conceptual topics and provide hands-on experience through projects utilizing public cloud infrastructures 

(Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform (GCP)). The adoption of cloud 

computing services continues to grow across a variety of organizations and in many domains. Simply, cloud 

computing is the delivery of computing as a service over a network, whereby distributed resources  and 

services are rented, rather than owned, by an end user as a utility. 

Conceptually, the course will introduce this domain and cover the topics of cloud infrastructures, virtualization, 

software defined networks and storage, cloud storage, and programming models (analytics frameworks).  As 

an introduction, we will discuss the motivating factors, benefits and challenges of the cloud, as well as service 

models, service level agreements (SLAs), security, example cloud service providers and use cases.  Modern 

data centers enable many of the economic and technological benefits of the cloud paradigm; hence, we will 

describe several concepts behind data center design and management and software deployment.  Next, we 

will focus on virtualization as a key cloud technique for offering software, computation and storage services. 

We will study how CPU, memory and I/O resources are virtualized, with examples from Xen and VMWare, and 

present real use cases such as Amazon EC2. Within the same theme of virtualization, students will also be 

introduced to Software Defined Networks and Storage (SDN and SDS). Subsequently, students will learn about 

different cloud storage concepts including data distribution, durability, consistency and redundancy.  We will 

discuss distributed file systems, NoSQL databases and object storage. HDFS, CephFS, HBASE, MongoDB, 

Cassandra, DynamoDB, S3, Swift and Ceph Object Gateway will be presented as case studies.  Finally, students 

will learn  the details of the MapReduce programming model and gain a broad overview of the Spark, 

GraphLab programming models as well as message queues (Kafka) and stream processing (Samza). 

For the projects, students will work with Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud Platform, 

use them to rent and provision compute resources and then program and deploy applications that run on 

these resources.  Students will develop and evaluate virtual machine (VM) and container scaling, elasticity and 

load balancing solutions. In addition, students will work with cloud storage systems and learn to develop 

different applications using batch, iterative and stream processing frameworks. 15-619 students will have to 

complete an extra project which entails designing and implementing a complete web-service solution for 

querying big data. For the extra project, the student teams are evaluated based on the cost and performance 

of their web service. 

3.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES  



In this on-line course we plan to give students an overview of the field of Cloud Computing, and an in-depth 

study into its enabling technologies and main building blocks.  Students will gain hands-on experience solving 

relevant problems through projects that will utilize existing public cloud tools. It is our objective that students 

will develop the skills needed to become a practitioner or carry out research projects in this domain. 

Specifically, the course has the following objectives: 

Students will learn 

1)

 

the fundamental ideas behind Cloud Computing, the evolution of the paradigm, its applicability; 



benefits, as well as current and future challenges; 

2)

 



the basic ideas and principles in data center design; cloud management techniques and cloud 

software deployment considerations; 

3)

 

different CPU, memory and I/O virtualization techniques that serve in offering software, computation 



and storage services on the cloud; Software Defined Networks (SDN) and Software Defined Storage 

(SDS); 


15-319/15-619 Syllabus, v68, MFS, 22 Jan2017 

 

4)



 

cloud storage technologies and relevant distributed file systems, NoSQL databases and object storage; 

5)

 

the variety of programming models and develop working experience in several of them. 



4.

 

LEARNING OUTCOMES 

The primary learning outcomes of this course are five-fold. Students will be able to: 

1)

 



Explain the core concepts of the cloud computing paradigm: how and why this paradigm shift came 

about, the characteristics, advantages and challenges brought about by the various models and 

services in cloud computing.  

2)

 



Apply fundamental concepts in cloud infrastructures to understand the tradeoffs in power, efficiency 

and cost, and then study how to leverage and manage single and multiple datacenters to build and 

deploy cloud applications that are resilient, elastic and cost-efficient.  

3)

 



Discuss system, network and storage virtualization and outline their role in enabling the cloud 

computing system model. 

4)

 

Illustrate the fundamental concepts of cloud storage and demonstrate their use in storage systems 



such as Amazon S3 and HDFS.  

5)

 



Analyze various cloud programming models and apply them to solve problems on the cloud.  

4.1.


 

BASIC CONCEPTS 

This module will provide a broad overview of cloud computing, its history, technology overview, benefits, 

risks and the economic motivation for it. Upon completion of this module, students will be able to:   



4.1.1.

 

Explain the concept of “cloud computing”. 

4.1.2.

 

Briefly recall the recent history of cloud computing, illustrating its motivation and evolution. 

4.1.3.

 

List some of the enabling technologies in cloud computing and discuss their significance. 

4.1.4.

 

Discuss some of the advantages and disadvantages of the cloud paradigm. 

4.1.5.

 

Articulate the economic benefits as well as issues/risks of the cloud paradigm for businesses as 

well as cloud providers. 

4.1.6.

 

Associate the various layers in the cloud building blocks and differentiate cloud service models. 

4.1.7.

 

Define SLAs and SLOs and illustrate their importance in Cloud Computing. 

4.1.8.

 

Enumerate and explain various threats in cloud security. 

4.1.9.

 

List some of the common cloud providers and their associated cloud stacks and recall popular 

cloud use case scenarios. 

4.2.


 

CLOUD INFRASTRUCTURE 

This module will provide a historical overview of data centers, along with design considerations.  Students 

will learn to apply methods to evaluate data centers, cloud management techniques and software 

deployment considerations. Upon completion of this module, students will be able to: 

4.2.1.

 

Describe the evolution of data centers and outline the architecture of a modern data center. 

4.2.2.

 

Indicate design considerations and discuss their impact. 

4.2.3.

 

Demonstrate the ability to calculate various power requirements of a data center. 

4.2.4.

 

Recall challenges and requirements for a cloud-centric data center and how they differ from 

large, single-entity warehouse-scale computers. 

4.2.5.

 

Explain the cloud software stack and the role of each layer within it. 

4.2.6.

 

Identify the need for and techniques behind automation and orchestration of resources, as well 

as key scheduling considerations in the cloud. 

4.2.7.

 

Evaluate programming, deployment and failure considerations when programming the cloud. 


15-319/15-619 Syllabus, v68, MFS, 22 Jan2017 

 

4.2.8.



 

Understand the implications of building a multi-tier cloud application to achieve resiliency and 

elasticity, and the latency implications of such applications. 

4.2.9.

 

Recall various cloud pricing models and their applicability to various business use cases. 

4.2.10.

 

Recall and describe cloud management techniques such as middleware, resource 

provisioning, metering, and orchestration. 

4.2.11.

 

Describe and evaluate different cloud software deployment considerations such as scaling 

strategies, load balancing, fault tolerance, accounting for tail latencies and optimizing for cost. 

4.3.


 

CLOUD RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

Students will learn how virtualization can allow software and hardware images (e.g., virtual machines) to 

run side-by-side on a single cloud data center while provided security, resource and failure isolations. They 

will understand how virtualization enables clouds to offer software, computation, and storage as services 

as  well  as  attain  agility  and  elasticity  properties.  We  will  discuss  resource  virtualization  in  detail  and 

present multiple examples from Xen and VMware. Finally, we will present a real use case such as Amazon 

EC2. After finishing this unit students will be able to:

 

4.3.1.

 

Identify major reasons for why virtualization is useful, especially on the cloud. 

4.3.2.

 

Explain different isolation types such as fault, resource, and security isolations provided by 

virtualization and utilized by the cloud. 

4.3.3.

 

Indicate how system complexity can be managed in terms of levels of abstractions and well-

defined interfaces, and their applicability to virtualization and the cloud. 

4.3.4.

 

Define resource sharing as provided by virtualization and discuss how it can be offered in space 

and time via physical and logical partitioning. 

4.3.5.

 

Define virtualization and identify different virtual machine types such as process and system 

virtual machines. 

4.3.6.

 

Identify conditions for virtualizing CPUs, recognize the difference between full virtualization and 

paravirtualization, explain emulation as a major technique for CPU virtualization, and examine 

virtual CPU scheduling in Xen. 

4.3.7.

 

Outline the difference between classical OS virtual memory and system memory virtualization, 

explain the multiple levels of page mapping as imposed by memory virtualization, define memory 

over-commitment and illustrate VMWare memory ballooning as a reclamation technique for 

memory over-committed virtualized systems. 

4.3.8.

 

Explain how CPU and I/O devices can communicate with and without virtualization, identify the 

three main interfaces, system call, device driver and operation level at which I/O virtualization 

can be carried, and apply I/O virtualization to Xen. 

4.3.9.

 

Outline recent developments in software defined networking and software defined storage from 

the cloud computing perspective. 

4.4.


 

CLOUD STORAGE 

This module will provide a broad overview of storage technologies and concepts of cloud storage. It will 

also provide a detailed study of Amazon S3, EBS and distributed file systems and databases. Students will 

be able to: 

4.4.1.

 

Describe the overall organization of data and storage. 

4.4.2.

 

List the various types of data within the data taxonomy and classify different data types within 

the data taxonomy. 

4.4.3.

 

Identify the problems of scale and management in big data. Discuss various storage abstractions. 


15-319/15-619 Syllabus, v68, MFS, 22 Jan2017 

 

4.4.4.



 

Compare and contrast different types of file systems and discuss their  design considerations. 

Compare and contrast Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) with Ceph File System (CephFS). 

4.4.5.

 

Compare and contrast different types of databases and discuss their design tradeoffs. 

4.4.6.

 

Discuss the concepts of cloud object storage. Enumerate the different types of block devices used 

in data storage.  

4.5.


 

PROGRAMMING MODELS 

Students will be given an overview on a variety of cloud-based programming models. Students will 

understand the benefits and limitations of each so that they can assess applicability based on the problem 

domain. Students will gain working experience in one of these programming models. Upon completion of 

this module students will be able to: 



4.5.1.

 

Explain the fundamental aspects of parallel and distributed programming models. 

4.5.2.

 

Explain the main execution flow, scheduling and fault tolerance concepts in the MapReduce 

programming model. 

4.5.3.

 

Recall and contrast different cloud programming models (MapReduce, Spark, GraphLab, Spark 

Streaming and Samza). 

5.

 



COURSE ORGANIZATION 

Your participation in the course will involve several forms of activity: 

1.

 

Reading the online coursework content for each unit on OLI. 



2.

 

Completing the unscored inline activities for each unit (Review activities on OLI). 



3.

 

Completing the graded checkpoint weekly quizzes after each unit.  



4.

 

Complete projects which are performed on the cloud and submitted through TheProject.Zone. 



5.

 

AssessMe AssessMents, unscored short quizzes to unlock subsequent project sections. 



6.

 

Complete a team project on building a complete web service. 



Students should regularly check OLI to see when new content or checkpoint quizzes are made available. 

Projects and Checkpoint quizzes must be completed by the due dates posted on TheProject.Zone. 

6.

 

GETTING HELP 



Students are encouraged to ask questions about content and projects through Piazza, where an online class 

portal has been created for this course. The course link for Piazza is: 

 

http://


piazza.com/cmu/spring2017/1531915619/home

There is video recording of a weekly recitation in Pittsburgh which is made available to all students. The 



teaching staff will discuss any major questions that have been posted to Piazza or by email. For urgent 

communication with the teaching staff, it is best to post on Piazza and then send email.   

We will use the course website as the basic portal for the class. The course content is entirely on OLI.  The 

project write-ups, submission, scoreboard and grades are on TheProject.Zone.  The checkpoint quizzes are on 

OLI. OLI can be reached through Blackboard. Announcements, discussions and questions are posted on Piazza.

 

7.

 



POLICIES 

WORKING ALONE ON PROJECTS 



15-319/15-619 Syllabus, v68, MFS, 22 Jan2017 

 

Projects that are assigned to single students should be performed individually.  



HANDING IN PROJECTS 

All assessments are due at 11:59 PM EST (one minute before midnight) on the due dates specified on OLI or 

TheProject.Zone. All hand-ins are electronic, and use the OLI Checkpoint system and TheProject.Zone.  

APPEALING GRADES 

After each project module is graded, you have seven calendar days to appeal your grade. All your appeals 

should be provided by email to Prof. Sakr. 

8.

 

ASSESSMENT 



Inline activities (“Learn by Doing” and “Did I Get This”), which are available in most pages in the OLI course, are 

simple, non-graded activities to assess your comprehension of the material as you read through the course 

material. You are advised to complete all of the inline activities before proceeding through to the next page or 

module. If you missed many of the activities, it is recommended that you review the material again. 

There are five units consisting of modules of content on OLI, each week has a Checkpoint Quiz that you must 

complete before the deadline posted on OLI. Each weekly Checkpoint Quiz will be worth ~2% of your total 

grade. It is your responsibility to ensure that the quiz is submitted prior to the deadline. You will have only a 

single attempt to complete each Checkpoint Quiz on OLI. 

This course includes four individual projects. Each individual project consists of several project modules. Every 

week, a project module has to be completed based on the deadlines posted on TheProject.Zone. The write-up 

required to complete each project module is available on TheProject.Zone. Each module has a submission 

process that is specific to the project module that is due. It is the students’ responsibility to make sure that all 

project work is completed and that the project module is submitted prior to the deadline.  Students typically 

have multiple attempts to submit the project module on TheProject.Zone.  

15-619 students have to complete a team-based multi-week project in parallel to the weekly Project Modules. 

Type 

Number 

Weight 

Content Checkpoint Quizzes 

 

12 


20% 

Projects 

 

4 (15-319) 



5 (15-619) 

80% 


Total Grade 

 

100% 

9.

 



CHEATING 

We urge each student to carefully read the 

university policy on academic integrity

, which outlines the policy on 

cheating, plagiarism or unauthorized assistance. It is the responsibility of each student to produce her/his own 

original academic work. Collaboration or assistance on academic work to be graded is not permitted unless 

explicitly authorized by the course instructor. Each unit checkpoint quiz or project module submitted must be 

the sole work of the student turning it in. Student work on the cloud is logged, submitted work will be closely 

monitored by automatic cheat checkers, and students may be asked to explain any suspicious similarities with 

any piece of code available. The following are guidelines on what collaboration is authorized and what is not: 

WHAT IS CHEATING? 


15-319/15-619 Syllabus, v68, MFS, 22 Jan2017 

 

1.



 

Sharing code or other electronic files either by copying, retyping, looking at, or supplying a copy of 

any file. Copying any code from the internet (stackoverflow.com or github or others). 

2.

 

Copying answers to any checkpoint quiz from another individual, published or unpublished written 

sources, and electronic sources. 

3.

 

Collaborating with another student or another individual on checkpoint quizzes or project modules. 



4.

 

Sharing written work, looking at, copying, or supplying work from another individual, published or 

unpublished written sources, and electronic sources. 

5.

 

Collaboration in team projects is strictly limited to the members of the team. 

WHAT IS NOT CHEATING? 

1.

 

Clarifying ambiguities or vague points in class handouts. 



2.

 

Helping others use computer systems, networks, compilers, debuggers, profilers, or system facilities. 



3.

 

Helping others with high-level design issues. 



4.

 

Guiding others through code debugging but not debugging for them. 

Cheating in projects will also be strictly monitored and penalized. Be aware of what constitutes cheating (and 

what does not) while interacting with students. You cannot share or use written code, and other electronic 

files from students. If you are unsure, ask the teaching staff. 

Be sure to store your work in protected directories. The penalty for cheating is severe, and might jeopardize 

your career – cheating is simply not worth the trouble. By cheating in the course, you are cheating yourself; 

the worst outcome of cheating is missing an opportunity to learn. In addition, you will be removed from the 

course with a failing grade. We also place a record of the incident in the student’s permanent record.  

10.


 

CONCEPTUAL TOPICS 

The course content will be structured into the following units: 



Unit # 

Title 

Modules and Description 



Introduction 

Definition and evolution of Cloud Computing 

Enabling Technologies, Service and Deployment Models 

Popular Cloud Stacks and Use Cases 

Benefits, Risks, and Challenges of Cloud Computing 

Economic Models and SLAs 

Topics in Cloud Security 



Cloud Infrastructure 

Historical Perspective of Data Centers 

Datacenter Components: IT Equipment and Facilities 

Design Considerations: Requirements, Power, Efficiency, & Redundancy 

Power Calculations, PUE and Challenges in Cloud Data Centers 

Cloud Management and Cloud Software Deployment Considerations 



Virtualization 

Virtualization (CPU, Memory, I/O), Case Study: Amazon EC2 

Software Defined Networks (SDN) 

Software Defined Storage (SDS) 



Cloud Storage 

Introduction to Storage Systems 

Cloud Storage Concepts 

Distributed File Systems (HDFS, Ceph FS) 

Cloud Databases (HBase, MongoDB, Cassandra, DynamoDB) 

Cloud Object Storage (Amazon S3, OpenStack Swift, Ceph) 



Programming Models 

Distributed Programming for the Cloud 

Data-Parallel Analytics with Hadoop MapReduce (YARN); Iterative Data-

Parallel Iterative Analytics (Spark); Graph-Parallel Analytics with 

GraphLab 2.0 (PowerGraph); Stream Processing (Samza) 


15-319/15-619 Syllabus, v68, MFS, 22 Jan2017 

 

11.



 

PROJECTS 

The programming projects in this course will be geared towards providing hands-on experience with various 

cloud technologies. Students will learn to develop all projects using various public cloud services (primarily 

AWS and some work on Azure and GCP). Students will be given a budget for cloud resources for each project 

and are expected to work within the budget otherwise, they risk being penalized. 

11.1.


 

PROJECT 1: BIG DATA ANALYSIS 

Students will work with Amazon AWS and provision their first compute resources. Students will setup 

AWS accounts, work with provisioning management software and launch instances on Amazon EC2. 

Students will learn the benefits and tradeoffs of running programs in parallel, using AWS EMR or Azure 

HDInsight, versus sequential on a large dataset. Students will have to solve a problem using resources 

provisioned in AWS and Azure within particular cost constraints. 

11.2.


 

PROJECT 2: CLOUD ELASTICITY 

In this project, students will learn about cloud elasticity through virtual machines and containers. Students 

will be first tasked with developing their own elastic services for a dynamically changing load scenario 

using AWS, Azure and GCP APIs. Students will then work with the Load Balancing and Auto Scaling services 

on AWS to mitigate varying loads on the server. Furthermore, students will build a hands-on in-browser 

programming web service using Docker Containers and Kubernetes on the AWS, Azure and GCP cloud 

platforms.  

11.3.

 

PROJECT 3: CLOUD STORAGE  



Using AWS resources, students will work on cloud storage technologies to evaluate their capabilities and 

limitations, each week with a new workload and a storage system. Students begin by exploring the 

limitations of traditional filesystems, and then compare them to relational databases (MySQL) and NoSQL 

databases (HBase). Next, students will build a social network timeline using heterogeneous back-end 

storage systems. The project will cover several storage systems, including low-latency KV stores, NoSQL 

databases, and in-memory databases (examples include Apache HBase, Amazon RDS, MongoDB and 

others). Finally, students explore sharding and replication of a simple key-value store while implementing 

strong consistency for geo-replicated key-value stores.  

11.4.

 

PROJECT 4: PROGRAMMING MODELS 



In this project, students will work on developing applications using the MapReduce, Spark, and Samza 

frameworks to experience batch, iterative, graph and stream processing. Students will write their own 

MapReduce code using Apache Hadoop and provision instances on Amazon EC2 to run them in order to 

build their own input text predictor, similar to 

Google Instant

. Students will build the input text predictor 

from a large text corpus by generating a list of n-grams, building a statistical language model using the n-

grams, and creating a user interface. Students will also be introduced to iterative programming models by 

implementing a social graph analysis algorithm on Apache Spark. Finally, students will learn to deal with 

streaming data to perform real-time processing of multiple data streams using Apache Kafka/Samza. 

 

 


15-319/15-619 Syllabus, v68, MFS, 22 Jan2017 

 

11.5.



 

15-619 TEAM PROJECT: TWITTER ANALYTICS WEB SERVICE 

Students will work in teams to design and implement a complete web-service that uses the REST interface 

to respond to queries that require running an analytics job on a large (1.2TB) Twitter data set which is 

stored in a database (MySQL, HBASE, etc.).  In this team project, student teams are expected to use 

different tools and services to achieve build a performing web-service that meets the requirements. The 

students' web-services are evaluated through a load generator for a fixed time period (several hours) by 

measuring the cost of cloud resources used and their system’s performance (throughput). There is an 

upper bound on the budget which could cause students to be disqualified. Students are evaluated based 

on how their service performs compared to a baseline. 

12.

 

 SCHEDULE 



The tentative schedule is as follows (specific deadlines are posted on OLI and TheProject.Zone): 

Week  Monday 

OLI Content 

Individual Projects 

Team Project 

Quizzes 

1/16/2017  Unit 1, Module 1, 2 



Primers/P0 (Jan 22)   

Q0 (Ac. Integ.) 

1/23/2017  Unit 1, Module 1, 2 



P1.1 (Jan 29) 

 

Q1 (Jan 27) 



1/30/2017  Unit 2, Module 3, 4 

P1.2 (Feb 5) 

 

Q2 (Feb 3) 



2/6/2017  Unit 2, Module 5, 6 

P2.1 (Feb 12) 

 

Q3 (Feb 10) 



2/13/2017  Unit 3, Module 7, 8, 9 

P2.2 (Feb 19) 

 

Q4 (Feb 17) 



2/20/2017  Unit 3, Module 10, 11, 12  P3.1 (Feb 26) 

 

Q5 (Feb 24) 



2/27/2017  Unit 3, Module 13 

P3.2 (Mar 5) 

Project Out (Feb 27) 

Q6 (Mar 3) 

3/6/2017  Unit 4, Module 14 



 

 

Q7 (Mar 9) 



3/13/2017  Spring Break 

 

 

 



10 

3/20/2017  Unit 4, Module 15 

P3.3 (Mar 26) 

 

Q8 (Mar 24) 



11 

3/27/2017  Unit 4, Module 16, 17 

 

Phase 1 Due (Apr 2) 



Q9 (Mar 31) 

12 


4/3/2017  Unit 5, Module 18 

P4.1 (Apr 9) 

 

Q10 (Apr 7) 



13 

4/10/2017  Unit 5, Module 19, 20

 

 

Phase 2 Due (Apr 16)



 

Q11 (Apr 14)

 

14 


4/17/2017  Unit 5, Module 21, 22 

P4.2 (Apr 23) 

 

 

15 



4/24/2017   

 

Phase 3 Due (Apr 30)  Q12 (Apr 28) 



16 

5/1/2017   

P4.3 (May 5) 

 

 



 

 


15-319/15-619 Syllabus, v68, MFS, 22 Jan2017 

 

 



 

13.


 

 TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF 

Do your best to maintain a healthy lifestyle this semester by eating well, exercising, avoiding drugs and alcohol, 

getting enough sleep and taking some time to relax. This will help you achieve your goals and cope with stress. 

All of us benefit from support during times of struggle. You are not alone. There are many helpful resources 

available on campus and an important part of the college experience is learning how to ask for help. Asking for 

support sooner rather than later is often helpful. 

If you or anyone you know experiences any academic stress, difficult life events, or feelings like anxiety or 

depression, we strongly encourage you to seek support. Counseling and Psychological Services (CaPS) is here 

to help: call 412-268-2922 and visit their website at 

http://www.cmu.edu/counseling/

. Consider reaching out 

to a friend, faculty or family member you trust for help getting connected to the support that can help. 

If you or someone you know is feeling suicidal or in danger of self-harm, call someone immediately, day or 

night: 


CaPS: 412-268-2922 

Re:solve Crisis Network: 888-796-8226 

If the situation is life threatening, call the police: 

 

On campus: CMU Police: 412-268-2323 



 

Off campus: 911 



If you have questions about this or your coursework, please let me know. 

Yüklə 119,99 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə