Consensus statement the Toronto Consensus for the Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Adults



Yüklə 0,75 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/6
tarix26.02.2017
ölçüsü0,75 Mb.
#9579
  1   2   3   4   5   6

CONSENSUS STATEMENT

The Toronto Consensus for the Treatment of

Helicobacter pylori

Infection in Adults

Carlo A. Fallone,

1

Naoki Chiba,



2

,

3



Sander Veldhuyzen van Zanten,

4

Lori Fischbach,



5

Javier P. Gisbert,

6

Richard H. Hunt,



3

,

7



Nicola L. Jones,

8

Craig Render,



9

Grigorios I. Leontiadis,

3

,

7



Paul Moayyedi,

3

,



7

and John K. Marshall

3

,

7



1

Division of Gastroenterology, McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada;

2

Guelph GI and



Surgery Clinic, Guelph, Ontario, Canada;

3

Division of Gastroenterology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada;



4

Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada;

5

Department of



Epidemiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas;

6

Gastroenterology Service, Hospital



Universitario de la Princesa, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Princesa (IIS-IP) and Centro de Investigación Biomédica

en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEREHD), Madrid, Spain;

7

Farncombe Family Digestive Health



Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada;

8

Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and



Nutrition, The Hospital for Sick Children, Departments of Paediatrics and Physiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario,

Canada; and

9

Kelowna General Hospital, Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada



This article has an accompanying continuing medical education activity, also eligible for MOC credit, on page e25. Learning

Objective: Upon completion of this examination, successful learners will be able to establish a treatment plan for patients with

H pylori infection.

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Helicobacter pylori infection is

increasingly dif

ficult to treat. The purpose of these consensus

statements is to provide a review of the literature and speci

fic,


updated recommendations for eradication therapy in adults.

METHODS: A systematic literature search identi

fied studies

on H pylori treatment. The quality of evidence and strength of

recommendations were rated according to the Grading of

Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation

(GRADE) approach. Statements were developed through an

online platform,

finalized, and voted on by an international

working group of specialists chosen by the Canadian Asso-

ciation of Gastroenterology. RESULTS: Because of increasing

failure of therapy, the consensus group strongly recommends

that all H pylori eradication regimens now be given for 14

days. Recommended

first-line strategies include concomitant

nonbismuth quadruple therapy (proton pump inhibitor

[PPI]

þ amoxicillin þ metronidazole þ clarithromycin



[PAMC]) and traditional bismuth quadruple therapy (PPI

þ

bismuth



þ metronidazole þ tetracycline [PBMT]). PPI triple

therapy (PPI

þ clarithromycin þ either amoxicillin or

metronidazole) is restricted to areas with known low clari-

thromycin resistance or high eradication success with these

regimens. Recommended rescue therapies include PBMT and

levo

floxacin-containing therapy (PPI þ amoxicillin þ levo-



floxacin). Rifabutin regimens should be restricted to patients

who have failed to respond to at least 3 prior options.

CONCLUSIONS: Optimal treatment of H pylori infection re-

quires careful attention to local antibiotic resistance and

eradication patterns. The quadruple therapies PAMC or

PBMT should play a more prominent role in eradication of H

pylori infection, and all treatments should be given for 14

days.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; Eradication; Resistance; Proton

Pump Inhibitor; Amoxicillin; Bismuth; Clarithromycin; Metro-

nidazole; Tetracycline; Levo

floxacin; Rifabutin.

A

lthough the prevalence of H pylori is decreasing in



some parts of the world, the infection remains pre-

sent in 28% to 84% of subjects depending on the population

tested.

1

Even studies in Western nations, which tend to have



the lowest general prevalence,

1

–4



report high proportions of

infected individuals in certain communities (eg, 38%

–75% of

Alaskan or Canadian aboriginal populations).



2,3,5

–8

H pylori is implicated in the development of and its



eradication is recommended in the treatment of duodenal or

gastric ulcers, early gastric cancer, and gastric mucosa-

associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas (in

<0.01%).

4,9


–14

Treatment has been suggested for prevention of gastric

cancer in high-risk individuals,

11

–13,15



as well as in patients

with uninvestigated

16

and functional dyspepsia,



17

given


evidence

that eradication

of the

infection leads



to

sustained improvements in symptoms in a proportion of

patients.

10,16,17


The increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains

of H pylori has led to reduced success with traditional H

Abbreviations used in this paper: BPAL, bismuth compounds D proton

pump inhibitor

D amoxicillin D levofloxacin; CAG, Canadian Association

of Gastroenterology; CI, con

fidence interval; GRADE, Grading of Recom-

mendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation; ITT, intention-to-

treat; NNT, number needed to treat; PA, proton pump inhibitor

D amoxi-


cillin; PAC, proton pump inhibitor

D amoxicillin D clarithromycin; PAL,

proton pump inhibitor

D amoxicillin D levofloxacin; PAM, proton pump

inhibitor

D amoxicillin D metronidazole; PAMC, proton pump inhibitor D

amoxicillin

D metronidazole D clarithromycin; PAR, PPI D amoxicillin D

rifabutin; PBMT, proton pump inhibitor

D bismuth compounds D

metronidazole

D tetracycline; PICO, Population, Intervention, Compar-

ator, Outcomes; PMC, proton pump inhibitor

D metronidazole D clari-

thromycin; PPI, proton pump inhibitor; RCT, randomized controlled trial;

RD, risk difference.

Most current article

© 2016 by the AGA Institute

0016-5085/$36.00

http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2016.04.006

Gastroenterology 2016;151:51

–69


pylori treatments.

18

–24



Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) triple

therapies (a PPI plus two of the following antibiotics: clar-

ithromycin, amoxicillin, or metronidazole) for 7 to 10 days

were once standard and recommended as

first-line

therapy


11

–13,25


but have become increasingly ineffective,

with some studies reporting eradication in less than 50% of

cases.

21,22,26


–28

Suboptimal patient compliance may be

another cause of treatment failure.

4,29


–31

It has been suggested that the goal of H pylori therapy

should now be eradication in

!90% of treated patients.

32

This arbitrary threshold is not easily achieved, especially



in real-world settings. However, the most ef

ficacious ther-

apies available should be used

first to avoid the cost,

inconvenience, and risks associated with treatment failure.

Some of the more common regimens for H pylori eradi-

cation include bismuth quadruple therapy (PPI

þ bismuth

compounds

þ metronidazole þ tetracycline [PBMT]), non-

bismuth

quadruple



therapy

(concomitant

[PPI

þ

amoxicillin



þ metronidazole þ clarithromycin {PAMC}] or

sequential [PPI

þ amoxicillin {PA} followed by PPI þ

metronidazole

þ clarithromycin {PMC}]), PPI triple therapy

(PPI


þ amoxicillin þ clarithromycin [PAC], PMC, or PPI þ

amoxicillin

þ metronidazole [PAM]), and quinolone-

containing regimens (PPI

þ amoxicillin þ levofloxacin

[PAL]). De

finitions of these and other regimens discussed in

this consensus paper are shown in

Table 1

, with suggested



doses listed in

Table 2


.

The increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains

and evidence of more frequent failures of triple therapies

suggest the need for more effective therapies given for a

longer duration (14 days instead of 10 or 7 days) than were

recommended in prior consensus statements.

11,12

For this


reason, as well as the existence of new therapies, the

Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG) and the

Canadian Helicobacter Study Group determined that an

update was needed. The purpose of this consensus process

was to systematically review the literature relating to the

management of H pylori infection and to provide speci

fic,

updated recommendations for eradication therapy in



adults. This consensus was limited to adults, because

updated pediatric recommendations are currently in prog-

ress from the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenter-

ology, Hepatology and Nutrition and North American

Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and

Nutrition.

Methods

Scope and Purpose



The consensus development process was initiated in the

summer of 2013 with the

first meeting of the steering com-

mittee and lasted approximately 2 years, with the meeting of

the full consensus group taking place in June 2015.

Sources and Searches

The Editorial Of

fice of the Cochrane Upper Gastrointestinal

and Pancreatic Diseases Group at McMaster University

Table 1.Recommendations for Regimens Used for the Eradication of H pylori

Recommendation

Regimen


De

finition (see dose table)

First line

Recommended

option

Bismuth quadruple (PBMT)



PPI

þ bismuth þ metronidazole

a

þ tetracycline



Recommended

option


Concomitant nonbismuth quadruple (PAMC)

PPI


þ amoxicillin þ metronidazole

a

þ clarithromycin



Restricted option

b

PPI triple (PAC, PMC, or PAM)



PPI

þ amoxicillin þ clarithromycin

PPI

þ metronidazole



a

þ clarithromycin

PPI

þ amoxicillin þ metronidazole



a

Not recommended

Levo

floxacin triple (PAL)



PPI

þ amoxicillin þ levofloxacin

Not recommended

Sequential nonbismuth quadruple

(PA followed by PMC)

PPI


þ amoxicillin followed by PPI þ

metronidazole

a

þ clarithromycin



Prior treatment failure

Recommended

option

Bismuth quadruple (PBMT)



PPI

þ bismuth þ metronidazole

a

þ tetracycline



Recommended

option


Levo

floxacin-containing therapy

(usually PAL)

PPI


þ amoxicillin þ levofloxacin

c

Restricted option



d

Rifabutin-containing therapy (usually PAR)

PPI

þ amoxicillin þ rifabutin



Not recommended

Sequential nonbismuth quadruple

therapy (PA followed by PMC)

PPI


þ amoxicillin followed by PPI þ

metronidazole

a

þ clarithromycin



Undetermined

Concomitant nonbismuth

quadruple therapy (PAMC)

PPI


þ amoxicillin þ metronidazole

a

þ clarithromycin



a

Tinidazole may be substituted for metronidazole.

b

Restricted to areas with known low clarithromycin resistance (



<15%) or proven high local eradication rates (>85%) (see

statement 5).

c

There is some evidence that adding bismuth to this combination may improve outcomes.



d

Restricted to cases in which at least 3 recommended options have failed (see statement 13).

52

Fallone et al



Gastroenterology Vol. 151, No. 1

performed a systematic literature search of the Cochrane Reg-

ister, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL for trials published

from January 2008 to December 2013. The main focus of all

literature searches was to identify data on cure rates of H pylori

infection. We did not systematically search the literature before

2008 because we did not want older data, where higher erad-

ication success rates were likely a result of lower antibiotic

resistance, to confound newer data. Key search terms

were Helicobacter pylori, eradication, bismuth, clarithromycin,

metronidazole, amoxicillin, levo

floxacin, tetracycline, and rifa-

butin, among others, to address each of the statements. Search

strategies were limited to the English language and human

studies, and further details are provided in

Supplementary

Appendix 1

.

A formal systematic review was performed for every



statement. This included a literature search and, as described in

more detail in the following text, a review of the citations to

identify potentially relevant articles, review of selected full-text

articles to identify articles that satis

fied the predefined PICO

components (Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcomes),

a risk-of-bias assessment, and at least a qualitative synthesis of

evidence presented formally to the panel members verbally

and/or with slide presentations at the face-to-face meeting. The

panel also had access to the entire text of all the selected ar-

ticles should they choose to refer to it.

The literature search produced 2943 citations; after

removal of duplicates, 2373 citations remained. These citations

were sorted into three separate lists: (1) results enriched with

randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews/meta-

analyses, and practice guidelines (1509 citations); (2) results

enriched with Canadian studies (an additional 13 citations);

and (3) the remaining 851 citations. Additional focused,

updated searches up to June 2015 were conducted for pre-

sentation at the consensus meeting. In the absence of updated

systematic reviews or meta-analyses on a speci

fic treatment, a

meta-analysis was performed for this consensus when suf

fi-

cient data were available. When a recent well-done meta-



analysis was found, a literature review was also performed to

see if more current data altered the results and conclusions.

Review and Assessment of Evidence

Two nonvoting methodologists (GIL and PM) assessed the

quality (certainty) of evidence using the Grading of Recom-

mendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE)

method.

33

The methodologists assessed the risk of bias (of in-



dividual studies and overall across studies), indirectness,

inconsistency, imprecision, and other considerations (including

publication bias) to determine the overall quality of evidence

for each statement. GRADE assessments were then reviewed

and agreed on by voting members of the consensus group at the

meeting.


The quality of evidence for each statement was graded as

high, moderate, low, or very low, as described in GRADE

33,34

and prior CAG consensus documents.



35,36

Approved product labeling from government regulatory

agencies varies from country to country; although not ignored,

recommendations are based on evidence from the literature

and consensus discussion and may not fully re

flect the product

labeling for a given country.

Consensus Process

The consensus group was composed of 8 voting members

(5 participants and 3 steering committee members), including

gastroenterologists, clinical epidemiologists (one of whom was

not a gastroenterologist), and microbiologists from Canada, the

United States, and Europe with expertise in managing H pylori

infection. There was representation from a pediatric and com-

munity, nonacademic gastroenterologist (not an H pylori

expert), and there was a nonvoting moderator for the meeting

(Dr John K. Marshall). Although there was no primary care

representative, the impact of the recommendations on primary

care physicians, as well as community resources and local

availability, was discussed before voting for each statement.

Before the 2-day consensus meeting was held in Toronto,

Ontario, Canada, in June 2015, CAG facilitated the majority of the

consensus process through the use of a web-based consensus

Table 2.Recommendations for Dose of Agents Used in H

pylori Eradication Therapies

Doses for agents in bismuth quadruple therapy

Bismuth

X mg


a

QID


b

Metronidazole

500 mg

TID to QID



c

PPI


Y mg

d

BID



Tetracycline

500 mg


QID

Doses for agents in all regimens other than bismuth quadruple

therapy (includes PPI triple, concomitant and sequential

nonbismuth quadruple, levo

floxacin, and rifabutin therapies)

Amoxicillin

1000 mg

BID


Clarithromycin

500 mg


BID

Levo


floxacin

500 mg


QD

e

Metronidazole



500 mg

BID


PPI

Y mg


d

BID


Rifabutin

150 mg


BID

NOTE. These are the doses in North America; they may vary

in different parts of the world (eg, 400 mg of metronidazole or

200 mg of clarithromycin may be the preferred doses in parts

of Europe and Asia, respectively).

QID, 4 times a day; TID, 3 times daily; BID, twice daily; QD,

once daily.

a

The dose depends on the formulation used. In clinical trials,



the most common doses were as follows: bismuth subsa-

licylate (262 mg), 2 tablets QID; colloidal bismuth subcitrate

(120 mg), 2 tablets BID or 1 tablet QID; bismuth biskalcitrate

(140 mg), 3 tablets QID; Pylera (Aptalis Pharma US, Inc) (the

combination pill; bismuth subcitrate potassium; 140 mg), 3

tablets QID.

b

Studies (from China) have suggested that giving double the



dose of bismuth twice daily is also effective.

62

c



Good evidence for QID dosing of metronidazole is lacking;

however, some members of the consensus group suggested

that a QID regimen may help simplify dosing for patients (400

mg QID dosing for metronidazole would also be acceptable in

countries where a 400-mg dose is available).

d

The dose depends on the PPI used. Standard doses are



esomeprazole 20 mg, lansoprazole 30 mg, omeprazole 20

mg, pantoprazole 40 mg, and rabeprazole 20 mg (see

statement 8 for discussion of high-dose PPI use). In fact, in

many countries, double doses (eg, esomeprazole 40 mg BID)

are more commonly used (vs standard doses). Although ev-

idence is lacking, the presumed dose for dexlansoprazole is

either 30 mg or 60 mg.

e

In clinical trials, eradication appears to be similar in studies



that use levo

floxacin 250 mg BID or 500 mg QD dosing.

138

July 2016



Toronto Consensus for

H pylori Treatment

53


platform (ECD Solutions, Atlanta, GA). The steering committee

(CAF, NC, SVvZ) developed the initial statements using PICO

components of the underlying research question for each state-

ment (eg, for statement 3, the PICO components were as follows:

population, patients with H pylori infection who have not un-

dergone previous eradication attempts; intervention, traditional

bismuth quadruple therapy for 14 days; comparator, any other

individual eradication therapy [standard triple, sequential,

concomitant, levo

floxacin-based triple, and so on] or compared

with a standard threshold for ef

ficacy [eg, >80% intention-to-

treat {ITT} eradication rate] and safety; outcomes, ITT eradica-

tion rate and safety). They then reviewed the literature search

results for every statement (each article reviewed by at least 2

people) through the web-based platform and

“tagged” (selected

and linked) all relevant references to a speci

fic statement. Only

one member was required to tag a reference for it to remain

linked to the statement. Subsequently, the tagged references were

again assessed by the steering committee; when a meta-analysis

(of suf

ficient quality) was tagged to a statement, any tagged study



that was already included in the meta-analysis was removed from

that particular statement. Any studies performed after the meta-

analysis remained tagged and were used to determine if the more

current data altered the results or conclusions of the meta-

analysis. At the end of this process, 116 papers were selected

and uploaded onto the online platform. All members of the

consensus group had access to complete copies of the

“tagged”


references. The entire consensus group then voted anonymously

on their level of agreement with the speci

fic statements using a

modi


fied Delphi process.

37,38


Two subsequent iterations of the

statements that incorporated suggested changes from the group

followed, after which the statements were

finalized at the live

meeting.

At the 2-day face-to-face meeting, the methodologists, epi-

demiologists, and other members of the panel who had con-

ducted systematic reviews or meta-analyses for the conference

presented, for each statement, a summary of data from existing

meta-analyses from the literature as well as the systematic

reviews or meta-analyses conducted for that statement. The


Kataloq: images -> publications
images -> Мп г. Белгорода «Стоматологическая поликлиника №2» Информированное добровольное согласие на стоматологическое эндодонтическое лечение
images -> Задачами модуля являются
images -> Сагітальні аномалії прикусу. Дистальний прикус. Етіологія, патогенез, клініка та діагностика дистального прикусу
images -> Мп г. Белгорода «Стоматологическая поликлиника №2» Информированное добровольное согласие на проведение ортодонтического лечения
images -> Мп г. Белгорода «Стоматологическая поликлиника №2» Информированное добровольное согласие на пародонтологическое лечение
images -> Yazılım Eleştirisi
publications -> Identify patients in their caseload who have or are at risk for developing metabolic syndrome

Yüklə 0,75 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3   4   5   6




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2022
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə