EMedicine Ethics in Emergency Medicine : Article by Eric Isaac



Yüklə 156,55 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix06.02.2017
ölçüsü156,55 Kb.

eMedicine - Ethics in Emergency Medicine : Article by Eric Isaac...

http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic692.htm

1 di 9

12-06-2006 12:13



 

 

Home



 

 |  


Specialties

 | 


Resource Centers

 |  


Learning Centers

  |  


CME

  |  


Contributor Recruitment

 

 



June 12, 2006 

  

 Articles 



 Images 

 CME 

 

 



Advanced Search

 

  

Consumer Health



Link to this site

eMedicine - Ethics in Emergency Medicine : Article by Eric Isaac...

http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic692.htm

2 di 9

12-06-2006 12:13



You are in: 

eMedicine Specialties 

Emergency Medicine 



Special Aspects Of 

Emergency Medicine 

Ethics in Emergency Medicine

Last Updated: February 13, 2006 

Rate this Article 

Email to a Colleague 

Synonyms and related keywords: ethics in emergency medicine, ethics in medicine, 

medical ethics

 

AUTHOR INFORMATION

Section 1 of 9    

 

Author Information



 

Introduction

 

Glossary Of Terms



 

A Framework For Ethical Decision 

Making

 

Medical Decision Making



 

Sample Case 1

 

Sample Case 2



 

Conclusion

Bibliography

Author: 


Eric Isaacs, MD

, Director of Quality Improvement, Associate Clinical Professor, 

Department of Emergency Services, San Francisco General Hospital

Coauthor(s): 



Peter D'Souza, MD

, Staff Physician, Division of Emergency Medicine, 

Stanford Hospital and Clinics

Eric Isaacs, MD, is a member of the following medical societies: 

American Academy of 

Emergency Medicine

American College of Emergency Physicians



, and 

Society  for 

Academic Emergency Medicine

Editor(s): Robert M McNamara, MD, FAAEM, Professor of Emergency Medicine, Temple 

University; Chief, Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Emergency Medicine, 

Temple University Hospital; Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD, Senior Pharmacy Editor, 

eMedicine; Gino A Farina, MD, Program Director, Associate Professor of Clinical 

Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Long Island Jewish Medical 

Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine; John Halamka, MD, Chief Information 

Officer, CareGroup Healthcare System, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Department of 

Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; Assistant Professor of 

Medicine, Harvard Medical School; and Steven C Dronen, MD, FAAEM, Director of 

Emergency Services, Director of Chest Pain Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, 

Ft Sanders Sevier Medical Center

Disclosure 

 

INTRODUCTION



Section 2 of 9   

 

 



Author Information

 

Introduction



 

Glossary Of Terms

 

A Framework For Ethical Decision 



Making

 

Medical Decision Making



 

Sample Case 1

 

Sample Case 2



 

Conclusion

Bibliography

Most physicians are trustworthy, honest, and ethical. All benefit from a deeper 

understanding of medical ethics because they often encounter situations in which a clear 

"right thing to do" does not exist. Ethical decisions must be made when strong reasons 

for and against a particular course of action are present.

Emergency physicians may feel that they do not have time to consider ethical dilemmas. 

During a busy clinical shift, time to ponder either diagnostic dilemmas or ethical dilemmas 

usually does not exist. How then, should emergency physicians handle difficult decisions 

that must be made in a limited time frame, often under considerable stress? They develop 

guidelines based on scientific or ethical principles that direct their handling of common 

difficult situations. For example, in cardiac arrest and trauma resuscitations, clear 

procedural guidelines exist. Because each clinical situation is different and often 

demands prompt decision-making, the clinician must adapt accepted guidelines to 

individual cases to give the most appropriate and ethical care.

Why develop a framework for ethical decision-making? Medicine is a dynamic field. Not 

only does human knowledge continue to grow and change, but new situations present 

themselves regularly. In addition, continually changing societal attitudes subsequently 

influence thinking about old problems. Issues such as medical futility and 

physician-assisted suicide are in the forefront of current societal thinking and require a 

Quick Find

Author 


Information

Introduction

Glossary  Of 

Terms


A Framework For 

Ethical Decision 

Making

Medical Decision 



Making

Sample Case 1

Sample Case 2

Conclusion

Bibliography

Click for related

images.

Continuing

Education

CME currently not 

offered for this topic.

Click 


here 

for 


sponsored CME.

Patient

Education

Click


 here 

for patient 

education.


eMedicine - Ethics in Emergency Medicine : Article by Eric Isaac...

http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic692.htm

3 di 9

12-06-2006 12:13



response  from  every  practicing  physician.

No substitute for clinical experience exists. One of the key tenants of ethical 

decision-making is to apply rules created in the past to situations in the present. Observe 

how these rules fit, and make adjustments as needed. A framework for ethical 

decision-making can assist in delineating those issues that may need adjustment for a 

new situation.

For excellent patient education resources, visit eMedicine's 

Public Health Center

.  Also, 

see eMedicine's patient education articles 

Informed  Consent

 and 


Patient  Rights

.

 



GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Section 3 of 9   

 

 



Author Information

 

Introduction



 

Glossary Of Terms

 

A Framework For Ethical Decision 



Making

 

Medical Decision Making



 

Sample Case 1

 

Sample Case 2



 

Conclusion

Bibliography

Interpretation of terms used in discussions of medical ethics is as dynamic as other 

changes in medicine. The following is a brief description of terms used in the discussion 

of medical ethics consistent with the current interpretation by most authors:



Autonomy 

Patients have the right to choose actions consistent with their values, goals, and life 

plan, even if their choices are not in agreement with the wishes of family members or the 

recommendation of the physician. Choices should be free from interference and control by 

others.

Beneficence 

Beneficence refers to acting in the best interests of the patients. This concept often is 

confused with nonmaleficence, or "do no harm." Doing what is best for the patient often 

involves  serious  risks.



Confidentiality 

Respecting a patient's privacy and maintaining confidentiality allows people to seek 

treatment and discuss their problems frankly.

Futility 

The term futility may be used in several situations, including the following: The 

intervention has no pathophysiologic rationale. Maximal treatment is failing. The 

intervention has already failed. The intervention will not achieve the goals of care.



Informed consent 

Informed consent is the process by which a patient receives all pertinent information 

necessary to make a rational autonomous choice. Disclosure standards, comprehension, 

voluntary action (free of control of others), competence, and consent are the 5 elements 

of informed consent.

Justice 

Justice refers to fairness in the allocation  of healthcare  resources.



Veracity 

Veracity is truth telling and honesty; recognize that it is not uncommon for healthcare 

providers to misrepresent a situation without technically lying.

 

A FRAMEWORK FOR ETHICAL DECISION MAKING



Section 4 of 9   

 

Author Information



 

Introduction

 

Glossary Of Terms



 

A Framework For Ethical Decision 

Making

 

Medical Decision Making



 

Sample Case 1

 

Sample Case 2



 

Conclusion

Bibliography

Each ethical dilemma may be approached by assessing the issues, naming the dilemma 

(conflicting ethical principles), considering alternative courses of action, implementation, 

and evaluation.



Assess the issues. 

eMedicine - Ethics in Emergency Medicine : Article by Eric Isaac...

http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic692.htm

4 di 9

12-06-2006 12:13



Assessing issues helps to clarify interests and to organize preferences. Ask the following 

questions:

What is the medical situation? This question is about emergency physicians' goals as 

caregivers. What is the appropriate medical intervention? What is the benefit to the 

patient?

What are the patient's preferences? These may be ascertained by determining the 

patient's goals. Patients may choose to live their lives differently than their treating 

physician. For example, the possibility of losing use of the hands may cause a patient to 

refuse a neuropathy-inducing chemotherapy. Assessing the patient's values, needs, 

expectations, and competency; whether the patient is fully informed; and whether consent 

is voluntary is important.

What are the consequences of accepting or refusing the intervention? How will quality of 

life be affected (eg, maintain, restore, improve)? Will patients be able to pursue their own 

goals? What are the external issues involved?

Issues outside of medical fact that both appropriately and inappropriately impact the 

decision-making process include family and social pressures, economics, emotions, 

interpersonal conflict, legal issues, communication, and time pressure.

Name the dilemma. 

Take the time to clearly identify the issues in conflict that have lead to the dilemma being 

addressed. Look over the glossary of terms for a list of basic ethical terms and issues.

Consider alternative courses of action. 

List the alternative courses of action focusing on the pros and cons of each choice so 

that the decision is most consistent with medical opinion and the patient's values and 

goals.


Implement the action. 

Once a plan of action is created, it must be implemented.



Evaluate the outcome. 

An evaluation component is important in the overall process of solving ethical dilemmas, 

particularly when formulating plans to be utilized in future situations. During evaluation, 

include assessment of the actual outcome in regard to patient's goals, values, needs, 

and interaction with external pressures and issues.

 

MEDICAL DECISION MAKING



Section 5 of 9   

 

 



Author Information

 

Introduction



 

Glossary Of Terms

 

A Framework For Ethical Decision Making



 

Medical 


Decision Making

 

Sample Case 1



 

Sample Case 2

 

Conclusion



 

Bibliography

Faced with a decision regarding their medical care, patients usually agree to at least one of the medically 

acceptable  physician  recommendations.  Occasionally,  patient  preferences  conflict  with  physician's 

recommendations and a potential ethical dilemma is born. For example, a patient with a potential life-threatening 

infection requiring intravenous antibiotics may demand to leave the hospital without any treatment. The provider 

must determine whether the patient has the capacity to make this medical decision to refuse care. The capacity 

to make medical decisions is distinct from the issue of competence. Capacity is a clinical determination 

addressing mental functions and a person's ability to make a decision. Competency is a legal definition 

addressing societal interest in restricting an individual's actions or right to make decisions if he or she cannot be 

held accountable for the consequences of his or her decisions and actions.

A patient is considered competent unless a legal determination of incompetence has been made in a court of 

law.

In the early 1980s, the President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and 



Behavioral Research set forth guidelines for establishing decision-making capacity. They include the following:

The patient must have a set of values and goals and the ability to make reasonably consistent choices.

The patient must have the ability to give and receive information as well as have the conceptual skills to 

understand the information and the alternatives.



eMedicine - Ethics in Emergency Medicine : Article by Eric Isaac...

http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic692.htm

5 di 9

12-06-2006 12:13



The patient must have the ability to reason and deliberate about the choices and to compare the impact of 

alternative  outcomes. 

Emergency physicians face special challenges in trying to determine in a short amount of time whether someone 

they have just met is capable of making choices and whether those choices are consistent with the patient's 

values and goals. In addition to the limited time available for data gathering, emergency department (ED) patients 

present special challenges due to medical issues, such as pain, altered mental status, or psychiatric illness, 

that limit their capacity to fully understand their choices. In general, a more stringent standard of capacity is 

applied to refusals of life-saving treatments than diagnoses of lesser morbidity. The patient must be able to 

adequately demonstrate understanding of the risks of refusal to give an informed refusal. The physician has an 

ethical duty to ensure that a patient truly understands the risks of leaving, which requires more than just having 

the patient sign an against medical advice (AMA) form. Every effort should be made to understand why a patient 

wishes to leaveand attempts should be made to present a solution resulting in the optimal outcome for the 

patient.

A common scenario in the ED is the need to make critical decisions when the patient is clearly unable to do so. 

Questions regarding intubation, pressors, blood products, and other invasive procedures in patients who cannot 

communicate their choices are frequently left to decision makers designated by the patient or selected by 

providers or family to represent choices in line with the patient's values. The governing principle is that these 

surrogate decision makers are expected to make choices based on the patient's values, not their own values.

 

SAMPLE CASE 1

Section 6 of 9   

 

 



Author Information

 

Introduction



 

Glossary Of Terms

 

A Framework For Ethical Decision Making



 

Medical 


Decision Making

 

Sample Case 1



 

Sample Case 2

 

Conclusion



 

Bibliography

An 85-year-old Cantonese-speaking patient is brought to the ED by her family for shortness of breath. Her son

translates and provides much of the history. The patient is tachypneic and hypoxic on room air, and the ED

physician is considering intubation. The initial physical examination reveals moderate respiratory distress with

decreased breath sounds on the right side. The son denies any medical problems, but says his mother has had

fluid in her chest before that has needed to be drained. The patient keeps crying out during the examination, and

the son reports she is pleading “help me!” A STAT chest radiograph shows a large right pleural effusion.

After the initial examination, the son pulls the physician aside and says his mother has a known diagnosis of 

metastatic colon cancer with a history of pleural effusions. She does not yet know of her diagnosis and lets her 

son make all her medical decisions. Her husband died of lung cancer last year, and the family feels the patient 

would have an undue burden knowing her diagnosis. She is being monitored by an oncologist, and the family has 

decided on supportive care instead of aggressive treatment. The son says his mother would not want to be 

intubated, although she has never signed any advance directives. He asks that the physician treat his mother 

for her symptoms, including a thoracentesis if needed, but not mention the word "cancer" in front of her as she 

knows what this word means from her multiple visits with her husband.

What should the ED physician do? Follow the framework for ethical decision making.

Assess the issues. 

What is the medical situation? The patient has been brought by family members to the ED with worsening 

shortness of breath. Her condition is likely to worsen without acute intervention. She will need a thoracentesis to 

relieve her symptoms; however, this procedure requires informed consent. The emergency physician is 

considering intubation for respiratory distress, although the son is reporting she would not want to be put on 

mechanical ventilation. Unfortunately, the language barrier and cultural divide currently prevents communication 

with the patient.

What are the patient's preferences? Without an independent medical interpreter, knowing the answer to this 

question is impossible. The son is telling the physician that the family feels it is better for the patient to not know 

her diagnosis and is willing to act as a surrogate decision maker. The family presumably has a better 

understanding of the cultural and familial issues involved. How does the emergency physician know that the 

family is making decisions in accordance with the patient's values and goals when he or she has just met the 

patient for the first time? Presumably, the patient has been seen and evaluated by an oncologist, who has had 

more time to deal with some of these critical issues and has decided not to pursue aggressive treatment. The 

emergency physician hopes the oncologist has made a wise choice based on compiling all available information.

Who will provide the consent? The son appears very involved in his mother's care and he may be able to provide 

consent on his mother's behalf. Without paperwork stating that his mother wants him to make all her medical 

decisions, what is necessary to secure this permission? The patient does not know her diagnosis, so 

explanation of the need for the procedure is not possible without telling the patient more information. How much 

information is necessary? If the decision is made to speak with the patient herself, is it possible to get informed 

consent for the procedure while respecting the wishes of the family not to disclose the primary diagnosis? Is the 

patient's acute medical condition (hypoxia) interfering with her capacity to make significant medical decisions?

What are the legal ramifications? The emergency physician faces the challenge of potentially intubating a patient 


eMedicine - Ethics in Emergency Medicine : Article by Eric Isaac...

http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic692.htm

6 di 9

12-06-2006 12:13



against her will or not intubating a patient based on preferences expressed by a family member without the 

patient providing written advanced directives. In addition, performing a thoracentesis in this situation may require 

consent.

What are the pragmatic issues? The emergency physician has very limited information during the brief 

interaction. Are other family members involved in the mother's care who feel she would want to be intubated?

Perhaps if the patient knew she had cancer, she would refuse the thoracentesis, or perhaps she would be 

interested in aggressive treatment. Time is of the essence in the ED, and if the patient is in distress, there is 

little time to investigate all of the possibilities.



Name the dilemma. 

This case involves  autonomy, beneficence,  informed  consent, and veracity.

Consider alternative courses of action. Potential courses of action might include the following:

Perform the thoracentesis as requested by the son with the son's consent.

Find an interpreter and either confirm that the patient would want her son to make her medical decisions or

discuss the case with the patient including her diagnosis. Alternatively, the physician may obtain consent

for the procedure to “remove fluid from around her lungs” for symptomatic relief without disclosing the

cause of the fluid accumulation.

Attempt to contact the patient's oncologist to discuss the case further and confirm what the son has told 

the physician. This option may not be possible depending on the call schedule and time of day.

Try bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) as a noninvasive method to improve respiratory status.

Intubate the patient, providing more time to pursue additional family members to provide input and allowing 

input from an intensivist as well as the patient's oncologist. Ethically, there is no distinction between 

withholding and withdrawing care. In fact, unless patients and providers are allowed to discontinue care, 

they may never try potentially life-saving interventions. 

Implement the action. 

After considering the alternatives and their likely outcomes, the physician must choose the path that he or she 

feels would lead to the outcome most desired by the patient.

Evaluate the outcome. 

Strong arguments can be made both for and against multiple courses of action in this case. Many of the 

treatment decisions depend on choices made early in the case. The challenge for the emergency physician is to 

take limited information and systematically place it within an ethical framework in a short timeframe.

After taking action, the physician must see if the actual outcome was as predicted. The physician can use this 

information should a similar case arise in the future.

 

SAMPLE CASE 2

Section 7 of 9   

 

 



Author Information

 

Introduction



 

Glossary Of Terms

 

A Framework For Ethical Decision Making



 

Medical 


Decision Making

 

Sample Case 1



 

Sample Case 2

 

Conclusion



 

Bibliography

Ethical dilemmas in the ED frequently involve legal issues. Physicians often confuse the two, looking to the law 

for answers to an ethical question. Physicians must realize that ethics and the law are separate entities 

frequently resulting in conflicting recommendations.

Patient refusal and the law 

Two city police officers bring a 28-year-old woman into the ED at 1 am. She is under arrest for suspicion of crack 

cocaine possession with intention to sell. The officers relate that crack dealers routinely position a woman a half 

block away to distribute crack to the buyer after the sale is made. At times, women who distribute drugs may 

hide small plastic bags of drugs in their vaginas after observing nearby police. While engaged in undercover 

operations in an area of high volume drug dealing, the arresting officers report that they saw this woman put her 

hands down her pants as they approached her for questioning.

The officers ask the ED physician to perform a vaginal examination and procure the suspected drugs. The 

woman says, "With all due respect, doctor, I am refusing your examination." Her vital signs are pulse 68, blood 

pressure 114/72, respirations 16, and temperature 37.1.

In anticipation of this refusal, the police have procured a search warrant directing a doctor or a nurse to examine 

the woman's vaginal cavity for contraband.



eMedicine - Ethics in Emergency Medicine : Article by Eric Isaac...

http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic692.htm

7 di 9

12-06-2006 12:13



What should the ED physician do?

The first step in the process of handling an ethical dilemma is to determine if a rule already exists for a similar 

situation. Are other patients brought to the ED by law enforcement officers for a diagnostic procedure against 

the patient's will in the interests of justice? Certainly, patients brought for legal blood draws while in custody for 

driving while intoxicated would fit this scenario. In these cases, if no danger to the patient and staff exists, the 

blood draw is performed. Is this situation different?

Follow the framework for ethical decision-making.

Assess the issues. 

What is the medical situation? Does an indication for the examination exist? At the moment, the patient's vital 

signs do not indicate any toxicity from a sympathomimetic agent.

Should an examination be performed against the patient's will because a reliable observer noted potentially risky 

activity?

Would performing the procedure benefit the patient? If cocaine or crack is present in her body, she may become 

toxic and susceptible to a morbid outcome.

Is the examination risky? A pelvic examination may be painful, uncomfortable, and embarrassing but few health 

care professionals would find it risky. However, if the patient is not cooperative during the examination, injury 

may result. In addition, forcing an examination on a patient may be risky because she may be hesitant to seek 

care in the future as a result of this experience.

What are the patient's preferences? The patient clearly has expressed her opposition to receiving a pelvic 

examination. However, the patient may not have had time to assess her values and needs. How much time does 

she need?

Is she competent to make this decision while in custody? While incarcerated prisoners have lost many personal 

freedoms, they still are entitled to make medical decisions with regard to their own well being.

Are her expectations of medical care realistic? The physician should act in the patient's best interests and not 

be in partnership with law enforcement. In addition, if additional signs and symptoms develop, the patient should 

expect access to later medical care despite the current refusal of care.

Given her state of custody and duress, can her decisions be considered as voluntary; does this issue matter in 

this case? What are the consequences of her decision and the potential actions of emergency physicians? She 

may be at risk of physical harm if she has cocaine and it is not retrieved. Forcing an examination on her also 

may cause physical harm. Is emotional harm possible, as well?

Refusing to heed the patient's wishes would violate any present and future doctor-patient relationship. Does this 

relationship take precedence over all others, including a physician's duty to society and justice?

The ED physician may be in contempt of court with a refusal to follow the legal orders of a search warrant.

What are the pragmatic issues? The law appears to be the overriding pragmatic issue tempering our actions in 

this situation. No family is present to consult. Economics is not an issue, unless the contract for reimbursement 

between the ED and the Department of Corrections is scheduled for negotiation. Time pressures surface 

because law enforcement officials prefer to spend time on the street rather than waiting in the ED.



Name the dilemma. 

Consider the concepts of autonomy, consent, beneficence, and nonmaleficence.



Consider alternative courses of action. 

Alternative courses of action might include the following:

Do nothing and discharge the patient.

Talk to risk management.

Perform the examination.

Collect urine and send it for a toxicology screen.

Perform ultrasonography to look for intravaginal foreign bodies.

Obtain radiographs of the patient and look for foreign bodies. 



eMedicine - Ethics in Emergency Medicine : Article by Eric Isaac...

http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic692.htm

8 di 9

12-06-2006 12:13



Implement the action. 

Follow through with a course of action.



Evaluate the outcome. 

Consider what really happened. In the example above, police obtained a search warrant instructing the ED to 

search the woman's vagina for illegal drugs. The patient continued to refuse any examination and her vital signs 

remained normal during her time in the ED.

The physician on duty believed the patient was competent to refuse the examination and decided to respect her 

autonomy. The physician did not believe that any exceptions mandating waiver of informed consent were 

present. He chose to observe the patient, hoping for a change in the patient's condition indicating a need to 

remove the offending agent. This situation never arose.

The judge suggested radiography or ultrasonography to detect any foreign body. The patient refused all imaging 

procedures. These procedures were considered invasive enough by the attending physician that he heeded the 

patient's  wishes.

The judge suggested a toxicology screen, but the attending physician pointed out that this would be evidence of 

prior use but not possession in the vaginal cavity.

After several hours of research, the hospital attorney felt that the physician legally was required to obey the 

search warrant. However, the attending physician refused to examine the patient against her wishes.

After 12 hours of observation, the patient finally agreed to be examined. No illegal drugs were found.

 

CONCLUSION

Section 8 of 9   

 

 



Author Information

 

Introduction



 

Glossary Of Terms

 

A Framework For Ethical Decision Making



 

Medical 


Decision Making

 

Sample Case 1



 

Sample Case 2

 

Conclusion



 

Bibliography

Emergency physicians are faced with ethical dilemmas nearly every day. Most are solved through previous 

experience and sharing opinions with colleagues.

A framework for ethical decision-making is useful in gaining needed experience and in helping to formulate ideas 

and opinions that may be shared with patients, colleagues, and friends.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Section 9 of 9   

 

 



Author Information

 

Introduction



 

Glossary Of Terms

 

A Framework For Ethical Decision Making



 

Medical 


Decision Making

 

Sample Case 1



 

Sample Case 2

 

Conclusion



 

Bibliography

Adams J, Schmidt T, Sanders A: Professionalism in emergency medicine. SAEM Ethics Committee. 

Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. Acad Emerg Med 1998 Dec; 5(12): 1193-9

[Medline]

.

Bullock, C: Reporting Drunk Drivers: A Struggle for Justice. In: Emergency Medicine News. Vol 18(7).



1996.

Chang G, Astrachan B, Weil U: Reporting alcohol-impaired drivers: results from a national survey of

emergency physicians. Ann Emerg Med 1992 Mar; 21(3): 284-90

[Medline]

.

Denny CJ, Kollek D: Practicing procedures on the recently dead. J Emerg Med 1999 Nov-Dec; 17(6): 



949-52

[Medline]

.

Derse AR: Law and ethics in emergency medicine. Emerg Med Clin North Am 1999 May; 17(2): 307-25, 



ix

[Medline]

.

Derse AR: What part of "no" don't you understand? Patient refusal of recommended treatment in the 



emergency department. Mt Sinai J Med 2005 Jul; 72(4): 221-7

[Medline]

.

Iserson KV, Sanders AB, Mathieu D: Ethics in Emergency Medicine, 2nd ed. Galen Press, Ltd; 1995.



Iserson KV: Principles of biomedical ethics. Emerg Med Clin North Am 1999 May; 17(2): 283-306, 

ix

[Medline]



.

Knopp RK, Satterlee PA: Confidentiality in the emergency department. Emerg Med Clin North Am 1999 

May; 17(2): 385-96, x-xi

[Medline]

.

Larkin GL: Ethical issues of managed care. Emerg Med Clin North Am 1999 May; 17(2): 397-415



[Medline]

.

Larkin GL, Marco CA, Abbott JT: Emergency determination of decision-making capacity: balancing 



autonomy and beneficence in the emergency department. Acad Emerg Med 2001 Mar; 8(3): 282-4

[Medline]

.

Lo B: Resolving Ethical Dilemmas: A Guide for Clinicians. Williams and Wilkins; 1995.



Marco CA, Larkin GL: Ethics seminars: case studies in "futility"-challenges for academic emergency 

medicine. Acad Emerg Med 2000 Oct; 7(10): 1147-51

[Medline]

.

Marco CA: Ethical issues of resuscitation. Emerg Med Clin North Am 1999 May; 17(2): 527-38, 



xiii-xiv

[Medline]

.

Moskop JC: Informed consent in the emergency department. Emerg Med Clin North Am 1999 May; 17(2): 



327-40, ix-x

[Medline]

.

O'Mara K: Communication and conflict resolution in emergency medicine. Emerg Med Clin North Am 1999 



eMedicine - Ethics in Emergency Medicine : Article by Eric Isaac...

http://www.emedicine.com/emerg/topic692.htm

9 di 9

12-06-2006 12:13



May; 17(2): 451-9, xii

[Medline]

.

Palmer RB, Iserson KV: The critical patient who refuses treatment: an ethical dilemma. J Emerg Med 1997 



Sep-Oct; 15(5): 729-33

[Medline]

.

Rhodes R, Richardson L, Moros DA: Introduction: issues in medical ethics special challenges of 



emergency medicine. Mt Sinai J Med 2005 Jul; 72(4): 214-5

[Medline]

.

Rice MM: Medical Legal Issues. Emerg Med Clin North Am November, 1993.



Schears RM: Emergency physicians' role in end-of-life care. Emerg Med Clin North Am 1999 May; 17(2): 

539-59, xiv

[Medline]

.

Schmidt TA: Intoxicated airline pilots: a case-based ethics model. - Intoxicated airline pilots: a case-based 



ethics model. 1994 Jan-Feb; 1(1): 55-9

[Medline]

.

Simon JR, Dwyer J, Goldfrank LR: The difficult patient. Emerg Med Clin North Am 1999 May; 17(2): 353-70, 



x

[Medline]

.

NOTE:

Medicine is a constantly changing science and not all therapies are clearly established. New research changes 

drug and treatment therapies daily. The authors, editors, and publisher of this journal have used their best 

efforts to provide information that is up-to-date and accurate and is generally accepted within medical 

standards at the time of publication. However, as medical science is constantly changing and human error is 

always possible, the authors, editors, and publisher or any other party involved with the publication of this 

article do not warrant the information in this article is accurate or complete, nor are they responsible for 

omissions or errors in the article or for the results of using this information. The reader should confirm the 

information in this article from other sources prior to use. In particular, all drug doses, indications, and 

contraindications should be confirmed in the package insert. 

FULL DISCLAIMER

Ethics in Emergency Medicine excerpt



About Us | Privacy | Terms of Use | Contact Us | Advertise | Institutional Subscribers

We subscribe to the 

HONcode principles

 of the 


Health On the Net Foundation

© 1996-2006 by WebMD.



All Rights Reserved

.


Yüklə 156,55 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə