Nfection and



Yüklə 74,89 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix05.05.2017
ölçüsü74,89 Kb.

I

NFECTION AND

I

MMUNITY


,

0019-9567/00/$04.00

ϩ0

Oct. 2000, p. 6069–6072



Vol. 68, No. 10

Copyright © 2000, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Differential Effects of Virulent versus Avirulent Legionella

pneumophila on Chemokine Gene Expression in Murine

Alveolar Macrophages Determined by cDNA Expression

Array Technique

NORIYA NAKACHI, KAZUTO MATSUNAGA, THOMAS W. KLEIN, HERMAN FRIEDMAN,

AND

YOSHIMASA YAMAMOTO*



Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of South Florida College of Medicine,

Tampa, Florida 33612

Received 31 March 2000/Returned for modification 6 June 2000/Accepted 3 July 2000



The cDNA expression array technique is a powerful tool to determine, at one time from many genes, specific

gene messages modulated by infection. In the present study, we identified genes modulated in response to

virulent versus avirulent Legionella pneumophila infection of the alveolar macrophage cell line MH-S by the

cDNA expression array technique. Many macrophage genes were found to be modulated after 5 h of in vitro

infection with L. pneumophila. In particular, it was found that the monocyte chemotactic protein 3 (MCP-3)

gene expression was significantly induced by infection with virulent L. pneumophila but not with avirulent L.

pneumophila. In contrast, other chemokine genes, such as macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1

, were



induced by both virulent and avirulent L. pneumophila. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay of total RNA

isolated from macrophages infected with the bacteria for 5 or 24 h confirmed the differential induction of the

chemokine genes by virulent versus avirulent L. pneumophila. Thus, the cDNA expression array technique

readily revealed differential induction by L. pneumophila infection of select chemokine genes of macrophages

from more than 1,100 genes. These results also indicate that certain chemokine genes may be selectively

induced by virulent bacteria.

Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legion-

naires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia and sometimes a

systemic infection, especially in immunocompromised individ-

uals with defective immune response mechanisms (4). L. pneu-



mophila is a gram-negative bacillus and grows preferentially in

macrophages and other phagocytic cells. Development of cell-

mediated immunity is known to be essential in host defense to

L. pneumophila infection (6). Specific cytokines are considered

key factors in host immunity to intracellular microorganisms,

especially those produced by macrophages which help to reg-

ulate development of cellular immunity. Although numerous

studies concerning L. pneumophila infection have been con-

ducted, the interaction between this organism and alveolar

macrophages is still not well understood. The newly developed

cDNA expression array technique with membranes can differ-

entially detect more than 1,100 expressed genes at one time

and is considered an excellent method to determine gene mes-

sages which can be expressed by cells (9). Since identifying

genes that are modulated by infection may provide important

insights into the key molecular changes in the pathogenesis of

infection, this relatively new array technique to detect the

expression of different genes was used to investigate L. pneu-

mophila infection in alveolar macrophages.

For these experiments, the MH-S murine alveolar macro-

phage cell line, which was derived from BALB/c mouse alve-

olar macrophages (7), was used as the source of target cells for



L. pneumophila infection. MH-S cells obtained from the Amer-

ican Type Culture Collection, Manassas, Va., were maintained

in RPMI 1640 medium containing 10% heat-inactivated fetal

calf serum (Hyclone Laboratories, Logan, Utah). The MH-S

cells were adhered to a tissue culture dish (100 by 20 mm; BD

Falcon, Franklin Lakes, N.J.) at a concentration of 10

ϫ 10

6

cells/dish for 2 h in 5% CO



2

at 37°C and then used for the

experiments. Virulent L. pneumophila M124 (3) and avirulent

L. pneumophila M124-Av, which was prepared by multiple

passage of M124 (11), were cultured on buffered-charcoal

yeast extract medium (Gibco Laboratories, Madison, Wis.) for

3 days at 37°C, as described previously (3). The virulent L.



pneumophila M124 strain was lethal for genetically susceptible

strain A/J mice, whereas avirulent L. pneumophila strain

M124-Av was not lethal for the strain A/J mice infected intra-

peritoneally (11). The growth of the bacteria in macrophages

was also different between virulent and avirulent L. pneumo-

phila strains (11). That is, virulent L. pneumophila M124

showed a more than 100-fold increase in the number of viable

bacteria in susceptible mouse strain A/J peritoneal macro-

phages during 48 h of culture, but avirulent strain M124-Av did

not. The MH-S cells were infected with either L. pneumophila

M124 or M124-Av for 30 min at a concentration of 100 bac-

teria per cell, washed to remove noninfected bacteria with

Hank’s balanced salt solution, and then incubated in RPMI

1640 medium with 10% fetal calf serum. The number of viable

bacteria in macrophage lysates prepared with 0.1% saponin

(Sigma Chemical Co., St. Louis, Mo.) was determined by stan-

dard plate counts on buffered-charcoal yeast extract medium,

as described previously (13).

Total cellular RNA from cultured cells was extracted with

the Atlas Pure Total RNA labeling system (Clontech, Palo

Alto, Calif.) at 5 h postinfection, and quantification of ex-

tracted RNA was performed with the RiboGreen RNA quan-

* Corresponding author. Mailing address: Department of Medical

Microbiology and Immunology, University of South Florida College of

Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL 33612. Phone:

(813) 974-2332. Fax: (813) 974-4151. E-mail: yyamamot@com1.med

.usf.edu.

6069

 on May 3, 2017 by guest



http://iai.asm.org/

Downloaded from 



titation kit (Molecular Probe, Eugene, Oreg.) in an Fmax flu-

orometer (Molecular Probe). Since the macrophage response

to bacteria is complicated due to involvement of multiple fac-

tors in the bacteria-macrophage interaction, analysis of gene

expression at an early time point of interaction, such as 5 h

postinfection, was chosen for this study. To determine gene

expression, the membrane-based microtechnique with an Atlas

cDNA expression array (mouse 1.2 array; Clontech) was per-

formed in accordance with the manual provided. The array

included 1,176 mouse cDNAs and 9 housekeeping control

cDNAs and negative controls immobilized on a nylon mem-

brane. The cDNAs on a membrane are divided into 22 cate-

gories: (i) 25 cDNAs for cell surface antigens, (ii) 290 cDNAs

for transcription factors and DNA-binding proteins, (iii) 45

cDNAs for cell cycle regulators, (iv) 55 cDNAs for cell adhe-

sion receptors and proteins, (v) 4 cDNAs for extracellular

transporters, (vi) 81 cDNAs for oncogenes and tumor suppres-

sors, (vii) 20 cDNAs for stress response proteins, (viii) 36

cDNAs for ion channels and transport proteins, (ix) 2 cDNAs

for extracellular matrix proteins, (x) 1 cDNA for trafficking and

targeting protein, (xi) 12 cDNAs for metabolic pathways, (xii)

2 cDNAs for posttranslational modification and folding, (xiii)

one cDNA for translation, (xiv) 60 cDNAs for apoptosis-asso-

ciated proteins, (xv) 97 cDNAs for receptors, (xvi) 116 cDNAs

for extracellular cell signaling and communication, (xvii) 160

cDNAs for modulators, effectors, and intracellular transduc-

ers, (xviii) 39 cDNAs for protein turnover, (xix) 57 cDNAs for

cytoskeleton and motility proteins, (xx) 48 cDNAs for DNA

synthesis, repair, and recombination proteins, (xxi) 25 cDNAs

for other, and (xxii) 9 cDNAs for housekeeping genes.

The purified RNA, which was analyzed for genomic DNA

contamination by PCR with primers specific for

␤-actin, was

processed with the gene-specific CDS primer mix (Clontech),

deoxynucleoside triphosphate, [

32

P]dATP, and reverse tran-



scriptase for preparation of cDNA. The

32

P-labeled cDNA was



purified through a Chroma Spin-200 column (Clontech). The

labeled cDNA in a solution of ExpressHyb (Clontech) with

heat-denatured, sheared-salmon-testes DNA was then hybrid-

ized overnight to the Atlas array membrane at 68°C. The mem-

brane was washed in 2

ϫ SSC (1ϫ SSC is 0.15 M NaCl plus

0.015 M sodium citrate) with 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 0.1

ϫ

SSC with 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate, and 2



ϫ SSC, sequen-

tially, and then exposed to a PhosphorImager (Storm 860;

Molecular Dynamics, Sunnyvale, Calif.). Results of the gene

expression were analyzed by computer with Atlas image soft-

ware (Clontech).

L. pneumophila readily infected the MH-S cells, as shown in

Table 1, and 5 h after infection, the bacteria numbers mini-

mally increased in both virulent- and avirulent-L. pneumo-

phila-infected cultures. However, by 24 h after infection, it was

obvious that the virulent L. pneumophila strain grew remark-

ably, but the avirulent strain did not, similar to previous results

concerning growth of virulent versus avirulent L. pneumophila

in primary peritoneal macrophages from genetically suscepti-

ble strain A/J mice (13).

The MH-S cells infected with either L. pneumophila M124

FIG. 1. Phosphorimages of cDNA expression array membranes for MH-S

cells infected with or not infected with L. pneumophila. The total RNA was

extracted from cells infected with either virulent (B) or avirulent (C) L. pneu-



mophila and cells not infected with either strain (A) as the control at 5 h

postinfection and subjected to cDNA expression array assay. Arrowheads, dou-

ble arrowheads, and arrows indicate

␤-actin, MIP-1␤, and MCP-3 cDNA, re-

spectively.

TABLE 1. L. pneumophila growth in MH-S alveolar macrophage

cell line

Time after infection

(h)

Mean growth



a

Ϯ SD of L. pneumophila strain



a

M124 (virulent)

M124-Av (avirulent)

0

3.4



ϫ 10

2

Ϯ 0.5 ϫ 10



2

2.4


ϫ 10

2

Ϯ 0.4 ϫ 10



2

5

5.3



ϫ 10

2

Ϯ 0.4 ϫ 10



2

2.5


ϫ 10

2

Ϯ 0.6 ϫ 10



2

24

6.7



ϫ 10

4

Ϯ 0.8 ϫ 10



4

3.9


ϫ 10

2

Ϯ 0.9 ϫ 10



2

48

1.8



ϫ 10

5

Ϯ 0.2 ϫ 10



5

4.4


ϫ 10

2

Ϯ 0.5 ϫ 10



2

a

Number of viable bacteria (CFU) in MH-S cell lysates measured at indicated

time after infection by plate count method. Data are from triplicate cultures and

represent three experiments.

6070

NOTES


I

NFECT


. I

MMUN


.

 on May 3, 2017 by guest

http://iai.asm.org/

Downloaded from 



or M124-Av were analyzed for gene expression by the cDNA

array technique at an early-infection time point, such as 5 h

postinfection, as compared to gene expression in noninfected

control cells. Comparison of phosphorimages of DNA from

the control cultures not infected with L. pneumophila as com-

pared to cultures infected with virulent L. pneumophila M124

showed that only select genes were significantly modulated

(Fig. 1). Figure 2 shows a semiquantitative analysis of select

genes as the ratio of target gene expression versus housekeep-

ing


␤-actin genes, which was stable between control versus

infected cells. Since there were many genes affected by infec-

tion in terms of expression level, stable up-regulated genes

were specifically assessed between experiments after infection.

As was apparent by analysis of specific gene expression levels

in comparison to

␤-actin gene expression, there were several

genes which were markedly induced by the virulent but not by

the avirulent bacteria (Fig. 2). It should be noted that the lower

expression levels of genes varied between experiments. How-

ever, the expression of several genes related to inflammation

was significantly modulated by infection with L. pneumophila.

In particular, infection with the virulent L. pneumophila M124

strain significantly up-regulated gene expression for monocyte

chemotactic protein 3 (MCP-3) and macrophage inflammatory

protein 1

␣ (MIP-1␣), and p38-2G4 (the gene specifically for

cell cycle-modulated nuclear protein [8]). Other genes, such as

those for MIP-1

␤ and CD40 and the L-myc gene, were induced

by the virulent L. pneumophila strain in some experiments;

however, there was no significant difference between infected

and noninfected groups due to a high variation in gene expres-

sion levels between experiments. It is important to note that

modulation of the gene for MCM5 DNA replication licensing

factor (the CDC46 homolog), which is involved in the initiation

of cell-cycle-specific DNA replication and expression at the

late G1 to S phase (5), seemed to occur readily in the alveolar

macrophage cells infected with avirulent L. pneumophila, but

not in cells infected with the virulent bacteria. However, the

pathophysiological role of this gene in L. pneumophila infec-

tion is not known.

Since an effective host defense against bacterial invasion is

characterized by the vigorous recruitment and activation of

inflammatory cells, chemokine production is considered a crit-

ical event during infection (10). In this regard, chemokine

MCP-3 and MIP-1

␤ messages in L. pneumophila-infected cells

were further investigated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-

PCR). RNA extraction and RT-PCR were performed as de-

scribed previously (12). The PCR primers for

2



-microglobulin

(housekeeping gene), MIP-1

␤, and MCP-3 were designed from

GenBank cDNA sequences using a website program Primer 3

(http://www.path.cam.ac.uk/cgi-bin/primer3.cgi). The PCR was

performed in a Minicycler (MJ Research, Watertown, Miss.)

for either 25 cycles (

2



-microglobulin and MIP-1

␤) or 30 cycles

(MCP-3) and at a 60°C annealing temperature. PCR products

FIG. 2. Gene expression levels for selected genes in MH-S cells infected with L. pneumophila at 5 h postinfection or not infected. Results represented are means

plus standard deviations from three independent experiments.

ء, Ͻ 0.05 compared to noninfected control analyzed by Student’s test. Open column, noninfected

control; closed column, infected with virulent L. pneumophila (M124); gray column, infected with avirulent L. pneumophila (M124-Av).

V

OL



. 68, 2000

NOTES


6071

 on May 3, 2017 by guest

http://iai.asm.org/

Downloaded from 



were analyzed on ethidium bromide-stained 2% agarose gels,

semiquantitated, and normalized to

2

-microglobulin using



densitometry readings.

Both MCP-3 and MIP-1

␤ belong to the CC subfamily of

chemokines and are involved in early inflammatory responses,

including infection (1). In previous studies, we observed induc-

tion of MIP-1

␤ and other chemokines, such as MIP-2 and KC,

by L. pneumophila infection of macrophages (12, 14). How-

ever, chemokine induction by virulent versus avirulent L. pneu-

mophila infection has not yet been reported. The cDNA ex-

pression array experiments revealed that the virulent L.



pneumophila strain induced MCP-3 messages but avirulent

bacteria did not at 5 h postinfection. As shown in Fig. 3, the

results of the cDNA expression array experiments were con-

firmed by RT-PCR. That is, the virulent L. pneumophila M124

strain markedly induced MCP-3 messages, and this was evident

even at 24 h after infection. In contrast, the avirulent L. pneu-



mophila M124-Av strain did not induce any significant level of

MCP-3 messages during infection (P

Ͻ 0.05 compared with

noninfected control group or virulent-bacteria-infected group).

Furthermore, MIP-1

␤ induction also was stimulated at a sim-

ilar level by both virulent and avirulent L. pneumophila strains.

Thus, the virulent L. pneumophila strain induced both MCP-3

and MIP-1

␤, but the avirulent bacteria induced only MIP-1␤.

The mechanism of selective chemokine induction by the

virulent bacteria is not clear. MCPs are known to down-regu-

late interleukin 12 induction induced by bacteria such as Staph-

ylococcus aureus (2). Other current studies also showed inter-

leukin 12 down-regulation by virulent L. pneumophila, but not

by avirulent organisms (K. Matsunaga, T. W. Klein, H. Fried-

man, and Y. Yamamoto, unpublished data). Therefore, it can

be speculated that MCP induced by virulent bacteria plays an

immunoregulatory role in infection. Nevertheless, the results

obtained showed that alveolar macrophages respond to viru-

lent L. pneumophila infection differently than to infection with

avirulent bacteria. Particularly, the differential regulation of

chemokine MCP-3 induction by L. pneumophila was revealed

in this study. Thus, it is apparent that the cDNA expression

array technique is a powerful tool for analysis of host cell

responses to infection by L. pneumophila, and the results ob-

tained confirm that important modulations of gene expression

following exposure to infectious agents can be readily screened

by this technique.

This work was supported by grant AI45169 from the National Insti-

tute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.



REFERENCES

1. Baggiolini, M. 1998. Chemokine and leukocyte traffic. Nature 392:565–568.

2. Braun, M. C., E. Lahey, and B. L. Kelsall. 2000. Selective suppression of

IL-12 production by chemoattractants. J. Immunol. 164:3009–3017.

3. Friedman, H., R. Widen, T. Klein, L. Searls, and K. Cabrian. 1984. Legio-

nella pneumophila-induced blastogenesis of murine lymphoid cells in vitro.

Infect. Immun. 43:314–319.

4. Friedman, H., Y. Yamamoto, C. Newton, and T. W. Klein. 1998. Immuno-

logic response and pathophysiology of Legionella infection. Semin. Respir.

Infect. 13:100–108.

5. Kimura, H., N. Takizawa, N. Nozaki, and K. Sugimoto. 1995. Molecular

cloning of cDNA encoding mouse Cdc21 and CDC46 homologs and char-

acterization of the products: physical interaction between P1 (MCM3) and

CDC46 proteins. Nucleic Acids Res. 23:2097–2104.

6. Klein, T. W., C. Newton, Y. Yamamoto, and H. Friedman. 1999. Immune

responses to Legionella, p. 149–166. In L. J. Paradise, H. Friedman, and M.

Bendinelli (ed.), Opportunistic intracellular bacteria and immunity. Plenum

Press, New York, N.Y.

7. Mbawukie, I. N., and B. H. Herbert. 1989. MH-S, a murine alveolar macro-

phage cell line: morphological, cytochemical, and functional characteristics.

J. Leukoc. Biol. 46:119–127.

8. Radomski, N., and E. Jost. 1995. Molecular cloning of a murine cDNA

encoding a novel protein, p38-2G4, which varies with the cell cycle. Exp. Cell

Res. 220:434–445.

9. Sehgal, A., A. L. Boynton, R. F. Young, S. S. Vermeulen, K. S. Yonemura,



E. P. Kohler, H. C. Aldape, C. R. Simrell, and G. P. Murphy.

1998. Appli-

cation of the differential hybridization of Atlas human expression array

technique in the identification of differentially expressed genes in human

glioblastoma multiforme tumor tissue. J. Surg. Oncol. 67:234–241.

10. Standiford, T. J., S. L. Kunkel, M. J. Greenberger, L. L. Laichalk, and R. M.



Strieter.

1996. Expression and regulation of chemokines in bacterial pneu-

monia. J. Leukoc. Biol. 59:24–28.

11. Yamamoto, Y., T. W. Klein, and H. Friedman. 1993. Legionella pneumophila

virulence conserved after multiple single-colony passage on agar. Curr. Mi-

crobiol. 27:241–245.

12. Yamamoto, Y., T. W. Klein, and H. Friedman. 1996. Induction of cytokine

granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and chemokine macro-

phage inflammatory protein 2 mRNAs in macrophages by Legionella pneu-

mophila or Salmonella typhimurium attachment requires different ligand-

receptor systems. Infect. Immun. 64:3062–3068.

13. Yamamoto, Y., T. W. Klein, C. A. Newton, R. Widen, and H. Friedman. 1988.

Growth of Legionella pneumophila in thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal mac-

rophages from A/J mice. Infect. Immun. 56:370–375.

14. Yamamoto, Y., C. Retzlaff, P. He, T. W. Klein, and H. Friedman. 1995.

Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis of Legionella pneumophila-

induced cytokine mRNA in different macrophage populations by high-per-

formance liquid chromatography. Clin. Diagn. Lab. Immunol. 2:18–24.

Editor: J. D. Clements

FIG. 3. Levels of MIP-1

␤ (A) and MCP-3 (B) mRNA in MH-S cells infected

with virulent (strain M124) or avirulent (strain M124-Av) L. pneumophila. RNA

was extracted from the cells at 5 h (open column) or 24 h (closed column)

postinfection. The mRNA expression for chemokines was determined by RT-

PCR and normalized to

2



-microglobulin using densitometry readings. The data

are presented as the ratio (mean plus standard deviation) of chemokines to

2

-microglobulin densities from three independent experiments. —, noninfected



control;

ء, Ͻ 0.05 compared to noninfected control.

6072

NOTES


I

NFECT


. I

MMUN


.

 on May 3, 2017 by guest

http://iai.asm.org/

Downloaded from 




Yüklə 74,89 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə