O riginal a rticle colonic Volvulus in the United States Trends, Outcomes, and Predictors of Mortality



Yüklə 248,72 Kb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix01.05.2017
ölçüsü248,72 Kb.
  1   2   3

O

RIGINAL


A

RTICLE


Colonic Volvulus in the United States

Trends, Outcomes, and Predictors of Mortality

Wissam J. Halabi, MD,



Mehraneh D. Jafari, MD,



Celeste Y. Kang, MD,



Vinh Q. Nguyen, PhD,



Joseph C. Carmichael, MD,



Steven Mills, MD,



Alessio Pigazzi, MD, PhD,



and Michael J. Stamos, MD



Introduction: Colonic volvulus is a rare entity associated with high mortality

rates. Most studies come from areas of high endemicity and are limited by

small numbers. No studies have investigated trends, outcomes, and predictors

of mortality at the national level.



Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample 2002–2010 was retrospectively

reviewed for colonic volvulus cases admitted emergently. Patients’ demo-

graphics, hospital factors, and outcomes of the different procedures were

analyzed. The LASSO algorithm for logistic regression was used to build a

predictive model for mortality in cases of sigmoid (SV) and cecal volvulus

(CV) taking into account preoperative and operative variables.



Results: An estimated 3,351,152 cases of bowel obstruction were admitted

in the United States over the study period. Colonic volvulus was found to be

the cause in 63,749 cases (1.90%). The incidence of CV increased by 5.53%

per year whereas the incidence of SV remained stable. SV was more com-

mon in elderly males (aged 70 years), African Americans, and patients with

diabetes and neuropsychiatric disorders. In contrast, CV was more common

in younger females. Nonsurgical decompression alone was used in 17% of

cases. Among cases managed surgically, resective procedures were performed

in 89% of cases, whereas operative detorsion with or without fixation pro-

cedures remained uncommon. Mortality rates were 9.44% for SV, 6.64% for

CV, 17% for synchronous CV and SV, and 18% for transverse colon volvulus.

The LASSO algorithm identified bowel gangrene and peritonitis, coagulopa-

thy, age, the use of stoma, and chronic kidney disease as strong predictors of

mortality.



Conclusions: Colonic volvulus is a rare cause of bowel obstruction in the

United States and is associated with high mortality rates. CV and SV affect

different populations and the incidence of CV is on the rise. The presence of

bowel gangrene and coagulopathy strongly predicts mortality, suggesting that

prompt diagnosis and management are essential.

Keywords: sigmoid volvulus, cecal volvulus, transverse colon volvulus,

trends, mortality

(Ann Surg 2013;00: 1–9)

C

olonic volvulus refers to torsion of the bowel around its own



mesentery. This condition occurs in a long redundant colonic

segment that has an elongated mesentery with a narrow base.

1,2

It

is usually seen in the sigmoid colon, cecum, and less commonly, the



transverse colon and splenic flexure.

3–5


Colonic volvulus is thought

to account for 3.4% of all cases of bowel obstructions in the United

States

5

and 10% to 50% in areas of higher endemicity, such as Africa,



the Middle East, and South America

6,7


This geographic variation is

From the


Department of Surgery, University of California Irvine Medical Center,

Orange, CA; and

Department of Statistics, University of California Irvine,



Irvine, CA.

Disclosure: The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Reprints: Michael J. Stamos, MD, Department of Surgery, University of California

Irvine Medical Center 333 City Boulevard, West Suite 700, Orange, CA 92868.

E-mail: mstamos@uci.edu.

Copyright

C

2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins



ISSN: 0003-4932/13/00000-0001

DOI: 10.1097/SLA.0b013e31828c88ac

thought to be due to anatomical differences

8,9


; differences in diet,

altitude, cultural factors; and endemic infections.

10,11

If left unattended, colonic volvulus can compromise the blood



supply of the involved segment, leading to ischemia, gangrene, perfo-

ration, and death.

1,12

The mainstay of sigmoid volvulus management



has been through proctoscopic or colonoscopic decompression when

feasible, followed by surgery either during the same admission or

electively. Cecal volvulus is mostly managed surgically as the vast ma-

jority of these cases are not amenable to endoscopic decompression.

13

Most published literature on colonic volvulus is limited by



small numbers accumulated over decades, with significant disparities

in management techniques and outcomes. Moreover, these studies

mainly come from areas of high endemicity where volvulus usually

presents in a younger population and is thus associated with lower

mortality rates

11

compared with countries of low endemicity such as



the United States.

In the United States, the few available reports that investigated

the incidence of colonic volvulus relative to other causes of bowel

obstruction are either outdated or limited to large centers in specific

regions. National-level data investigating incidences, practices trends,

and outcomes in different hospital settings are thus lacking. Moreover,

because prior data were limited by small sample sizes, a meaningful

analysis of the predictors of mortality in sigmoid and cecal volvulus

was never undertaken. This is a large retrospective analysis of colonic

volvulus in the United States over a 9-year period, investigating trends,

outcomes, and predictors of mortality of the different procedures

performed for this disease entity.



METHODS

Patient Population and Data Source

Data were extracted from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization

Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from January 1,

2002 to December 31, 2010. We performed a retrospective analysis

of colonic volvulus cases that underwent operative and nonoperative

management. The NIS is the largest all-payer inpatient care database

in the United States and contains information from nearly 8 million

hospital stays each year across the country. The data set approxi-

mates a 20% stratified sample of American community, nonmilitary,

nonfederal hospitals, resulting in a sampling frame that comprises ap-

proximately 95% of all hospital discharges in the United States. Data

elements within the NIS are drawn from hospital discharge abstracts

that allow determination of all procedures performed during a given

hospitalization.

14

Approval for the use of this database was obtained



from the institutional review board of the University of California-

Irvine Medical Center and the NIS.



Study Aims

The aim of our analysis was to investigate the management

trends of colonic volvulus in the United States over a 9-year period.

Mean patient age, comorbidity scores based on the Elixhauser-Van

Walraven model,

15

and mortality rates for the different procedures



were listed. The yearly number of admissions for all causes of bowel

obstruction in the US was provided as a reference. These include

Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.

Annals of Surgery

r

Volume 00, Number 00, 2013



www.annalsofsurgery.com

1



Halabi et al

Annals of Surgery

r

Volume 00, Number 00, 2013



small and large bowel obstruction due to adhesions, strictures, tu-

mors, impaction, and hernia with obstruction. In the remainder of the

analysis, we selected what we expected to be the largest groups of

cases, namely, cecal volvulus and sigmoid volvulus that underwent

resection. Patient characteristics, surgical management in different

hospital settings, and the associated mortality rates were examined.

Surgical management includes the use of laparoscopy and the as-

sociated conversion rates and the use of an ostomy. The outcomes

of surgical resection were listed for the 2 groups. Finally, we built

predictive models for in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing re-

section for cecal volvulus and sigmoid volvulus. The model takes into

account comorbidities present on admission, hospital and operative

factors, excluding postoperative complications.

Inclusion Criteria

All patients with an International Classification of Diseases,



Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9 CM) diagnosis code

for colonic volvulus (560.2) admitted urgently or emergently who

underwent any of the procedures identified by the associated ICD-9

CM procedure codes were included in our analysis: enema decom-

pression, endoscopic decompression, operative reduction, operative

reduction and fixation, cecostomy or sigmoidostomy, resection with

primary anastomosis, resection with the use of an ostomy, and total or

subtotal colectomy. Laparoscopic modifier codes (54.21, 54.51) were

used to identify laparoscopic cases for the years before 2009.

Because colonic volvulus has 1 single ICD-9 diagnosis code,

we used the associated ICD-9 procedure codes to differentiate among

cecal, sigmoid, and transverse colon volvulus that underwent resec-

tion. A binary model was used to ensure that no overlap occurred

among identified cases and that each case is counted once.

Exclusion Criteria

Patients with a diagnosis of colonic volvulus who did not un-

dergo any of the aforementioned procedures or who died before

surgery were excluded from our analysis to minimize the risk of

coding errors. Elective cases were excluded as our aim was to inves-

tigate management trends and outcomes in the acute setting. Missing

variables listed in Tables 2 to 4 were also excluded from our analysis.

These include data on ethnicity, hospital factors, and mortality.



Study Variables

Patient factors, such as age, sex, ethnicity, primary payer type,

and comorbidities, provided by NIS were considered in our predic-

tive models for mortality. The list of comorbidities is based on the

Elixhauser model for comorbidity measures.

16

Presence of peritonitis



or bowel gangrene identified by their respective ICD-9 codes were

also used in our predictive model. Hospital factors, such as teaching

status, location, and size, were considered in our model, as previ-

ous reports have underlined differences in mortality rates in sigmoid

volvulus cases managed in different hospital settings.

17

Operative



factors, such as the use of stoma, laparoscopic versus open surgery,

and emergent versus semielective surgery, were considered in our

model-building routine as well. Cases that underwent endoscopic de-

compression on admission followed by surgery during the same hos-

pitalization were considered in the semielective surgery group. Those

who underwent surgery on admission without prior endoscopic de-

compression were considered in the emergent surgery group. In the

cecal volvulus model, we excluded the semielective versus emergent

surgery variable, as these cases are usually not amenable to endo-

scopic decompression. This list of variables we hypothesized would

predict that mortality was chosen a priori.

Statistical Analysis

All statistical analyses were conducted using SAS, version 9.3,

and the R Statistical Environment. The LASSO algorithm for logistic

regression

18

was used to identify variables predictive of mortality in



patients who underwent resection for sigmoid or cecal volvulus in a

complete case analysis. Ten-fold cross-validation together with the

1-SE rule was used to determine the model size (number of variables)

to control for overfitting.

19

In contrast to the classic multivariate



logistic regression in which odds ratios are independent of each other

and cannot be added together to predict mortality, LASSO assigns a

coefficient to each predictor. These coefficients can be added together

to calculate the predicted inhospital mortality risk for each individual.

For a coefficient total of x, the inhospital mortality risk is e

x

/(1


+

e

x

). Separate models for sigmoid and cecal volvulus were built. The

receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) and C-statistic were

used to describe how well our model predicts mortality.

RESULTS

From 2002 to 2010, an estimated 3,351,152 patients were ad-

mitted with a bowel obstruction in the United States. Colonic volvulus

accounted for 63,749 cases (1.90%). Admissions for bowel obstruc-

tion increased steadily from 2002, reaching a peak in 2008 and then

decreasing over the last 2 years of the study period, whereas the num-

ber of admissions for colonic volvulus increased over the last 3 years

of the study period. This increase was mainly driven by admissions

for cecal volvulus that showed an upward trend, increasing by an

average of 5.53% per year over the study period. Sigmoid volvulus

cases remained relatively stable over the study period (Table 1).

Nonsurgical methods, such as enema or endoscopic decom-

pression for sigmoid volvulus, not followed by surgery during the

same admission were used in 16.6% of cases. Enema was used in-

frequently, primarily in relatively elderly patients with high comor-

bidity scores. The use of endoscopic decompression alone showed a

relatively stable incidence and had an associated mortality of 6.4%

(Table 1).

Surgical methods not involving resection remained relatively

infrequent in the acute setting. Surgical detorsion without fixation

(4.2% of surgical cases) was associated with a relatively high mortal-

ity of 7.8%, considering the younger age of this population. Surgical

fixation such as cecopexy or sigmoidopexy (3.3% of surgical cases)

was performed in patients with relatively low comorbidity scores and

was associated with low mortality rates. Enterostomy procedures such

as cecostomy or sigmoidostomy (3.3%) were used in relatively sick

patients and had a 13.0% mortality rate (Table 1).

Among cases managed surgically, resection was the most com-

monly performed procedure in 89.3% of cases. Resective procedures

were performed for cecal, sigmoid, synchronous cecal and sigmoid,

and transverse colon volvulus. A subtotal or total colectomy was re-

quired in 16.0% of sigmoid volvulus cases. In these cases, patients

had relatively high associated comorbidity scores and mortality rates

(14.6%). It is interesting to note that we identified 576 cases of syn-

chronous cecal volvulus and sigmoid volvulus. Patients in this group

had the highest comorbidity scores and a mortality rate of almost

18%. The other interesting finding is the 597 identified cases of trans-

verse colon volvulus: these had high comorbidity scores and mortal-

ity rates considering again the younger age group of this population

(Table 1).

Laparoscopic techniques were rarely applied in the manage-

ment of colonic volvulus, accounting for 3.7% of surgical cases.

However, the use of laparoscopy has increased over the study period,

especially in the last 3 years. Laparoscopy was used in relatively

younger patients with lower comorbidity scores and the associated

mortality rates were lower than their corresponding open counterpart.

Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.

2

| www.annalsofsurgery.com

C

2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins


Annals of Surgery

r

Volume 00, Number 00, 2013



Colonic Volvulus in the United States

TABLE

1

.

National


E

stimates


of

Cases



P

erformed


Per

Y

ear



for

C

olonic



Volvulus.

Mean


Age,

Comorbidity

S

core,


and


M

ortality


R

ates


Per

P

rocedure



Type

Are


Presented

Pr

ocedur

e

Y

ear

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

T

o

tal

Mean

Ag

e

Comorbidity

Scor

e

M

or

tality

,

%

Barium


enema

decompression

10

0

0



5

1

5



5

14

0



4

53

76



7.09

0

Endoscopic



decompression

1,284


1,198

1,222


1,182

1,296


950

1,140


1,144

1,129


10,545

72

5.92



6.41

Operati


v

e

detorsion



onl

y

(cecal



or

sigmoid)


Open

220


285

241


207

244


184

242


232

207


2,062

53

4.67



7.76

Laparoscopic

1

8

1



0

9

11



23

9

2



6

2

9



1

0

145



51

3.83


0

Detorsion

and

fixation


onl

y

(cecope



xy

,

sigmoidope



xy

,

o



r

fixation


o

f

the



transv

erse


colon)

Open


226

206


221

205


99

165


225

119


133

1,599


60

3.35


3.43

Laparoscopic

1

4

2



6

1

8



6

20

18



23

16

26



167

58

2.66



3.01

Enterostom

y

(cecostom



y

o

r



sigmoidostom

y

)



Open

188


177

161


202

166


236

140


233

162


1,665

68

7.57



13.09

Laparoscopic

5

5

0



5

1

9



9

10

10



5

6

8



7

2

3



.21

7

.02



Resection

for


cecal

v

o



lvulus

Open


2,141

1,902


2,187

2,313


2,572

2,456


3,166

3,007


2,974

22,718


63

4.79


6.65

Laparoscopic

1

5

3



0

4

5



6

4

8



2

7

7



7

7

9



9

185


674

58

2.60



4.90

Resection

for

sigmoid


v

o

lvulus



Open

2,136


2,070

1,923


2,053

2,086


2,039

1,973


2,037

2,070


18,387

71

7.49



9.73

Laparoscopic

3

0

5



6

2

5



5

8

4



7

7

2



8

6

238



221

833


67

5.85


1.80

Resection

for

metachronous



cecal

v

o



lvulus

and


sigmoid

v

olvulus



Open

46

71



60

70

60



86

68

62



43

566


67

8.94


17.84

L

ap



ar

o

sc



o

p

ic



000500005

1

0



6

2

3



.0

0

0



Resection

for


transv

erse


colon

v

o



lvulus

Open


33

56

58



88

40

44



135

66

67



587

59

6.10



16.70

L

ap



ar

o

sc



o

p

ic



000000550

1

0



5

4

4



.0

0

0



Subtotal

or

total



colectom

y

Open



383

362


459

370


455

433


397

295


428

3582


65

7.63


14.63

Laparoscopic

1

4

9



0

1

5



1

5

9



11

0

5



78

59

6.33



11.54

T

o



tal

cases


of

colonic


v

o

lvulus



6,763

6,463


6,629

6,859


7,239

6,792


7,738

7,592


7,674

63,749


T

o

tal



cases

of

bo



w

el

obstr



uction

(all


causes)

345,567


344,250

359,243


370,420

373,616


377,206

403,039


398,525

379,286


3,351,152

These



numbers

based


o

n

N



IS

ag

ree



with

the


National

Hospital


Dischar

g

e



S

ur

v



ey

.

A



binar

y

decision



model

w

as



used

to

ensure



that

n

o



o

v

erlap



of

cases


occurs

during


data

anal


ysis.

Each


case

represents

a

single


occur

rence.


Comorbidity

scores

are


based

o

n



the

NIS


comorbidity

v

ariab



les

and


are

calculated

using

the


V

an

W



alra

v

en



m

odel.


NIS

indicates

Nationwide

Inpatient

Sample.

Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article is prohibited.



C

2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

www.annalsofsurgery.com

3


Halabi et al

Annals of Surgery

r

Volume 00, Number 00, 2013




Yüklə 248,72 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə