Practical No (1) The Microscope



Yüklə 0,55 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
səhifə1/3
tarix03.03.2020
ölçüsü0,55 Mb.
  1   2   3

Practical No (1) 

The Microscope 

 

A microscope is an instrument that magnifies objects otherwise too small to 

be  seen,  producing  an  image  in  which  the  object  appears  larger.  Most 

photographs of cells are taken using a microscope, and these pictures can also 

be called micrographs. 

There are many types of microscope (simple microscope, compound or light 

microscope, and electron microscope). 

In this lab we use only compound microscope also called student microscope. 

These microscope consist of multiple lenses. Because of the way these lenses 

are arranged, they can bend light to produce a much more magnified image 

than that of a magnifying glass. 

Parts of a microscope:- 

1-  The  OCULAR  (eyepiece)  contains  the  upper  most  lenses  of  the 

microscope. If your microscope has one ocular it is a monocular microscope, 

if it has two, it is binocular. 

2-  The  BODY  TUBE  connects  the  ocular  to  the  nosepiece.  This  is  a  tube 

through which light rays pass between the upper and lower lenses. 

3- The NOSEPIECE is a rotating disc on which the objectives are mounted. 

4-  There  may  be  three  or  four  OBJECTIVES  of  different  lengths  and 

magnifying powers attached to the nosepiece of your microscope. 

Scanning lens 4X magnification 

Low power lens 10X magnification 

High power lens 40-45X magnification 

Oil immersion lens 100X magnification 

5- The ARM supports the above parts. This is one of two structures that should 

be held when carrying the microscope. 

6- The STAGE is the platform with a mechanical stage for holding the slides 

in place. 

Note the circular opening in the center of the stage, which allows light to pass 

through.  The  object,  which  is  to  be  viewed,  should  be  centered  over  this 

opening. 

7- The DIAPHRAGM may be an iris or rotating disc, depending on the kind 

of microscope. It is located below the stage. 

8-  Condenser  lens  system,  located  immediately  under  the  stage,  contains  a 

system of lenses that focuses light on your specimen. The condenser may be 

raised or lowered using the condenser knob. An older microscope may have a 

concave mirror instead. 



9- The BASE is the heavy, also called the supporting stand, rests on the bench. 

10-  The  COARSE  ADJUSTMENT  is  the  large  milled  wheel  on  the 

microscope, which 

is used in focusing the lenses. 

11- The FINE ADJUSTMENT is the smaller milled wheel on the microscope. 

The  wheel  may  be  separate  from  the  coarse  adjustment  wheel  on  some 

microscopes. 

12-  The  LIGHT  SOURCE  has  an  (ON/Off)  switch  &  may  have  adjustable 

lamp intensities & color filters. 

 

During this lab exercise, you will:- 

Prepare a temporary wet mount of sections of onion membrane and wet mount 

cell  of  buccal  cavity,  view  the  specimen  through  a  microscope,  identify 

common structures, and make a three-dimensional drawing of a typical onion 

cell. 


Procedures 

How to prepare an Onion slide? 

1- Obtain a clean slide and cover slip. 

2- Place  a  single layer  of  onionskin (skin  between  the onion  layers)  on  the 

center of the slide, and then add 1 or 2 drops of iodine stain. Be sure to spread 

it out evenly so there is no overlap or double layering. 

3- Touch the cover slip to one edge of the drop, and gently lower it. (If you 

drop the cover slip too quickly, air bubbles will be trapped. You cannot see 

through an air bubble). 

4- Observe these cells first at 4X, then 10X, 40X and make a sketch of a few 

cells in the space provided on the data sheet. Be careful when working with 

the stain You should be able to see the following structures that are typical of 

plant cells: (1) cell wall, (2) nucleus, (3) one or more nucleoli in the nucleus, 

and (4) cytoplasm. 

How to prepare the buccal sample? 

Prepare a wet-mount slide of buccal cells (lining the inner surface of the cheek 

of man) 

1- Obtain a clean slide and cover slip. 

2- 

Collect the cells of the inner lining of the cheek gently by a tooth stick. 



3- 

Put the sample which contains cells on a slide. 

4- 

Add one drop of methylene blue stain and a cover slip. 



5- 

Examine it under the microscope,  

record your observations in a fully labeled drawing.

 on your science book

 

 

 



Note:-

 

Turn  off  the  power,  rotate  the  4X  objective  into  position,  remove  the  slide 

from the stage 

and clean the stage and wash wet mount slides and throw away cover slips. 



Exercise NO (1):- 

- Draw an onion cells from your specimen (4X, 10X and 40X). 

- Draw buccal cells from your specimen (by 40X). 

 

 



 

Practical No (2) 

The Cell 

 

The cell concept is basic for understanding the activities and characteristics of 



organisms. Cells are  the smallest  units of  living things  and are  the units  of 

structure and function of an organism. As functional units, they reflect the 

abilities of the organism as a whole. Some simple kinds of organisms consist 

of individual cells, but many of the organisms with which we are most familiar 

are multicellular. Multicellular organisms usually are composed of several 

different kinds of cells, each having specific characteristics that relate to its 

function. The various kinds of living things have been subdivided into three 

domains: Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukaryote. The cells of the Bacteria and 

Archaea are small and simple, and they lack a nucleus. These cells are called 

prokaryotic  cells. The cells of the Eukaryote all have a nucleus and other 

kinds of structures called organelles within the cell. This type of cell is called 

eukaryotic  cell. 

 

The complexity in the cell: 

•  The Eukaryote cell are more complex than Prokaryote. 

•  Eukaryote have nuclei and compartments organelles 

•  Prokaryotic  cells  lack  nuclei  and  other  organelles  ,  and  tend  to  be  less 

complex. 

Organelles of the cell: 



Cell wall: 

•  Commonly found in plant & bacteria. 

 Bacterial  cell  walls  are  composed  of  peptidoglycan,  but  in  plant  made  of 

cellulose 


Plasma membrane: 

•  The Plasma membrane also called cell membrane  is the outer lining of the 

cell.  

•  They made of a double layer of phospholipid molecules. 



•   It separates the cell from its environment and allows materials to enter and 

leave the cell 

 

 

Cytoplasm

•  Within  cells,  the    Cytoplasm    is  made  up  of  a  jelly-like  fluid  (called  the 

cytosol) and other structures that surround the nucleus. 

•  The cytoplasm  contains  the  chemical  wealth  of  the  cell:  the  sugars,  amino 

acids, and proteins the cell uses to carry out its everyday activities. 

Cytoskeleton

•  The cytoskeleton is an intricate network of proteins filaments  that crisscross 

the cytoplasm of cells 

•  Structural support and cell movement. 

•  It include: 

1.  Microtubules (tubulin). 

2.  Microfilaments (Actin). 

3.  Intermediate filaments (Keratin). 



Nucleus (the brains of a cell): 

•  The  nucleus  (plural-nuclei)  is  roughly  spherical  and  is  surrounded 

by two membranes.  

•  In animal cells, they are typically located in the central region of the cell. 

•  Our genetic material (DNA), in the form of chromosomes, is stored in this 

organelle. 



•  The nucleolus found inside nucleus contain RNA to build protein. 

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER): 

•  The ER is composed of a lipid bilayer embedded with proteins (the source of 

name). 

•  It weaves in sheets through the interior of the cell, creating a series of channels 



between its folds. 

•  This organelle helps process molecules created by the cell. 

•  consists of two types: 

1.  Rough ER synthesizes  proteins,  

2.  while smooth ER organizes the synthesis of lipids and other biosynthetic 

activities. 

Golgi apparatus (Delivery System of the Cell): 

•  Golgi  bodies:  Flattened  stacks  of  membranes,  often  occur  interconnected 

with one another 

•  Collectively the Golgi bodies are referred to as the Golgi apparatus 

•  The Golgi apparatus functions in the collection, packaging, and distribution 

of  molecules  synthesized  at  one  place  in  the  cell  and  utilized  at  another 

location in the cell. 

Lysosomes  and Micro-bodies

•  Lysosomes  membrane-bounded digestive vesicles. 

•  Throughout the lives of eukaryotic cells, lysosomal enzymes break down old 

organelles, recycling their component molecules and making room for newly 

formed organelles. 

•  Microbodies are found in the cells of plants, animals, fungi, and protists. Plant 

cells  have  a  special  type  of  microbody  called  a  glyoxysome  that  contains 

enzymes that convert fats into carbohydrates  

•  peroxisome, contains enzymes that catalyze the removal of electrons and as 

associated hydrogen atoms 



Ribosomes: 

•  Ribosomes are made up of several molecules of a special form of RNA called 

ribosomal RNA, or rRNA, bound within a complex of several dozen different 

proteins. 

•  Each ribosome is composed of two subunits. 

•  Bacterial ribosomes are smaller than eukaryotic ribosomes. 

•  Can  float  freely  in  the  cytoplasm  or  be  connected  to  the  endoplasmic 

reticulum. 



Mitochondria: 

•  Mitochondria  (singular,  mitochondrion)  are  typically  tubular  or  sausage-

shaped  organelles  about  the  size  of  bacteria  and  found  in  all  types  of 

eukaryotic cells 



•  They have a smooth outer membrane and an inner on folded into numerous 

contiguous layers called cristae. 

•  Contain enzymes that carry out cellular respiration and generate ATP  using 

O

2

 

•  Mitochondria have their own DNA 



Chloroplasts

•  Plants and other eukaryotic organisms that carry out photosynthesis typically 

contain from one to several hundred chloroplasts. Chloroplasts contain the 

•  Photosynthetic pigment chlorophyll that gives most plants their green color. 

•  In addition to the outer and inner membranes, have a closed compartment of 

stacked membranes called grana (singular, granum), which lie internal to the 

inner membrane 

•  Each  granum may contain from a few to several dozen disk-shaped structures 

called thylakoids. 

•  Surrounding the thylakoid is a fluid matrix called the stroma. 

•  Chloroplasts have their own DNA 

•  The  main  role  of  chloroplasts  is  to  conduct  photosynthesis,  where  the 

photosynthetic  pigment  chlorophyll  captures  the  energy  from  sunlight  and 

converts  it  and  stores  it  in  the  energy-storage  molecules  ATP  and  NADPH 

while freeing oxygen from water. 

Vacuole: 

•  It’s a membrane bound organelle which is present in all plant and fungal cells 

and some protist, animal and bacterial cells.  

•  The organelle has no basic shape or size; its structure varies according to the 

needs of the cell 

•  Plant  cells  often  have  a  large  membrane-bounded  sac  called  a  central 



vacuole, which stores proteins, pigments and waste materials. 

Centrosomes

•  Centrosomes are key to the division of cells and produce the spindle fibers 

that are required during metaphase of mitosis.  

•  They are found in the cells of animals and most protists. 

•  Each centrosome consists of two centrioles that are orientated at right-angles 

to each other. 

•  Each centriole is a cylindrical array of 9 microtubules 

 

Transportation of materials through Cell Membrane 

All  molecules  and  ions  in  the  body  fluids  including  water  molecules  and 

dissolved substances are in constant motion. 

Transport through the cell membrane either directly through the lipid bilayer 

or through proteins (integral or intrinsic proteins). 



Transport through the cell membrane occurs by the one of two basic process: 

1. Active transport requiring cellular energy. 

2. Passive transport requiring no energy (Diffusion, Osmosis). 

Diffusion could be simple or facilitated. 

 

Exercise No (2) part (1):- 

1-  You  will  draw  the  different  organelles  from  the  animal  and  plant  cell 

models. 

2- Write the different between animal and plant cell. 



Exercise No (2) part (2) 

Experiment No (1): Diffusion 

Objectives: 

To demonstrate the movement of solutes (particles) from high concentration 

to low concentration. 

Materials: 

Test tube, Ink, dropper and water. 



Procedure: 

Add a drop of ink to the water in the test tube. 

 Record your observation. 

Experiment No (2): Osmosis 

Objective: 

To  demonstrate  the  movement  of  water  across  a  differentially  permeable 

membrane. 

Materials: 

NaCl crystal, potato, razor blade and a Petri dish. 



Procedure 1: 

Cut  the  anterior  and  the  posterior  ends  of  the  potato  tuber.  Make  a  small 

groove on one end 

and fill it with NaCl crystals. Put the potato in a Petri dish. Leave it for one 

hour.  

Record your observations. 

Experiment No (3): Plasmolysis 

Refers to the shrinking of the cytoplasm of a cell in response to diffusion water 

out of the cell. This may occur when cells are placed in a solution containing 

a high concentration of solutes. 



Materials: 

Slides,  coverslip,  hypertonic,  isotonic  and  hypotonic  solutions,  onion  and 

microscope. 

(Isotonic: the solutions being compared have equal concentration of solutes (" 

ISO"  means  the  same).  Hypertonic:  The  solution  with  the  higher 


concentration  of  solutes  ("HYPER"  means  more).  Hypotonic:  The  solution 

with the lower concentration of solutes ("HYPO" means less). 



Procedure: 

Remove the thin onion layer from the onion slice then transfer it to a Petri dish 

containing 

either hypertonic, isotonic or hypotonic solution and leave it for 2- 3 minutes. 

Put it on slide 

and put the cover slip. Examine under the microscope.  



Record and draw your observations. 

Experiment No (4): Permeability 

Objective: 

To demonstrate the permeability of the cell membrane. 



1. PH Effect: 

Materials

Beetroot dilute, NaOH, dilute HCl and test tubes. 



Procedure: 

Cut a fresh beetroot to small cubes and wash under running water to remove 

the red color 

of the anthocyanin pigments. Transfer 3-4 cubes to three test tubes containing 

a dilute NaOH and dilute HCl and distilled water solutions and leave it for 5 

minutes. Observe the changed in color. 

 Record your observations. 

2. Effect of Heat and Alcohol: 

Materials: 

Beetroot, distilled water, alcohol, test tube and water bath. 



Procedure: 

Cut a fresh beetroot to small slices and wash under the running  water. Then 

transfer the beet 

cubes into tubes containing the flowing: 

3-4 cubes =5 ml distilled water, leave for 5 minutes. 

3-4 cubes=5ml distilled water, heat for 5 minutes. 

3-4 cubes =5 ml of alcohol, leave for 5 minutes 

Shake the tubes well after 2 minute and record you observations in a table.

 

 

 



Practical No (3)

 

Unicellular Organisms 

 

Protozoa:- 

The protozoa are the simplest and most primitive animals, usually defined as 

"unicellular" animals,  the  protozoa  are  classified into  four  classes  based  on 

the structures them possess for locomotion: 

1- Class: Sarcodina: 



Protozoa with locomotion by means of pseudopodia (Rhizopoda). 





Mostly free living, some are parasitic. 



Reproduction: asexually by binary fission and sexually by syngamy. 





Examples: Amoeba, Entamoeba



2- Class: Mastigophora: 



Protozoa with locomotion by means of flagella. 





Free living or parasite. 



Reproduction: A sexual reproduction by longitudinal fission. 





this class divided into two types depending on method of feeding: 



A: Phytomastigophora like Euglena 

B: Zoomastigophora  like Trypanosoma 

3- Class: Sporozoa: 



Parasitic protozoa without locomotion structure but move by gliding. 





Contractile vacuoles is absent. 



Body covered with pellicle. 





Reproduction: Asexual reproduction by fission and Sexual reproduction by 

spores. 



Example: Plasmodium



4- Class: Ciliate: 



Protozoa with locomotion by means of cilia. 





Body covered by pellicle. 



Reproduction: Asexual reproduction by binary fission. Sexual reproduction 



by conjugation. 



Nuclei 2 types i.e. macronucleus and micronucleus. 





Free living or parasite. 



Examples: Paramecium, Balantidium 



Bacteria:- 

Bacteria are the sole members of the Kingdom Monera. They are the most 

abundant  microorganisms.  Bacteria  occur  almost  everywhere.  Hundreds  of 

bacteria  are  present  in  a  handful  of  soil.  They  also  live  in  extreme  habitats 



such as hot springs, deserts, snow and deep oceans where very few other life 

forms can survive. Many of them live in or on other organisms as parasites. 

Bacteria are grouped under four categories based on their shape: the spherical 

Coccus (pl.: cocci), the rod-shaped Bacillus (pl.: bacilli), the comma-shaped 

Vibrium (pl.: vibrio) and the spiral Spirillum (pl.: spirilla). 

Though the bacterial structure is very simple, they are very complex in 

behavior. Compared to many other organisms, bacteria as a group show the 

most extensive metabolic diversity. Some of the bacteria are autotrophic 

they  synthesis  their  own  food  from  inorganic  substrates.  They  may  b 

photosynthetic autotrophic or chemosynthetic autotrophic. The vast majority 

of  bacteria  are  heterotrophs,  i.e.,  they  do  not  synthesis  their  own  food  but 

depend on other organisms or on dead organic matter for food. 



Exercise No (5) 

Draw all the organisms and label any organelles you were able to see on 

your science book.

 

 

 



 

 

Practical No (4) 

Multicellular Organisms 

 

Fungi:- 

The fungi constitute a unique kingdom of heterotrophic organisms. They show 

a great diversity in morphology and habitat. When your bread develops a 

mould or your orange rots it is because of fungi. The common mushroom you 

eat and toadstools are fungi. White spots seen on mustard leaves are due to a 

parasitic fungus. Some unicellular fungi, e.g.,  yeast are used to make  bread 

and beer. Other fungi cause diseases in plants and animals; wheat rust-causing 

Puccinia is an important example. Some are the source of antibiotics, e.g., 

Penicillium. Fungi are cosmopolitan and occur in air, water, soil and on 

animals and plants. They prefer to grow in warm and humid places. With the 

exception of yeasts, which are unicellular, fungi, are filamentous. Their bodies 

consist of long, slender thread-like structures called hyphae. 



Animalia:- 

Animals are Eukaryotic, multicellular organisms that form the biological 

kingdom Animalia. Animals are motile (able to move), heterotrophic 

(consume organic material), reproduce sexually, and their embryonic 

development includes a blastula stage. The body plan of the animal derives 

from this blastula, differentiating specialized tissues and organs as it develops; 

this plan eventually becomes fixed, although some undergo metamorphosis at 

some stage in their lives. Animals are divided by body plan into vertebrates 

and invertebrates. Vertebrates—fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and 

mammals—have  a vertebral column (spine); invertebrates do not. All 

vertebrates and most invertebrates are bilaterally symmetrical (Bilateria). 

These  invertebrates  include  arthropods,  molluscs,  roundworms,  ringed 

worms, flatworms, and other phyla in Ecdysozoa and Spiralia. 

Subkingdom  Metazoans:- 

Is categorized into three phylum's: 



1) Nematodes 

Round  worms,  Round  in  cross  section;  Separate  sexes;  Complete  digestive 

tract;  500,000  species  only  a  few  parasitic  to  man  e.g.-  Ancylostoma 

(hookworm). 



Yüklə 0,55 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:
  1   2   3




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə